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Variation of floret fertility in hexaploid wheat revealed by tiller removal.

Guo Z, Schnurbusch T - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Notably, the green anther stage was found to consistently have the maximum floret primordia number.Detillering was able to delay floral degradation in most cases and was evidently highly associated with increased maximum floret primordia, fertile floret, and final grain number per spikelet, with only a few exceptions.Thermal time required for each floral developmental stage was overall not influenced by detillering.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HEISENBERG Research Group Plant Architecture, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Corrensstr. 3, 06466 Stadt Seeland, OT Gatersleben, Germany.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Final grain number per spikelet in apical, central and basal positions in 12 genotypes (1–12) and averages of genotypes (13) under control and detillering treatments in greenhouse (mean ± SD, n = 6).
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Figure 7: Final grain number per spikelet in apical, central and basal positions in 12 genotypes (1–12) and averages of genotypes (13) under control and detillering treatments in greenhouse (mean ± SD, n = 6).

Mentions: For the average final grain number per spikelet for all 12 genotypes, a significant difference only occurred at basal spikelets in the greenhouse (control, 2.92; detillered, 3.78; P < 0.001) and at central spikelet positions in the field (control, 3.47; detillered, 3.82 detillered; P < 0.05) (Fig. 7 and Supplementary Fig. S4). In the greenhouse, there was no significant difference between control plants and detillered plants at the apical (control, 1.34; detillered, 1.04; P > 0.1) and central (control, 2.87; detillered, 3.24; P > 0.1) spikelets. In the field, there was no significant difference between control plants and detillered plants in the apical (control, 2.53; detillered, 2.25; P > 0.1) and basal (control, 3.49; detillered, 3.63; P > 0.1) spikelets (Fig. 7 and Supplementary Table S4). Generally, in most plants, the final grain number per spikelet was also increased by detillering under both greenhouse and field conditions (Fig. 7 and Supplementary Fig. S4). The most significant and consistent increase occurred in basal spikelets in the greenhouse where the final grain number per spikelet was markedly increased in all 12 genotypes (Fig. 7). The increase in final grain number per spikelet was not seen in apical spikelets in some genotypes of detillered plants. The lower apical spikelet fertility became more evident under the detillering treatment in the greenhouse (Fig. 7). The most important difference of final grain number per spikelet compared with maximum floret primordia and fertile floret number was that apical spikelets showed a large variation because, in some cultivars, apical spikelets did not set grain at all, which meant that the final grain number per spikelet was zero. It was concluded that the increase of final grain number per spikelet in basal and central spike positions was because more apical spikelets failed to set seeds owing to the competition between spikelets in different positions. Therefore, the large variation of final grain number and reduced spikelet fertility in apical spikelets was due to preferential resource allocation to the mid-bottom part of the spike.


Variation of floret fertility in hexaploid wheat revealed by tiller removal.

Guo Z, Schnurbusch T - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Final grain number per spikelet in apical, central and basal positions in 12 genotypes (1–12) and averages of genotypes (13) under control and detillering treatments in greenhouse (mean ± SD, n = 6).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4566983&req=5

Figure 7: Final grain number per spikelet in apical, central and basal positions in 12 genotypes (1–12) and averages of genotypes (13) under control and detillering treatments in greenhouse (mean ± SD, n = 6).
Mentions: For the average final grain number per spikelet for all 12 genotypes, a significant difference only occurred at basal spikelets in the greenhouse (control, 2.92; detillered, 3.78; P < 0.001) and at central spikelet positions in the field (control, 3.47; detillered, 3.82 detillered; P < 0.05) (Fig. 7 and Supplementary Fig. S4). In the greenhouse, there was no significant difference between control plants and detillered plants at the apical (control, 1.34; detillered, 1.04; P > 0.1) and central (control, 2.87; detillered, 3.24; P > 0.1) spikelets. In the field, there was no significant difference between control plants and detillered plants in the apical (control, 2.53; detillered, 2.25; P > 0.1) and basal (control, 3.49; detillered, 3.63; P > 0.1) spikelets (Fig. 7 and Supplementary Table S4). Generally, in most plants, the final grain number per spikelet was also increased by detillering under both greenhouse and field conditions (Fig. 7 and Supplementary Fig. S4). The most significant and consistent increase occurred in basal spikelets in the greenhouse where the final grain number per spikelet was markedly increased in all 12 genotypes (Fig. 7). The increase in final grain number per spikelet was not seen in apical spikelets in some genotypes of detillered plants. The lower apical spikelet fertility became more evident under the detillering treatment in the greenhouse (Fig. 7). The most important difference of final grain number per spikelet compared with maximum floret primordia and fertile floret number was that apical spikelets showed a large variation because, in some cultivars, apical spikelets did not set grain at all, which meant that the final grain number per spikelet was zero. It was concluded that the increase of final grain number per spikelet in basal and central spike positions was because more apical spikelets failed to set seeds owing to the competition between spikelets in different positions. Therefore, the large variation of final grain number and reduced spikelet fertility in apical spikelets was due to preferential resource allocation to the mid-bottom part of the spike.

Bottom Line: Notably, the green anther stage was found to consistently have the maximum floret primordia number.Detillering was able to delay floral degradation in most cases and was evidently highly associated with increased maximum floret primordia, fertile floret, and final grain number per spikelet, with only a few exceptions.Thermal time required for each floral developmental stage was overall not influenced by detillering.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HEISENBERG Research Group Plant Architecture, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Corrensstr. 3, 06466 Stadt Seeland, OT Gatersleben, Germany.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus