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Low anti-ulcerogenic potentials of essential oils and methanolic extract of Croton zambesicus leaves.

Akinlolu AA, Kamaldeen GO, Francis D, Ameen MO - J Intercult Ethnopharmacol (2014)

Bottom Line: This study evaluated the anti-ulcer properties of Croton zambesicus leaves.Analyses of gastric acid assays and histopathological examinations showed dose-dependent statistically significant higher levels (P ≤ 0.05) of gastric acidity and non-restorations of the gastric mucosa layer to pre-ulceration states in rats of Groups IV-VII treated with extract doses when compared to Group III.Our study observed low anti-ulcerogenic potentials of doses of essential oils and methanolic extracts of C. zambesicus leaves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, University of Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study evaluated the anti-ulcer properties of Croton zambesicus leaves.

Materials and methods: Group I was control. 40 mg/kg/bodyweight of indomethacin (the ulcerogen) was administered to rats of Groups II-VII. 4 h after administrations of ulcerogen; rats of Groups III-VII were treated daily with oral administrations of 40 mg/kg/bodyweight of omeprazole, 5 and 10 mg/kg/bodyweight of essential oils, 250 and 500 mg/kg bodyweight of methanolic extract of C. zambesicus leaves respectively for 4 days. Rats were euthanized on day 1 (Group II) and day 5 (Groups I and III-VII); thereafter, stomach and liver samples were removed for evaluations of gastric acidity, histopathological and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) status.

Results: Analyses of gastric acid assays and histopathological examinations showed dose-dependent statistically significant higher levels (P ≤ 0.05) of gastric acidity and non-restorations of the gastric mucosa layer to pre-ulceration states in rats of Groups IV-VII treated with extract doses when compared to Group III. Statistically non-significant (Group IV) or significant (Groups V-VII) higher ALT levels (P ≤ 0.05) were observed in liver samples of rats treated with doses of essential oils and methanolic extract of C. zambesicus leaves when compared to Group II.

Conclusion: Our study observed low anti-ulcerogenic potentials of doses of essential oils and methanolic extracts of C. zambesicus leaves.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photomicrograph sample of the stomach of rats of Group VII treated with 500 mg/kg/bodyweight of methanolic extract of Croton zambesicus (H and E, ×100). Up-down arrow extends through the length of gastric mucosa layer, bent arrow points to gastric pits and glands, arrow points to muscularis mucosae and the lightning bolt points to peptic cells. All identification shapes are in green color. The cytoarchitectural components of the stomach appeared disrupted. The mucosa was eroded with multi-focal cellular necrosis, degeneration of mucus secreting cells and excessive hemorrhage of the mucosa. However, some parts of the gastric mucosa showed normal cytoarchitectural components indicating possible gradual restoration of the gastric mucosa to pre-ulceration state
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Figure 7: Photomicrograph sample of the stomach of rats of Group VII treated with 500 mg/kg/bodyweight of methanolic extract of Croton zambesicus (H and E, ×100). Up-down arrow extends through the length of gastric mucosa layer, bent arrow points to gastric pits and glands, arrow points to muscularis mucosae and the lightning bolt points to peptic cells. All identification shapes are in green color. The cytoarchitectural components of the stomach appeared disrupted. The mucosa was eroded with multi-focal cellular necrosis, degeneration of mucus secreting cells and excessive hemorrhage of the mucosa. However, some parts of the gastric mucosa showed normal cytoarchitectural components indicating possible gradual restoration of the gastric mucosa to pre-ulceration state

Mentions: Analyses of gastric acid assays and histopathological examinations showed dose-dependent statistically significant higher levels (P ≤ 0.05) of gastric acidity and non-restorations of the gastric mucosa layer to pre-ulceration states in rats of Groups IV-VII treated with extract doses of C. zambesicus leaves when compared to rats of Group III treated with 40 mg/kg bodyweight omeprazole [Table 1 and Figures 1-7]. Specifically, the cytoarchitectural components of the stomach of rats of Control Group I appeared normal while it appeared disrupted in rats of Group II which received only 80 mg/kg bodyweight Indomethacin without further treatment. In rats of Group II, the gastric mucosa components were eroded with multi-focal cellular necrosis, total degeneration of mucus secreting cells and excessive hemorrhage of the mucosa. However, the cytoarchitectural components of the stomach of rats of Group III treated with 40 mg/kg bodyweight omeprazole appeared normal though with mild hemorrhage of the gastric mucosa and few ulcerated sites. There was gradual regeneration of disrupted mucosa following indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration.


Low anti-ulcerogenic potentials of essential oils and methanolic extract of Croton zambesicus leaves.

Akinlolu AA, Kamaldeen GO, Francis D, Ameen MO - J Intercult Ethnopharmacol (2014)

Photomicrograph sample of the stomach of rats of Group VII treated with 500 mg/kg/bodyweight of methanolic extract of Croton zambesicus (H and E, ×100). Up-down arrow extends through the length of gastric mucosa layer, bent arrow points to gastric pits and glands, arrow points to muscularis mucosae and the lightning bolt points to peptic cells. All identification shapes are in green color. The cytoarchitectural components of the stomach appeared disrupted. The mucosa was eroded with multi-focal cellular necrosis, degeneration of mucus secreting cells and excessive hemorrhage of the mucosa. However, some parts of the gastric mucosa showed normal cytoarchitectural components indicating possible gradual restoration of the gastric mucosa to pre-ulceration state
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4566667&req=5

Figure 7: Photomicrograph sample of the stomach of rats of Group VII treated with 500 mg/kg/bodyweight of methanolic extract of Croton zambesicus (H and E, ×100). Up-down arrow extends through the length of gastric mucosa layer, bent arrow points to gastric pits and glands, arrow points to muscularis mucosae and the lightning bolt points to peptic cells. All identification shapes are in green color. The cytoarchitectural components of the stomach appeared disrupted. The mucosa was eroded with multi-focal cellular necrosis, degeneration of mucus secreting cells and excessive hemorrhage of the mucosa. However, some parts of the gastric mucosa showed normal cytoarchitectural components indicating possible gradual restoration of the gastric mucosa to pre-ulceration state
Mentions: Analyses of gastric acid assays and histopathological examinations showed dose-dependent statistically significant higher levels (P ≤ 0.05) of gastric acidity and non-restorations of the gastric mucosa layer to pre-ulceration states in rats of Groups IV-VII treated with extract doses of C. zambesicus leaves when compared to rats of Group III treated with 40 mg/kg bodyweight omeprazole [Table 1 and Figures 1-7]. Specifically, the cytoarchitectural components of the stomach of rats of Control Group I appeared normal while it appeared disrupted in rats of Group II which received only 80 mg/kg bodyweight Indomethacin without further treatment. In rats of Group II, the gastric mucosa components were eroded with multi-focal cellular necrosis, total degeneration of mucus secreting cells and excessive hemorrhage of the mucosa. However, the cytoarchitectural components of the stomach of rats of Group III treated with 40 mg/kg bodyweight omeprazole appeared normal though with mild hemorrhage of the gastric mucosa and few ulcerated sites. There was gradual regeneration of disrupted mucosa following indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration.

Bottom Line: This study evaluated the anti-ulcer properties of Croton zambesicus leaves.Analyses of gastric acid assays and histopathological examinations showed dose-dependent statistically significant higher levels (P ≤ 0.05) of gastric acidity and non-restorations of the gastric mucosa layer to pre-ulceration states in rats of Groups IV-VII treated with extract doses when compared to Group III.Our study observed low anti-ulcerogenic potentials of doses of essential oils and methanolic extracts of C. zambesicus leaves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, University of Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study evaluated the anti-ulcer properties of Croton zambesicus leaves.

Materials and methods: Group I was control. 40 mg/kg/bodyweight of indomethacin (the ulcerogen) was administered to rats of Groups II-VII. 4 h after administrations of ulcerogen; rats of Groups III-VII were treated daily with oral administrations of 40 mg/kg/bodyweight of omeprazole, 5 and 10 mg/kg/bodyweight of essential oils, 250 and 500 mg/kg bodyweight of methanolic extract of C. zambesicus leaves respectively for 4 days. Rats were euthanized on day 1 (Group II) and day 5 (Groups I and III-VII); thereafter, stomach and liver samples were removed for evaluations of gastric acidity, histopathological and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) status.

Results: Analyses of gastric acid assays and histopathological examinations showed dose-dependent statistically significant higher levels (P ≤ 0.05) of gastric acidity and non-restorations of the gastric mucosa layer to pre-ulceration states in rats of Groups IV-VII treated with extract doses when compared to Group III. Statistically non-significant (Group IV) or significant (Groups V-VII) higher ALT levels (P ≤ 0.05) were observed in liver samples of rats treated with doses of essential oils and methanolic extract of C. zambesicus leaves when compared to Group II.

Conclusion: Our study observed low anti-ulcerogenic potentials of doses of essential oils and methanolic extracts of C. zambesicus leaves.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus