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Proximate composition, mineral content and in vitro antioxidant activity of leaf and stem of Costus afer (Ginger lily).

Anyasor GN, Onajobi FD, Osilesi O, Adebawo O - J Intercult Ethnopharmacol (2014)

Bottom Line: Further study showed that the aqueous leaf fraction exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) high DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 259.07 µg/ml) and TAC (7.95 ± 0.37 mg ascorbic acid equivalent/g) compared with the other test fractions while the aqueous stem fraction had the highest TBARS scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.37 µg/ml) and inhibition of LPO (IC50 = 41.15 µg/ml) compared with the other test fractions.The findings from this study indicate that C. afer could serve as a source of nutrient and minerals for animal nutrition and human metabolism.It also showed that the aqueous fractions of C. afer leaf and stem possess high antioxidant activity than the other fractions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, Benjamin S. Carson School of Medicine, College of Health and Medical Sciences, Babcock University, Ilisan Remo, Ogun State, P.M.B. 21244 Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Aim: This study was designed to determine the proximate composition and mineral content of Costus afer leaf and stem, as well as to identify the most active antioxidant fraction.

Materials and methods: The proximate composition and mineral analysis of C. afer leaf and stem were performed using the standard methods described by Pearson and Association of Official Analytical Chemist while the 1,1 diphenyl 2 picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), lipid peroxidation (LPO), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assays were used to determine the in vitro antioxidant activity of aqueous, n-butanol, ethyl acetate and hexane fractions of C. afer leaf and stem.

Results: Proximate analysis revealed that the carbohydrate content was highest in the leaf (55.83 ± 3.71%) and stem (50.38 ± 1.27%) while crude fat content was lowest in the leaf (1.83 ± 0.43%) and stem (1.75 ± 0.48%). The minerals detected in appreciable quantity in both the leaf and stem samples were calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium, lead, manganese, nickel, and copper. Further study showed that the aqueous leaf fraction exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) high DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 259.07 µg/ml) and TAC (7.95 ± 0.37 mg ascorbic acid equivalent/g) compared with the other test fractions while the aqueous stem fraction had the highest TBARS scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.37 µg/ml) and inhibition of LPO (IC50 = 41.15 µg/ml) compared with the other test fractions.

Conclusion: The findings from this study indicate that C. afer could serve as a source of nutrient and minerals for animal nutrition and human metabolism. It also showed that the aqueous fractions of C. afer leaf and stem possess high antioxidant activity than the other fractions. In addition, this study may also explain the folkloric use of crude C. afer leaf or stem extracts in the treatment of oxidative stress associated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and hepatic disorder.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage inhibition of lipid peroxidation by different concentration of Costus afer fractions
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Figure 4: Percentage inhibition of lipid peroxidation by different concentration of Costus afer fractions

Mentions: The data in Figures 2 and 3 and Table 3 shows that the test different leaf and stem fractions, Gallic acid and ascorbic acid scavenged thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) in a concentration dependent manner. The aqueous stem (IC50 = 0.37 µg/ml) had the highest TBARS scavenging activity while butanol stem had the lowest scavenging activity of TBARS. The LPO inhibitory activity of C. afer leaf and stem fractions showed that aqueous stem fraction (IC50 = 41.15 µg/ml) had the highest inhibition of LPO while ethyl acetate stem fraction (IC50 = 60.39 µg/ml) had the lowest inhibition of LPO activity [Figure 4 and Table 3].


Proximate composition, mineral content and in vitro antioxidant activity of leaf and stem of Costus afer (Ginger lily).

Anyasor GN, Onajobi FD, Osilesi O, Adebawo O - J Intercult Ethnopharmacol (2014)

Percentage inhibition of lipid peroxidation by different concentration of Costus afer fractions
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4566670&req=5

Figure 4: Percentage inhibition of lipid peroxidation by different concentration of Costus afer fractions
Mentions: The data in Figures 2 and 3 and Table 3 shows that the test different leaf and stem fractions, Gallic acid and ascorbic acid scavenged thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) in a concentration dependent manner. The aqueous stem (IC50 = 0.37 µg/ml) had the highest TBARS scavenging activity while butanol stem had the lowest scavenging activity of TBARS. The LPO inhibitory activity of C. afer leaf and stem fractions showed that aqueous stem fraction (IC50 = 41.15 µg/ml) had the highest inhibition of LPO while ethyl acetate stem fraction (IC50 = 60.39 µg/ml) had the lowest inhibition of LPO activity [Figure 4 and Table 3].

Bottom Line: Further study showed that the aqueous leaf fraction exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) high DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 259.07 µg/ml) and TAC (7.95 ± 0.37 mg ascorbic acid equivalent/g) compared with the other test fractions while the aqueous stem fraction had the highest TBARS scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.37 µg/ml) and inhibition of LPO (IC50 = 41.15 µg/ml) compared with the other test fractions.The findings from this study indicate that C. afer could serve as a source of nutrient and minerals for animal nutrition and human metabolism.It also showed that the aqueous fractions of C. afer leaf and stem possess high antioxidant activity than the other fractions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, Benjamin S. Carson School of Medicine, College of Health and Medical Sciences, Babcock University, Ilisan Remo, Ogun State, P.M.B. 21244 Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Aim: This study was designed to determine the proximate composition and mineral content of Costus afer leaf and stem, as well as to identify the most active antioxidant fraction.

Materials and methods: The proximate composition and mineral analysis of C. afer leaf and stem were performed using the standard methods described by Pearson and Association of Official Analytical Chemist while the 1,1 diphenyl 2 picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), lipid peroxidation (LPO), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assays were used to determine the in vitro antioxidant activity of aqueous, n-butanol, ethyl acetate and hexane fractions of C. afer leaf and stem.

Results: Proximate analysis revealed that the carbohydrate content was highest in the leaf (55.83 ± 3.71%) and stem (50.38 ± 1.27%) while crude fat content was lowest in the leaf (1.83 ± 0.43%) and stem (1.75 ± 0.48%). The minerals detected in appreciable quantity in both the leaf and stem samples were calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium, lead, manganese, nickel, and copper. Further study showed that the aqueous leaf fraction exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) high DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 259.07 µg/ml) and TAC (7.95 ± 0.37 mg ascorbic acid equivalent/g) compared with the other test fractions while the aqueous stem fraction had the highest TBARS scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.37 µg/ml) and inhibition of LPO (IC50 = 41.15 µg/ml) compared with the other test fractions.

Conclusion: The findings from this study indicate that C. afer could serve as a source of nutrient and minerals for animal nutrition and human metabolism. It also showed that the aqueous fractions of C. afer leaf and stem possess high antioxidant activity than the other fractions. In addition, this study may also explain the folkloric use of crude C. afer leaf or stem extracts in the treatment of oxidative stress associated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and hepatic disorder.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus