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Zwitterionic Nanofibers of Super-Glue for Transparent and Biocompatible Multi-Purpose Coatings.

Mele E, Heredia-Guerrero JA, Bayer IS, Ciofani G, Genchi GG, Ceseracciu L, Davis A, Papadopoulou EL, Barthel MJ, Marini L, Ruffilli R, Athanassiou A - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The resulting fibrous networks are thermally treated on glass in order to create transparent coatings whose superficial morphology recalls the organization of the initial electrospun mats.The inherent texture of the coatings positively affects their biocompatibility.In fact, they are able to promote the proliferation and differentiation of myoblast stem cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Smart Materials, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego 30, 16163 Genoa, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Here we show that macrozwitterions of poly(ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate), commonly called Super Glue, can easily assemble into long and well defined fibers by electrospinning. The resulting fibrous networks are thermally treated on glass in order to create transparent coatings whose superficial morphology recalls the organization of the initial electrospun mats. These textured coatings are characterized by low liquid adhesion and anti-staining performance. Furthermore, the low friction coefficient and excellent scratch resistance make them attractive as solid lubricants. The inherent texture of the coatings positively affects their biocompatibility. In fact, they are able to promote the proliferation and differentiation of myoblast stem cells. Optically-transparent and biocompatible coatings that simultaneously possess characteristics of low water contact angle hysteresis, low friction and mechanical robustness can find application in a wide range of technological sectors, from the construction and automotive industries to electronic and biomedical devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transparent coatings from thermally-treated PECA fibers.(a) TGA thermogram and relative derivative curve (inset) of the PECA fibers. (b) SEM image of the textured PECA coating produced by thermally treating the electrospun fibers at 150 °C. (c) Optical transmission spectra of the glass substrate (white circles) and of the electrospun mat deposited on the glass substrate before (solid black curve) and after (solid green curve) the thermal treatment. (d) Photograph of the as-prepared PECA fibers on the glass substrate (sample on the left) and of the textured thermally-treated coating on the glass substrate (sample on the right). Scale bar = 0.5 cm. Use of the institutional logo with permission of Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia.
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f3: Transparent coatings from thermally-treated PECA fibers.(a) TGA thermogram and relative derivative curve (inset) of the PECA fibers. (b) SEM image of the textured PECA coating produced by thermally treating the electrospun fibers at 150 °C. (c) Optical transmission spectra of the glass substrate (white circles) and of the electrospun mat deposited on the glass substrate before (solid black curve) and after (solid green curve) the thermal treatment. (d) Photograph of the as-prepared PECA fibers on the glass substrate (sample on the left) and of the textured thermally-treated coating on the glass substrate (sample on the right). Scale bar = 0.5 cm. Use of the institutional logo with permission of Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia.

Mentions: The produced PECA fibers were used for the creation of textured coatings with special wetting properties. Initially, glass substrates were uniformly coated with layers of PECA nanofibers and then thermally treated at 150 °C for 20 s on a hot plate. The temperature for the treatment of the fibrous networks was selected in order to obtain coatings with a high degree of optical transparency, while limiting the thermal degradation of the polymer. TGA measurements in Fig. 3a indicate that the PECA electrospun mats had the maximum degradation at 210 °C, and they completely degraded at 300 °C, in agreement with previous reports on PECA2930. We measured a weight loss of 35% at 150 °C, mainly due to the complete evaporation of water that was trapped inside the porosity of the electrospun web (at a temperature lower than 100 °C) and only partially due to the thermal degradation of the PECA fibers. Real-time observations of the dynamics of the formation of the textured PECA coatings (Figure S2 in the Supplementary Information) show, as expected, that the fusion of the fibers started from the layers closer to the substrate, which were in direct contact with the heating source. Then, it propagated through the upper layers of fibers. As result, the fibers fused together, forming interconnected features that recalled the entangled geometry of the initial fibrous network (Fig. 3b). It is worth noting that the produced micro-structured coatings were highly transparent to visible light, with a transmission spectrum (solid green line in Fig. 3c) comparable to that of the pristine glass substrate (white circles in Fig. 3c). In fact, the thickness (lower than 100 nm) and the low surface roughness of the coatings guaranteed a reduced scattering of the light, leading to high transparency31. On the contrary the glass slide coated with the PECA fibers, before the thermal treatment, was optically opaque (solid black line in Fig. 3c). A direct comparison between the as-prepared (sample on the left) and treated (sample on the right) fibrous network is shown in Fig. 3d.


Zwitterionic Nanofibers of Super-Glue for Transparent and Biocompatible Multi-Purpose Coatings.

Mele E, Heredia-Guerrero JA, Bayer IS, Ciofani G, Genchi GG, Ceseracciu L, Davis A, Papadopoulou EL, Barthel MJ, Marini L, Ruffilli R, Athanassiou A - Sci Rep (2015)

Transparent coatings from thermally-treated PECA fibers.(a) TGA thermogram and relative derivative curve (inset) of the PECA fibers. (b) SEM image of the textured PECA coating produced by thermally treating the electrospun fibers at 150 °C. (c) Optical transmission spectra of the glass substrate (white circles) and of the electrospun mat deposited on the glass substrate before (solid black curve) and after (solid green curve) the thermal treatment. (d) Photograph of the as-prepared PECA fibers on the glass substrate (sample on the left) and of the textured thermally-treated coating on the glass substrate (sample on the right). Scale bar = 0.5 cm. Use of the institutional logo with permission of Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4566136&req=5

f3: Transparent coatings from thermally-treated PECA fibers.(a) TGA thermogram and relative derivative curve (inset) of the PECA fibers. (b) SEM image of the textured PECA coating produced by thermally treating the electrospun fibers at 150 °C. (c) Optical transmission spectra of the glass substrate (white circles) and of the electrospun mat deposited on the glass substrate before (solid black curve) and after (solid green curve) the thermal treatment. (d) Photograph of the as-prepared PECA fibers on the glass substrate (sample on the left) and of the textured thermally-treated coating on the glass substrate (sample on the right). Scale bar = 0.5 cm. Use of the institutional logo with permission of Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia.
Mentions: The produced PECA fibers were used for the creation of textured coatings with special wetting properties. Initially, glass substrates were uniformly coated with layers of PECA nanofibers and then thermally treated at 150 °C for 20 s on a hot plate. The temperature for the treatment of the fibrous networks was selected in order to obtain coatings with a high degree of optical transparency, while limiting the thermal degradation of the polymer. TGA measurements in Fig. 3a indicate that the PECA electrospun mats had the maximum degradation at 210 °C, and they completely degraded at 300 °C, in agreement with previous reports on PECA2930. We measured a weight loss of 35% at 150 °C, mainly due to the complete evaporation of water that was trapped inside the porosity of the electrospun web (at a temperature lower than 100 °C) and only partially due to the thermal degradation of the PECA fibers. Real-time observations of the dynamics of the formation of the textured PECA coatings (Figure S2 in the Supplementary Information) show, as expected, that the fusion of the fibers started from the layers closer to the substrate, which were in direct contact with the heating source. Then, it propagated through the upper layers of fibers. As result, the fibers fused together, forming interconnected features that recalled the entangled geometry of the initial fibrous network (Fig. 3b). It is worth noting that the produced micro-structured coatings were highly transparent to visible light, with a transmission spectrum (solid green line in Fig. 3c) comparable to that of the pristine glass substrate (white circles in Fig. 3c). In fact, the thickness (lower than 100 nm) and the low surface roughness of the coatings guaranteed a reduced scattering of the light, leading to high transparency31. On the contrary the glass slide coated with the PECA fibers, before the thermal treatment, was optically opaque (solid black line in Fig. 3c). A direct comparison between the as-prepared (sample on the left) and treated (sample on the right) fibrous network is shown in Fig. 3d.

Bottom Line: The resulting fibrous networks are thermally treated on glass in order to create transparent coatings whose superficial morphology recalls the organization of the initial electrospun mats.The inherent texture of the coatings positively affects their biocompatibility.In fact, they are able to promote the proliferation and differentiation of myoblast stem cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Smart Materials, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego 30, 16163 Genoa, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Here we show that macrozwitterions of poly(ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate), commonly called Super Glue, can easily assemble into long and well defined fibers by electrospinning. The resulting fibrous networks are thermally treated on glass in order to create transparent coatings whose superficial morphology recalls the organization of the initial electrospun mats. These textured coatings are characterized by low liquid adhesion and anti-staining performance. Furthermore, the low friction coefficient and excellent scratch resistance make them attractive as solid lubricants. The inherent texture of the coatings positively affects their biocompatibility. In fact, they are able to promote the proliferation and differentiation of myoblast stem cells. Optically-transparent and biocompatible coatings that simultaneously possess characteristics of low water contact angle hysteresis, low friction and mechanical robustness can find application in a wide range of technological sectors, from the construction and automotive industries to electronic and biomedical devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus