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Merkel cell carcinoma presenting as malignant ascites: A case report and review of literature.

Policarpio-Nicolas ML, Avery DL, Hartley T - Cytojournal (2015)

Bottom Line: To the best of our knowledge, we present the first cytological diagnosis of MCC metastatic to the ascitic fluid.We describe the cytologic findings as well as the immunohistochemical stains supportive of the diagnosis.Given the fatal prognosis of this tumor compared to melanoma and rarity of its occurrence in ascitic fluid, awareness of this tumor and use of immunohistochemical stains are critical in arriving at the diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Address: Department of Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA.

ABSTRACT
The most common site of metastasis to ascitic fluid in females is from a mullerian (ovarian) primary, whereas in males it is from the gastrointestinal tract. Metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) to the ascitic fluid is extremely rare and may present as a diagnostic challenge on effusion cytology. In a review of the literature, there are only two case reports of metastatic MCC in pleural effusion. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first cytological diagnosis of MCC metastatic to the ascitic fluid. We describe the cytologic findings as well as the immunohistochemical stains supportive of the diagnosis. Given the fatal prognosis of this tumor compared to melanoma and rarity of its occurrence in ascitic fluid, awareness of this tumor and use of immunohistochemical stains are critical in arriving at the diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Malignant cells arranged in clusters with occasional mitotic figures (Papanicolaou, ×600)
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Figure 2: Malignant cells arranged in clusters with occasional mitotic figures (Papanicolaou, ×600)

Mentions: The thin prep smears stained with Papanicolaou showed malignant cells arranged singly [Figure 1], in clusters [Figure 2] and occasional single-file pattern [Figure 3]. The individual cells showed round to oval nuclei, irregular nuclear borders, stippled chromatin pattern, inconspicuous nucleoli, and scant cytoplasm [Figure 1]. Mitotic figures were identified [Figure 2]. Occasional nuclear molding was present.


Merkel cell carcinoma presenting as malignant ascites: A case report and review of literature.

Policarpio-Nicolas ML, Avery DL, Hartley T - Cytojournal (2015)

Malignant cells arranged in clusters with occasional mitotic figures (Papanicolaou, ×600)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4564912&req=5

Figure 2: Malignant cells arranged in clusters with occasional mitotic figures (Papanicolaou, ×600)
Mentions: The thin prep smears stained with Papanicolaou showed malignant cells arranged singly [Figure 1], in clusters [Figure 2] and occasional single-file pattern [Figure 3]. The individual cells showed round to oval nuclei, irregular nuclear borders, stippled chromatin pattern, inconspicuous nucleoli, and scant cytoplasm [Figure 1]. Mitotic figures were identified [Figure 2]. Occasional nuclear molding was present.

Bottom Line: To the best of our knowledge, we present the first cytological diagnosis of MCC metastatic to the ascitic fluid.We describe the cytologic findings as well as the immunohistochemical stains supportive of the diagnosis.Given the fatal prognosis of this tumor compared to melanoma and rarity of its occurrence in ascitic fluid, awareness of this tumor and use of immunohistochemical stains are critical in arriving at the diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Address: Department of Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA.

ABSTRACT
The most common site of metastasis to ascitic fluid in females is from a mullerian (ovarian) primary, whereas in males it is from the gastrointestinal tract. Metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) to the ascitic fluid is extremely rare and may present as a diagnostic challenge on effusion cytology. In a review of the literature, there are only two case reports of metastatic MCC in pleural effusion. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first cytological diagnosis of MCC metastatic to the ascitic fluid. We describe the cytologic findings as well as the immunohistochemical stains supportive of the diagnosis. Given the fatal prognosis of this tumor compared to melanoma and rarity of its occurrence in ascitic fluid, awareness of this tumor and use of immunohistochemical stains are critical in arriving at the diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus