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Comparison of once daily radiotherapy to 60 Gy and twice daily radiotherapy to 45 Gy for limited stage small-cell lung cancer.

Han D, Hao S, Tao C, Zhao Q, Wei Y, Song Z, Li B - Thorac Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Statistically significant differences were found in the rates of both grade 2 or higher esophagitis (P = 0.036) and pneumonitis (P = 0.043) between QD and BID groups, respectively.Pneumonitis was more common in the QD group, and esophagitis was more common in the BID group.Although there were no significant differences in OS and LRFS between the QD and BID groups, there was a trend toward improved local control in the BID group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital & Institute, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences Jinan, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was designed to compare toxicities, disease control, and survival outcomes for limited disease small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) treated with once daily (QD) versus twice daily (BID) radiotherapy.

Methods: All of the patients received four to six cycles of platinum plus etoposide. In the QD group, irradiation was given via conventional radiotherapy with a dose of 60 Gy at 2 Gy per once-daily fraction. In the BID group, the dose was 45 Gy at 1.5 Gy per twice-daily fraction.

Results: Data from a total of 143 LD-SCLC patients treated at the Shandong Cancer Hospital & Institute were retrospectively analyzed. Statistically significant differences were found in the rates of both grade 2 or higher esophagitis (P = 0.036) and pneumonitis (P = 0.043) between QD and BID groups, respectively. Grade 3 esophagitis occurred in 6% of patients receiving QD and 19% of those receiving BID therapy. The median overall survival (OS) of all patients was 30.4 months: 29.5 months for QD therapy, and 31.4 months for BID therapy. The two-year OS rate was 43.3% for QD therapy, and 48.8% for BID therapy. The two-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate was 45% versus 63.4% for the QD group versus the BID group, respectively.

Conclusions: Pneumonitis was more common in the QD group, and esophagitis was more common in the BID group. Although there were no significant differences in OS and LRFS between the QD and BID groups, there was a trend toward improved local control in the BID group.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Incidence of progression-free survival by radiotherapy fractionation pattern. , once daily (QD); , twice daily (BID).
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fig02: Incidence of progression-free survival by radiotherapy fractionation pattern. , once daily (QD); , twice daily (BID).

Mentions: The median follow-up was 27.14 months, with a range of six–62 months until the last follow-up date (30 August 2014). Of the 143 patients, 107 had died: 62 (77%) patients who had received QD therapy and 45 (71%) who had received BID therapy. The median OS of all patients was 30.4 months: 29.5 months for QD, and 31.4 months for BID therapy ( Figure 1). The two-year OS rate was 43.3% and 48.8% for QD and BID therapy, respectively. The five-year OS rate was 13.3% for QD, and 19.6% for BID therapy. The difference in OS between the two groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.558 by the log-rank test). The rate of two-year PFS was 33.2% for patients who had received QD therapy and 33.5% for those who had received BID therapy (P = 0.515 by the log-rank test; Figure 2). Although there was no statistically significant difference (P = 0.068 by the log-rank test) in LRFS between the QD and BID groups, there was a trend toward improved local control for the BID group, with an estimated two-year LRFS at 45% versus 63.4% for the QD group.


Comparison of once daily radiotherapy to 60 Gy and twice daily radiotherapy to 45 Gy for limited stage small-cell lung cancer.

Han D, Hao S, Tao C, Zhao Q, Wei Y, Song Z, Li B - Thorac Cancer (2015)

Incidence of progression-free survival by radiotherapy fractionation pattern. , once daily (QD); , twice daily (BID).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4567011&req=5

fig02: Incidence of progression-free survival by radiotherapy fractionation pattern. , once daily (QD); , twice daily (BID).
Mentions: The median follow-up was 27.14 months, with a range of six–62 months until the last follow-up date (30 August 2014). Of the 143 patients, 107 had died: 62 (77%) patients who had received QD therapy and 45 (71%) who had received BID therapy. The median OS of all patients was 30.4 months: 29.5 months for QD, and 31.4 months for BID therapy ( Figure 1). The two-year OS rate was 43.3% and 48.8% for QD and BID therapy, respectively. The five-year OS rate was 13.3% for QD, and 19.6% for BID therapy. The difference in OS between the two groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.558 by the log-rank test). The rate of two-year PFS was 33.2% for patients who had received QD therapy and 33.5% for those who had received BID therapy (P = 0.515 by the log-rank test; Figure 2). Although there was no statistically significant difference (P = 0.068 by the log-rank test) in LRFS between the QD and BID groups, there was a trend toward improved local control for the BID group, with an estimated two-year LRFS at 45% versus 63.4% for the QD group.

Bottom Line: Statistically significant differences were found in the rates of both grade 2 or higher esophagitis (P = 0.036) and pneumonitis (P = 0.043) between QD and BID groups, respectively.Pneumonitis was more common in the QD group, and esophagitis was more common in the BID group.Although there were no significant differences in OS and LRFS between the QD and BID groups, there was a trend toward improved local control in the BID group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital & Institute, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences Jinan, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was designed to compare toxicities, disease control, and survival outcomes for limited disease small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) treated with once daily (QD) versus twice daily (BID) radiotherapy.

Methods: All of the patients received four to six cycles of platinum plus etoposide. In the QD group, irradiation was given via conventional radiotherapy with a dose of 60 Gy at 2 Gy per once-daily fraction. In the BID group, the dose was 45 Gy at 1.5 Gy per twice-daily fraction.

Results: Data from a total of 143 LD-SCLC patients treated at the Shandong Cancer Hospital & Institute were retrospectively analyzed. Statistically significant differences were found in the rates of both grade 2 or higher esophagitis (P = 0.036) and pneumonitis (P = 0.043) between QD and BID groups, respectively. Grade 3 esophagitis occurred in 6% of patients receiving QD and 19% of those receiving BID therapy. The median overall survival (OS) of all patients was 30.4 months: 29.5 months for QD therapy, and 31.4 months for BID therapy. The two-year OS rate was 43.3% for QD therapy, and 48.8% for BID therapy. The two-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate was 45% versus 63.4% for the QD group versus the BID group, respectively.

Conclusions: Pneumonitis was more common in the QD group, and esophagitis was more common in the BID group. Although there were no significant differences in OS and LRFS between the QD and BID groups, there was a trend toward improved local control in the BID group.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus