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The Antibacterial Activity of Acetic Acid against Biofilm-Producing Pathogens of Relevance to Burns Patients.

Halstead FD, Rauf M, Moiemen NS, Bamford A, Wearn CM, Fraise AP, Lund PA, Oppenheim BA, Webber MA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Twenty-nine isolates of common wound-infecting pathogens were tested.Acetic acid was antibacterial against planktonic growth, with an minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.16-0.31% for all isolates, and was also able to prevent formation of biofilms (at 0.31%).Eradication of mature biofilms was observed for all isolates after three hours of exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom; NIHR Surgical Reconstruction and Microbiology Research Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom; Institute of Microbiology and Infection, School of Biosciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Localised infections, and burn wound sepsis are key concerns in the treatment of burns patients, and prevention of colonisation largely relies on biocides. Acetic acid has been shown to have good antibacterial activity against various planktonic organisms, however data is limited on efficacy, and few studies have been performed on biofilms.

Objectives: We sought to investigate the antibacterial activity of acetic acid against important burn wound colonising organisms growing planktonically and as biofilms.

Methods: Laboratory experiments were performed to test the ability of acetic acid to inhibit growth of pathogens, inhibit the formation of biofilms, and eradicate pre-formed biofilms.

Results: Twenty-nine isolates of common wound-infecting pathogens were tested. Acetic acid was antibacterial against planktonic growth, with an minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.16-0.31% for all isolates, and was also able to prevent formation of biofilms (at 0.31%). Eradication of mature biofilms was observed for all isolates after three hours of exposure.

Conclusions: This study provides evidence that acetic acid can inhibit growth of key burn wound pathogens when used at very dilute concentrations. Owing to current concerns of the reducing efficacy of systemic antibiotics, this novel biocide application offers great promise as a cheap and effective measure to treat infections in burns patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graph showing the MBIC results for isolates PS_919 and PS_1586.Optical density on the y axis refers to the average biofilm biomass for isolates PS_919 and PS_1586 at the range of AA dilutions tested. POS: positive control, NEG: negative (broth only) control. The error bars represent the standard error, and asterisks denote dilutions with statistically significant reductions in biofilm production according to the t-test.
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pone.0136190.g002: Graph showing the MBIC results for isolates PS_919 and PS_1586.Optical density on the y axis refers to the average biofilm biomass for isolates PS_919 and PS_1586 at the range of AA dilutions tested. POS: positive control, NEG: negative (broth only) control. The error bars represent the standard error, and asterisks denote dilutions with statistically significant reductions in biofilm production according to the t-test.

Mentions: The degree of biofilm inhibition was dose-dependent, with the MBIC representing the lowest dilution where there is no apparent biofilm, and a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) in biofilm biomass compared to the positive control. Fig 2 shows these data for two randomly selected representative strains of P. aeruginosa (PS_919 and PS_1586). Graphs showing the MBIC for all the isolates can be found in the supplementary results (S1 Fig).


The Antibacterial Activity of Acetic Acid against Biofilm-Producing Pathogens of Relevance to Burns Patients.

Halstead FD, Rauf M, Moiemen NS, Bamford A, Wearn CM, Fraise AP, Lund PA, Oppenheim BA, Webber MA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Graph showing the MBIC results for isolates PS_919 and PS_1586.Optical density on the y axis refers to the average biofilm biomass for isolates PS_919 and PS_1586 at the range of AA dilutions tested. POS: positive control, NEG: negative (broth only) control. The error bars represent the standard error, and asterisks denote dilutions with statistically significant reductions in biofilm production according to the t-test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4566994&req=5

pone.0136190.g002: Graph showing the MBIC results for isolates PS_919 and PS_1586.Optical density on the y axis refers to the average biofilm biomass for isolates PS_919 and PS_1586 at the range of AA dilutions tested. POS: positive control, NEG: negative (broth only) control. The error bars represent the standard error, and asterisks denote dilutions with statistically significant reductions in biofilm production according to the t-test.
Mentions: The degree of biofilm inhibition was dose-dependent, with the MBIC representing the lowest dilution where there is no apparent biofilm, and a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) in biofilm biomass compared to the positive control. Fig 2 shows these data for two randomly selected representative strains of P. aeruginosa (PS_919 and PS_1586). Graphs showing the MBIC for all the isolates can be found in the supplementary results (S1 Fig).

Bottom Line: Twenty-nine isolates of common wound-infecting pathogens were tested.Acetic acid was antibacterial against planktonic growth, with an minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.16-0.31% for all isolates, and was also able to prevent formation of biofilms (at 0.31%).Eradication of mature biofilms was observed for all isolates after three hours of exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom; NIHR Surgical Reconstruction and Microbiology Research Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom; Institute of Microbiology and Infection, School of Biosciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Localised infections, and burn wound sepsis are key concerns in the treatment of burns patients, and prevention of colonisation largely relies on biocides. Acetic acid has been shown to have good antibacterial activity against various planktonic organisms, however data is limited on efficacy, and few studies have been performed on biofilms.

Objectives: We sought to investigate the antibacterial activity of acetic acid against important burn wound colonising organisms growing planktonically and as biofilms.

Methods: Laboratory experiments were performed to test the ability of acetic acid to inhibit growth of pathogens, inhibit the formation of biofilms, and eradicate pre-formed biofilms.

Results: Twenty-nine isolates of common wound-infecting pathogens were tested. Acetic acid was antibacterial against planktonic growth, with an minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.16-0.31% for all isolates, and was also able to prevent formation of biofilms (at 0.31%). Eradication of mature biofilms was observed for all isolates after three hours of exposure.

Conclusions: This study provides evidence that acetic acid can inhibit growth of key burn wound pathogens when used at very dilute concentrations. Owing to current concerns of the reducing efficacy of systemic antibiotics, this novel biocide application offers great promise as a cheap and effective measure to treat infections in burns patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus