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Reactive oxygen species, nutrition, hypoxia and diseases: Problems solved?

Görlach A, Dimova EY, Petry A, Martínez-Ruiz A, Hernansanz-Agustín P, Rolo AP, Palmeira CM, Kietzmann T - Redox Biol (2015)

Bottom Line: Within the last twenty years the view on reactive oxygen species (ROS) has changed; they are no longer only considered to be harmful but also necessary for cellular communication and homeostasis in different organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals.During the last 60-100 years the life style, at least in the Western world, has changed enormously.This became obvious with an increase in caloric intake, decreased energy expenditure as well as the appearance of alcoholism and smoking; These changes were shown to contribute to generation of ROS which are, at least in part, associated with the occurrence of several chronic diseases like adiposity, atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, and cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental and Molecular Pediatric Cardiology, German Heart Center Munich, Technical University Munich, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Interrelation between ROS in signaling and cell damage. ROS generated in cells by specific action of various enzymes appear to have a more critical role in signaling than ROS generated as by-products of intracellular processes or due to external toxic stimuli. ETC, electron transport chain. PDH, pyruvate dehydrogenase; KGDH, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase.
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f0010: Interrelation between ROS in signaling and cell damage. ROS generated in cells by specific action of various enzymes appear to have a more critical role in signaling than ROS generated as by-products of intracellular processes or due to external toxic stimuli. ETC, electron transport chain. PDH, pyruvate dehydrogenase; KGDH, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase.

Mentions: The harmful action of ROS is primarily due to their ability to oxidize and subsequently damage DNA, proteins and (membrane) lipids (Fig. 2). Among the ROS, ·OH are known to mainly damage DNA by reacting with all four bases whereas 1O2 selectively attacks guanine [56]; and H2O2 contribute indirectly to DNA damage by forming ·OH and lipid peroxides which contribute to formation of DNA adducts [57]. Again, most protein damage is exerted due to the action of ·OH at the protein polypeptide backbone [58]; as a consequence, further radicals such as peroxyl, alkylperoxide, or alkoxyl radicals are formed [59].


Reactive oxygen species, nutrition, hypoxia and diseases: Problems solved?

Görlach A, Dimova EY, Petry A, Martínez-Ruiz A, Hernansanz-Agustín P, Rolo AP, Palmeira CM, Kietzmann T - Redox Biol (2015)

Interrelation between ROS in signaling and cell damage. ROS generated in cells by specific action of various enzymes appear to have a more critical role in signaling than ROS generated as by-products of intracellular processes or due to external toxic stimuli. ETC, electron transport chain. PDH, pyruvate dehydrogenase; KGDH, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4565025&req=5

f0010: Interrelation between ROS in signaling and cell damage. ROS generated in cells by specific action of various enzymes appear to have a more critical role in signaling than ROS generated as by-products of intracellular processes or due to external toxic stimuli. ETC, electron transport chain. PDH, pyruvate dehydrogenase; KGDH, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase.
Mentions: The harmful action of ROS is primarily due to their ability to oxidize and subsequently damage DNA, proteins and (membrane) lipids (Fig. 2). Among the ROS, ·OH are known to mainly damage DNA by reacting with all four bases whereas 1O2 selectively attacks guanine [56]; and H2O2 contribute indirectly to DNA damage by forming ·OH and lipid peroxides which contribute to formation of DNA adducts [57]. Again, most protein damage is exerted due to the action of ·OH at the protein polypeptide backbone [58]; as a consequence, further radicals such as peroxyl, alkylperoxide, or alkoxyl radicals are formed [59].

Bottom Line: Within the last twenty years the view on reactive oxygen species (ROS) has changed; they are no longer only considered to be harmful but also necessary for cellular communication and homeostasis in different organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals.During the last 60-100 years the life style, at least in the Western world, has changed enormously.This became obvious with an increase in caloric intake, decreased energy expenditure as well as the appearance of alcoholism and smoking; These changes were shown to contribute to generation of ROS which are, at least in part, associated with the occurrence of several chronic diseases like adiposity, atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, and cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental and Molecular Pediatric Cardiology, German Heart Center Munich, Technical University Munich, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus