Limits...
Increased mortality after upper extremity fracture requiring inpatient care.

Somersalo A, Paloneva J, Kautiainen H, Lönnroos E, Heinänen M, Kiviranta I - Acta Orthop (2015)

Bottom Line: The SMR decreased with advancing age, and the mortality rate was highest for men with humerus fractures.In men, the risk of death related to proximal humerus fracture was even higher than that reported previously for hip fracture.Compared to the general population, the SMR was double for humerus fracture patients, whereas wrist fracture had no effect on mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a 1 Orthopaedics and Traumatology , University of Helsinki, Helsinki.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Increased mortality after hip fracture is well documented. The mortality after hospitalization for upper extremity fracture is unknown, even though these are common injuries. Here we determined mortality after hospitalization for upper extremity fracture in patients aged ≥16 years.

Patients and methods: We collected data about the diagnosis code (ICD10), procedure code (NOMESCO), and 7 additional characteristics of 5,985 patients admitted to the trauma ward of Central Finland Hospital between 2002 and 2008. During the study, 929 women and 753 men sustained an upper extremity fracture. The patients were followed up until the end of 2012. Mortality rates were calculated using data on the population at risk.

Results: By the end of follow-up (mean duration 6 years), 179 women (19%) and 105 men (14%) had died. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all patients was 1.5 (95% CI: 1.4-1.7). The SMR was higher for men (2.1, CI: 1.7-2.5) than for women (1.3, CI: 1.1-1.5) (p < 0.001). The SMR decreased with advancing age, and the mortality rate was highest for men with humerus fractures.

Interpretation: In men, the risk of death related to proximal humerus fracture was even higher than that reported previously for hip fracture. Compared to the general population, the SMR was double for humerus fracture patients, whereas wrist fracture had no effect on mortality.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Standardized mortality ratios for 1,682 patients hospitalized for upper extremity fracture, by age group, with 95% confidence intervals. The dashed line represents the expected survival in the general population (standardized mortality ratio = 1).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4564776&req=5

Figure 3: Standardized mortality ratios for 1,682 patients hospitalized for upper extremity fracture, by age group, with 95% confidence intervals. The dashed line represents the expected survival in the general population (standardized mortality ratio = 1).

Mentions: The relative survival of both women and men decreased linearly with time (Figure 2). The SMR for all patients was 1.5 (CI: 1.4–1.7). The SMR for women was 1.3 (CI: 1.1–1.5) and for men it was 2.1 (CI: 1.7–2.5) (p < 0.001). The SMR for upper extremity fracture patients decreased with advancing age (Figure 3). In patients younger than 60 years, the SMR was 2.2 (CI: 1.3–3.7) for women and 3.0 (CI: 2.3–4.1) for men. In patients who were 60 years old or more, the corresponding SMR values for women and men were 1.2 (CI: 1.1–1.5) and 1.6 (CI: 1.3–2.1).


Increased mortality after upper extremity fracture requiring inpatient care.

Somersalo A, Paloneva J, Kautiainen H, Lönnroos E, Heinänen M, Kiviranta I - Acta Orthop (2015)

Standardized mortality ratios for 1,682 patients hospitalized for upper extremity fracture, by age group, with 95% confidence intervals. The dashed line represents the expected survival in the general population (standardized mortality ratio = 1).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4564776&req=5

Figure 3: Standardized mortality ratios for 1,682 patients hospitalized for upper extremity fracture, by age group, with 95% confidence intervals. The dashed line represents the expected survival in the general population (standardized mortality ratio = 1).
Mentions: The relative survival of both women and men decreased linearly with time (Figure 2). The SMR for all patients was 1.5 (CI: 1.4–1.7). The SMR for women was 1.3 (CI: 1.1–1.5) and for men it was 2.1 (CI: 1.7–2.5) (p < 0.001). The SMR for upper extremity fracture patients decreased with advancing age (Figure 3). In patients younger than 60 years, the SMR was 2.2 (CI: 1.3–3.7) for women and 3.0 (CI: 2.3–4.1) for men. In patients who were 60 years old or more, the corresponding SMR values for women and men were 1.2 (CI: 1.1–1.5) and 1.6 (CI: 1.3–2.1).

Bottom Line: The SMR decreased with advancing age, and the mortality rate was highest for men with humerus fractures.In men, the risk of death related to proximal humerus fracture was even higher than that reported previously for hip fracture.Compared to the general population, the SMR was double for humerus fracture patients, whereas wrist fracture had no effect on mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a 1 Orthopaedics and Traumatology , University of Helsinki, Helsinki.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Increased mortality after hip fracture is well documented. The mortality after hospitalization for upper extremity fracture is unknown, even though these are common injuries. Here we determined mortality after hospitalization for upper extremity fracture in patients aged ≥16 years.

Patients and methods: We collected data about the diagnosis code (ICD10), procedure code (NOMESCO), and 7 additional characteristics of 5,985 patients admitted to the trauma ward of Central Finland Hospital between 2002 and 2008. During the study, 929 women and 753 men sustained an upper extremity fracture. The patients were followed up until the end of 2012. Mortality rates were calculated using data on the population at risk.

Results: By the end of follow-up (mean duration 6 years), 179 women (19%) and 105 men (14%) had died. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all patients was 1.5 (95% CI: 1.4-1.7). The SMR was higher for men (2.1, CI: 1.7-2.5) than for women (1.3, CI: 1.1-1.5) (p < 0.001). The SMR decreased with advancing age, and the mortality rate was highest for men with humerus fractures.

Interpretation: In men, the risk of death related to proximal humerus fracture was even higher than that reported previously for hip fracture. Compared to the general population, the SMR was double for humerus fracture patients, whereas wrist fracture had no effect on mortality.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus