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Malate as a key carbon source of leaf dark-respired CO2 across different environmental conditions in potato plants.

Lehmann MM, Rinne KT, Blessing C, Siegwolf RT, Buchmann N, Werner RA - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Dissimilation of carbon sources during plant respiration in support of metabolic processes results in the continuous release of CO2.The highest δ (13) C RS values were found in the organic acid malate under different environmental conditions, showing less negative values compared to δ (13) C R (up to 5.2‰) and compared to δ (13) C RS of soluble carbohydrates, citrate and starch (up to 8.8‰).Thus, our results strongly indicate malate as a key carbon source of (13)C enriched dark-respired CO2 in potato plants, probably driven by an anapleurotic flux replenishing intermediates of the Krebs cycle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zurich, Universitaetsstr. 2, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland marco.lehmann@alumni.ethz.ch.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Daily cycles of the carbon isotopic composition of different leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ13CRS) under different environmental conditions during the sampling period: (A) fructose, (B) glucose, (C) sucrose, (D) malate, (E) citrate, and (F) starch. Potato plants were treated with a combination of Tlow (low temperature; closed symbols), Thigh (high temperature; open symbols), and wet (circles) or dry (triangles) conditions. Results for fructose are affected by co-elution with other compounds. Grey areas indicate nighttime. Means ± SE are given (n=2–3).
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Figure 3: Daily cycles of the carbon isotopic composition of different leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ13CRS) under different environmental conditions during the sampling period: (A) fructose, (B) glucose, (C) sucrose, (D) malate, (E) citrate, and (F) starch. Potato plants were treated with a combination of Tlow (low temperature; closed symbols), Thigh (high temperature; open symbols), and wet (circles) or dry (triangles) conditions. Results for fructose are affected by co-elution with other compounds. Grey areas indicate nighttime. Means ± SE are given (n=2–3).

Mentions: Highest δ13C values in putative leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ13CRS) were found in the organic acid malate, while soluble carbohydrates (fructose, glucose and sucrose) exhibited generally lowest δ13CRS values (Fig. 3). δ13CRS of soluble carbohydrates of all treatments were in the range of −27.2‰ and −36.6‰. More negative δ13CRS values of glucose and sucrose under Thigh compared to those under Tlow were found, independent of soil moisture conditions, while less negative δ13CRS values under dry conditions compared to those under wet conditions were observed, independent of temperature treatments (Fig. 3B, C; Table 3). Significant interactions between temperature and time for δ13CRS of glucose (P=0.008, Table 3) and sucrose (P=0.003, Table 3) showed that daily cycles differed between temperatures. Additionally, soil moisture conditions caused significant temporal variations during the daily cycle in δ13CRS of sucrose (P=0.002, Table 3).


Malate as a key carbon source of leaf dark-respired CO2 across different environmental conditions in potato plants.

Lehmann MM, Rinne KT, Blessing C, Siegwolf RT, Buchmann N, Werner RA - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Daily cycles of the carbon isotopic composition of different leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ13CRS) under different environmental conditions during the sampling period: (A) fructose, (B) glucose, (C) sucrose, (D) malate, (E) citrate, and (F) starch. Potato plants were treated with a combination of Tlow (low temperature; closed symbols), Thigh (high temperature; open symbols), and wet (circles) or dry (triangles) conditions. Results for fructose are affected by co-elution with other compounds. Grey areas indicate nighttime. Means ± SE are given (n=2–3).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4566975&req=5

Figure 3: Daily cycles of the carbon isotopic composition of different leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ13CRS) under different environmental conditions during the sampling period: (A) fructose, (B) glucose, (C) sucrose, (D) malate, (E) citrate, and (F) starch. Potato plants were treated with a combination of Tlow (low temperature; closed symbols), Thigh (high temperature; open symbols), and wet (circles) or dry (triangles) conditions. Results for fructose are affected by co-elution with other compounds. Grey areas indicate nighttime. Means ± SE are given (n=2–3).
Mentions: Highest δ13C values in putative leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ13CRS) were found in the organic acid malate, while soluble carbohydrates (fructose, glucose and sucrose) exhibited generally lowest δ13CRS values (Fig. 3). δ13CRS of soluble carbohydrates of all treatments were in the range of −27.2‰ and −36.6‰. More negative δ13CRS values of glucose and sucrose under Thigh compared to those under Tlow were found, independent of soil moisture conditions, while less negative δ13CRS values under dry conditions compared to those under wet conditions were observed, independent of temperature treatments (Fig. 3B, C; Table 3). Significant interactions between temperature and time for δ13CRS of glucose (P=0.008, Table 3) and sucrose (P=0.003, Table 3) showed that daily cycles differed between temperatures. Additionally, soil moisture conditions caused significant temporal variations during the daily cycle in δ13CRS of sucrose (P=0.002, Table 3).

Bottom Line: Dissimilation of carbon sources during plant respiration in support of metabolic processes results in the continuous release of CO2.The highest δ (13) C RS values were found in the organic acid malate under different environmental conditions, showing less negative values compared to δ (13) C R (up to 5.2‰) and compared to δ (13) C RS of soluble carbohydrates, citrate and starch (up to 8.8‰).Thus, our results strongly indicate malate as a key carbon source of (13)C enriched dark-respired CO2 in potato plants, probably driven by an anapleurotic flux replenishing intermediates of the Krebs cycle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zurich, Universitaetsstr. 2, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland marco.lehmann@alumni.ethz.ch.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus