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Sleep patterns in Amazon rubber tappers with and without electric light at home.

Moreno CR, Vasconcelos S, Marqueze EC, Lowden A, Middleton B, Fischer FM, Louzada FM, Skene DJ - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Questionnaire data (Phase 1) revealed that rubber tappers with availability of electric light had significantly shorter sleep on work days (30 min/day less) than those without electric light.Analysis of the data from the Phase 2 sample showed a significant delay in the timing of melatonin onset in workers with electric light compared to those without electric light (p < 0.01).Electric lighting delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration during the work week and appears to interfere with alignment of the circadian timing system to the natural light/dark cycle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Today's modern society is exposed to artificial electric lighting in addition to the natural light-dark cycle. Studies assessing the impact of electric light exposure on sleep and its relation to work hours are rare due to the ubiquitous presence of electricity. Here we report a unique study conducted in two phases in a homogenous group of rubber tappers living and working in a remote area of the Amazon forest, comparing those living without electric light (n = 243 in first phase; n = 25 in second phase) to those with electric light at home (n = 97 in first phase; n = 17 in second phase). Questionnaire data (Phase 1) revealed that rubber tappers with availability of electric light had significantly shorter sleep on work days (30 min/day less) than those without electric light. Analysis of the data from the Phase 2 sample showed a significant delay in the timing of melatonin onset in workers with electric light compared to those without electric light (p < 0.01). Electric lighting delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration during the work week and appears to interfere with alignment of the circadian timing system to the natural light/dark cycle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Habitual sleep timing based on questionnaire data (Phase 1) during work days and days-off of rubber tappers with (n = 97) and without (n = 243) electric light at home.All times indicate the official local time.
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f1: Habitual sleep timing based on questionnaire data (Phase 1) during work days and days-off of rubber tappers with (n = 97) and without (n = 243) electric light at home.All times indicate the official local time.

Mentions: Questionnaire data (subjective data) from the whole sample (n = 340; Phase 1) revealed that workers with electric light at home went to sleep significantly later (21:01 h) than those without electric light (20:21 h, p < 0.01, Fig. 1) during the work week, as well as during days-off (21:08 h and 20:30 h, respectively; p < 0.01). On days-off, workers with electric light also woke up significantly later (05:35 h) than those without electric light (05:16 h) (Fig. 1). Wake up times during the work week were similar for both groups, in agreement with their reported work hours.


Sleep patterns in Amazon rubber tappers with and without electric light at home.

Moreno CR, Vasconcelos S, Marqueze EC, Lowden A, Middleton B, Fischer FM, Louzada FM, Skene DJ - Sci Rep (2015)

Habitual sleep timing based on questionnaire data (Phase 1) during work days and days-off of rubber tappers with (n = 97) and without (n = 243) electric light at home.All times indicate the official local time.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4566125&req=5

f1: Habitual sleep timing based on questionnaire data (Phase 1) during work days and days-off of rubber tappers with (n = 97) and without (n = 243) electric light at home.All times indicate the official local time.
Mentions: Questionnaire data (subjective data) from the whole sample (n = 340; Phase 1) revealed that workers with electric light at home went to sleep significantly later (21:01 h) than those without electric light (20:21 h, p < 0.01, Fig. 1) during the work week, as well as during days-off (21:08 h and 20:30 h, respectively; p < 0.01). On days-off, workers with electric light also woke up significantly later (05:35 h) than those without electric light (05:16 h) (Fig. 1). Wake up times during the work week were similar for both groups, in agreement with their reported work hours.

Bottom Line: Questionnaire data (Phase 1) revealed that rubber tappers with availability of electric light had significantly shorter sleep on work days (30 min/day less) than those without electric light.Analysis of the data from the Phase 2 sample showed a significant delay in the timing of melatonin onset in workers with electric light compared to those without electric light (p < 0.01).Electric lighting delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration during the work week and appears to interfere with alignment of the circadian timing system to the natural light/dark cycle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Today's modern society is exposed to artificial electric lighting in addition to the natural light-dark cycle. Studies assessing the impact of electric light exposure on sleep and its relation to work hours are rare due to the ubiquitous presence of electricity. Here we report a unique study conducted in two phases in a homogenous group of rubber tappers living and working in a remote area of the Amazon forest, comparing those living without electric light (n = 243 in first phase; n = 25 in second phase) to those with electric light at home (n = 97 in first phase; n = 17 in second phase). Questionnaire data (Phase 1) revealed that rubber tappers with availability of electric light had significantly shorter sleep on work days (30 min/day less) than those without electric light. Analysis of the data from the Phase 2 sample showed a significant delay in the timing of melatonin onset in workers with electric light compared to those without electric light (p < 0.01). Electric lighting delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration during the work week and appears to interfere with alignment of the circadian timing system to the natural light/dark cycle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus