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An objective measure of hyperactivity aspects with compressed webcam video.

Wehrmann T, Müller JM - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2015)

Bottom Line: After controlling for age-related confounders, the video-activity score showed not the expected association with clinicians' or parents' hyperactivity ratings.Our preliminary conclusion is that our video-activity score assesses physical activity but not specific information related to hyperactivity.The general problem of defining and assessing hyperactivity with objective criteria remains.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital Münster, Schmeddingstrasse 50, 48149 Münster, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Objective measures of physical activity are currently not considered in clinical guidelines for the assessment of hyperactivity in the context of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) due to low and inconsistent associations between clinical ratings, missing age-related norm data and high technical requirements.

Methods: This pilot study introduces a new objective measure for physical activity using compressed webcam video footage, which should be less affected by age-related variables. A pre-test established a preliminary standard procedure for testing a clinical sample of 39 children aged 6-16 years (21 with a clinical ADHD diagnosis, 18 without). Subjects were filmed for 6 min while solving a standardized cognitive performance task. Our webcam video-based video-activity score was compared with respect to two independent video-based movement ratings by students, ratings of Inattentiveness, Hyperactivity and Impulsivity by clinicians (DCL-ADHS) giving a clinical diagnosis of ADHD and parents (FBB-ADHD) and physical features (age, weight, height, BMI) using mean scores, correlations and multiple regression.

Results: Our video-activity score showed a high agreement (r = 0.81) with video-based movement ratings, but also considerable associations with age-related physical attributes. After controlling for age-related confounders, the video-activity score showed not the expected association with clinicians' or parents' hyperactivity ratings.

Conclusions: Our preliminary conclusion is that our video-activity score assesses physical activity but not specific information related to hyperactivity. The general problem of defining and assessing hyperactivity with objective criteria remains.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Webcam recording setting. Figure 1 shows the general setup used to record movement. The camera adjustment is shown on the left. The distance to each subject was detected by barely capturing the scalp and feet while placing the camera on a table approximately 50 cm above the ground. On the right side, a picture of a sequence is shown. The camera was adjusted so that each subject was sitting roughly in the middle of the frame
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Fig2: Webcam recording setting. Figure 1 shows the general setup used to record movement. The camera adjustment is shown on the left. The distance to each subject was detected by barely capturing the scalp and feet while placing the camera on a table approximately 50 cm above the ground. On the right side, a picture of a sequence is shown. The camera was adjusted so that each subject was sitting roughly in the middle of the frame

Mentions: Video recording setup Figure 2 shows our general setup. The webcam was placed on a Table 50 cm above the ground and directly in front of the seated subjects to assure a frontal video capture of each subject. It was adjusted so that the feet and the scalp were barely in the picture, with the subject in the middle. This setting was used for two reasons: First, the differing body height in the sample should not influence the measure of change in this way and bigger subjects fill in the screen more than small children. Without these precautions, a small amount of movement from large subjects could lead to more changes in the file size compared to a larger amount of movement from small subjects. Thus, differences in height, weight and age should be reduced, and the measure should be comparable for different subsamples. Second, this standardization should lead to a fast and easy, but comparable, standard setup. The video background was a white wall, and testing was conducted in daylight conditions. The investigator hid behind the computer, without permitting eye contact and remained quiet to prevent additional influences during the test. The video capture was started simultaneously with the audio recording of the task to synchronize the video capture.Fig. 2


An objective measure of hyperactivity aspects with compressed webcam video.

Wehrmann T, Müller JM - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2015)

Webcam recording setting. Figure 1 shows the general setup used to record movement. The camera adjustment is shown on the left. The distance to each subject was detected by barely capturing the scalp and feet while placing the camera on a table approximately 50 cm above the ground. On the right side, a picture of a sequence is shown. The camera was adjusted so that each subject was sitting roughly in the middle of the frame
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4565011&req=5

Fig2: Webcam recording setting. Figure 1 shows the general setup used to record movement. The camera adjustment is shown on the left. The distance to each subject was detected by barely capturing the scalp and feet while placing the camera on a table approximately 50 cm above the ground. On the right side, a picture of a sequence is shown. The camera was adjusted so that each subject was sitting roughly in the middle of the frame
Mentions: Video recording setup Figure 2 shows our general setup. The webcam was placed on a Table 50 cm above the ground and directly in front of the seated subjects to assure a frontal video capture of each subject. It was adjusted so that the feet and the scalp were barely in the picture, with the subject in the middle. This setting was used for two reasons: First, the differing body height in the sample should not influence the measure of change in this way and bigger subjects fill in the screen more than small children. Without these precautions, a small amount of movement from large subjects could lead to more changes in the file size compared to a larger amount of movement from small subjects. Thus, differences in height, weight and age should be reduced, and the measure should be comparable for different subsamples. Second, this standardization should lead to a fast and easy, but comparable, standard setup. The video background was a white wall, and testing was conducted in daylight conditions. The investigator hid behind the computer, without permitting eye contact and remained quiet to prevent additional influences during the test. The video capture was started simultaneously with the audio recording of the task to synchronize the video capture.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: After controlling for age-related confounders, the video-activity score showed not the expected association with clinicians' or parents' hyperactivity ratings.Our preliminary conclusion is that our video-activity score assesses physical activity but not specific information related to hyperactivity.The general problem of defining and assessing hyperactivity with objective criteria remains.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital Münster, Schmeddingstrasse 50, 48149 Münster, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Objective measures of physical activity are currently not considered in clinical guidelines for the assessment of hyperactivity in the context of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) due to low and inconsistent associations between clinical ratings, missing age-related norm data and high technical requirements.

Methods: This pilot study introduces a new objective measure for physical activity using compressed webcam video footage, which should be less affected by age-related variables. A pre-test established a preliminary standard procedure for testing a clinical sample of 39 children aged 6-16 years (21 with a clinical ADHD diagnosis, 18 without). Subjects were filmed for 6 min while solving a standardized cognitive performance task. Our webcam video-based video-activity score was compared with respect to two independent video-based movement ratings by students, ratings of Inattentiveness, Hyperactivity and Impulsivity by clinicians (DCL-ADHS) giving a clinical diagnosis of ADHD and parents (FBB-ADHD) and physical features (age, weight, height, BMI) using mean scores, correlations and multiple regression.

Results: Our video-activity score showed a high agreement (r = 0.81) with video-based movement ratings, but also considerable associations with age-related physical attributes. After controlling for age-related confounders, the video-activity score showed not the expected association with clinicians' or parents' hyperactivity ratings.

Conclusions: Our preliminary conclusion is that our video-activity score assesses physical activity but not specific information related to hyperactivity. The general problem of defining and assessing hyperactivity with objective criteria remains.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus