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Suppressing Nitrite-oxidizing Bacteria Growth to Achieve Nitrogen Removal from Domestic Wastewater via Anammox Using Intermittent Aeration with Low Dissolved Oxygen.

Ma B, Bao P, Wei Y, Zhu G, Yuan Z, Peng Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Achieving nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater using anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has the potential to make wastewater treatment energy-neutral or even energy-positive.The results showed that NOB was successfully suppressed using that method, with the relative abundance of NOB maintained between 2.0-2.6%, based on Fluorescent in-situ Hybridization.Nitrogen could be effectively removed from domestic wastewater with anammox at a temperature above 20 °C, with an effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration of 6.6 ± 2.7 mg/L, while the influent TN and soluble chemical oxygen demand were 62.6 ± 3.1 mg/L and 88.0 ± 8.1 mg/L, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Beijing Water Quality Science and Water Environment Recovery Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Achieving nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater using anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has the potential to make wastewater treatment energy-neutral or even energy-positive. The challenge is to suppress the growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). This study presents a promising method based on intermittent aeration with low dissolved oxygen to limit NOB growth, thereby providing an advantage to anammox bacteria to form a partnership with the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The results showed that NOB was successfully suppressed using that method, with the relative abundance of NOB maintained between 2.0-2.6%, based on Fluorescent in-situ Hybridization. Nitrogen could be effectively removed from domestic wastewater with anammox at a temperature above 20 °C, with an effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration of 6.6 ± 2.7 mg/L, while the influent TN and soluble chemical oxygen demand were 62.6 ± 3.1 mg/L and 88.0 ± 8.1 mg/L, respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Activated sludge size distribution, copy numbers of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria (AMX) per gram of the dry granular sludge (>200 μm) and activated sludge flocs (<200 μm).
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f3: Activated sludge size distribution, copy numbers of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria (AMX) per gram of the dry granular sludge (>200 μm) and activated sludge flocs (<200 μm).

Mentions: The AOB and anammox bacteria distribution in the two forms of sludge was further investigated on day 70, when TN removal efficiency was at a relatively stable level, with an average efficiency of 85%. The particle size distribution curve shows two clear peaks at 70 μm and 530 μm, respectively (Fig. 3A). These peaks likely corresponded to the mean particle sizes of flocs and granules. Based on this result, the particles were separated using a wet-sieving method with a seive of 200 μm (delineating the valley between two peaks in Fig. 3A). Particles larger than 200 μm were broadly regarded as granules, with a mean size of 522 um; particles smaller than 200 μm were characterized as flocs, with a mean size of 67 μm (Figure S1). The settling velocity of these granules (>200 μm) fell in the range of 17–60 m/h, consistent with the settling velocity of anammox granular sludge (Table S1).


Suppressing Nitrite-oxidizing Bacteria Growth to Achieve Nitrogen Removal from Domestic Wastewater via Anammox Using Intermittent Aeration with Low Dissolved Oxygen.

Ma B, Bao P, Wei Y, Zhu G, Yuan Z, Peng Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Activated sludge size distribution, copy numbers of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria (AMX) per gram of the dry granular sludge (>200 μm) and activated sludge flocs (<200 μm).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4564738&req=5

f3: Activated sludge size distribution, copy numbers of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria (AMX) per gram of the dry granular sludge (>200 μm) and activated sludge flocs (<200 μm).
Mentions: The AOB and anammox bacteria distribution in the two forms of sludge was further investigated on day 70, when TN removal efficiency was at a relatively stable level, with an average efficiency of 85%. The particle size distribution curve shows two clear peaks at 70 μm and 530 μm, respectively (Fig. 3A). These peaks likely corresponded to the mean particle sizes of flocs and granules. Based on this result, the particles were separated using a wet-sieving method with a seive of 200 μm (delineating the valley between two peaks in Fig. 3A). Particles larger than 200 μm were broadly regarded as granules, with a mean size of 522 um; particles smaller than 200 μm were characterized as flocs, with a mean size of 67 μm (Figure S1). The settling velocity of these granules (>200 μm) fell in the range of 17–60 m/h, consistent with the settling velocity of anammox granular sludge (Table S1).

Bottom Line: Achieving nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater using anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has the potential to make wastewater treatment energy-neutral or even energy-positive.The results showed that NOB was successfully suppressed using that method, with the relative abundance of NOB maintained between 2.0-2.6%, based on Fluorescent in-situ Hybridization.Nitrogen could be effectively removed from domestic wastewater with anammox at a temperature above 20 °C, with an effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration of 6.6 ± 2.7 mg/L, while the influent TN and soluble chemical oxygen demand were 62.6 ± 3.1 mg/L and 88.0 ± 8.1 mg/L, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Beijing Water Quality Science and Water Environment Recovery Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Achieving nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater using anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has the potential to make wastewater treatment energy-neutral or even energy-positive. The challenge is to suppress the growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). This study presents a promising method based on intermittent aeration with low dissolved oxygen to limit NOB growth, thereby providing an advantage to anammox bacteria to form a partnership with the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The results showed that NOB was successfully suppressed using that method, with the relative abundance of NOB maintained between 2.0-2.6%, based on Fluorescent in-situ Hybridization. Nitrogen could be effectively removed from domestic wastewater with anammox at a temperature above 20 °C, with an effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration of 6.6 ± 2.7 mg/L, while the influent TN and soluble chemical oxygen demand were 62.6 ± 3.1 mg/L and 88.0 ± 8.1 mg/L, respectively.

No MeSH data available.