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Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue.

Smith J, Fahrenkrug J, Jørgensen HL, Christoffersen C, Goetze JP - Endocr Connect (2015)

Bottom Line: TG concentrations in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003).In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue.The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Biochemistry (KB3014) Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, 9 Blegdamsvej, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Technology Faculty of Health and Technology, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Clinical Biochemistry Faculty of Health Sciences, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Biomedical Sciences Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Clinical Medicine Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rhythmic changes in the expression of the clock genes Per1 (A) and Bmal1 (C) and the natriuretic peptide receptors NPR-A (B) and NPR-C (D) in white adipose tissue during continuous darkness. Mice were killed at 4-h intervals and mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR and normalized with two housekeeping genes (see ‘Materials and methods’ section). Values are given as means±s.e.m., n=8 at each time point (n=7 for ZT16). Fitted curves to the rhythmic changes have been drawn. The black bars at the bottom of the graphs represent the period of darkness. CT, circadian time.
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fig2: Rhythmic changes in the expression of the clock genes Per1 (A) and Bmal1 (C) and the natriuretic peptide receptors NPR-A (B) and NPR-C (D) in white adipose tissue during continuous darkness. Mice were killed at 4-h intervals and mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR and normalized with two housekeeping genes (see ‘Materials and methods’ section). Values are given as means±s.e.m., n=8 at each time point (n=7 for ZT16). Fitted curves to the rhythmic changes have been drawn. The black bars at the bottom of the graphs represent the period of darkness. CT, circadian time.

Mentions: The genes of interest were also tested on mice kept in complete darkness. For the circadian regulated clock gene Per1, mRNA contents peaked at CT12 (P<0.0001; Fig. 2A), and as expected, the temporal pattern for Bmal1 was regulated in an antiphase manner to Per1 with nadir at CT12 (P<0.0001; Fig. 2C). The mRNA contents of the receptors involved in lipolysis, NPR-A and NPR-C, are shown in Fig. 2. The lipolytic receptor NPR-A seems to be circadian regulated (P=0.001; Fig. 2B), where the expression profile is similar to the ZT mice kept in the light/darkness cycle. The clearance receptor, NPR-C, did not show a significant rhythmic expression in constant darkness (Fig. 2D).


Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue.

Smith J, Fahrenkrug J, Jørgensen HL, Christoffersen C, Goetze JP - Endocr Connect (2015)

Rhythmic changes in the expression of the clock genes Per1 (A) and Bmal1 (C) and the natriuretic peptide receptors NPR-A (B) and NPR-C (D) in white adipose tissue during continuous darkness. Mice were killed at 4-h intervals and mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR and normalized with two housekeeping genes (see ‘Materials and methods’ section). Values are given as means±s.e.m., n=8 at each time point (n=7 for ZT16). Fitted curves to the rhythmic changes have been drawn. The black bars at the bottom of the graphs represent the period of darkness. CT, circadian time.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4566841&req=5

fig2: Rhythmic changes in the expression of the clock genes Per1 (A) and Bmal1 (C) and the natriuretic peptide receptors NPR-A (B) and NPR-C (D) in white adipose tissue during continuous darkness. Mice were killed at 4-h intervals and mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR and normalized with two housekeeping genes (see ‘Materials and methods’ section). Values are given as means±s.e.m., n=8 at each time point (n=7 for ZT16). Fitted curves to the rhythmic changes have been drawn. The black bars at the bottom of the graphs represent the period of darkness. CT, circadian time.
Mentions: The genes of interest were also tested on mice kept in complete darkness. For the circadian regulated clock gene Per1, mRNA contents peaked at CT12 (P<0.0001; Fig. 2A), and as expected, the temporal pattern for Bmal1 was regulated in an antiphase manner to Per1 with nadir at CT12 (P<0.0001; Fig. 2C). The mRNA contents of the receptors involved in lipolysis, NPR-A and NPR-C, are shown in Fig. 2. The lipolytic receptor NPR-A seems to be circadian regulated (P=0.001; Fig. 2B), where the expression profile is similar to the ZT mice kept in the light/darkness cycle. The clearance receptor, NPR-C, did not show a significant rhythmic expression in constant darkness (Fig. 2D).

Bottom Line: TG concentrations in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003).In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue.The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Biochemistry (KB3014) Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, 9 Blegdamsvej, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Technology Faculty of Health and Technology, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Clinical Biochemistry Faculty of Health Sciences, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Biomedical Sciences Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Clinical Medicine Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus