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Smoking in the home after childbirth: prevalence and determinants in an English cohort.

Orton S, Coleman T, Jones LL, Cooper S, Lewis S - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: In multivariable logistic regression, mothers smoking ≥11 cigarettes per day were 8.2 times (95% CI 3.4 to 19.6) more likely to report smoking in the home.Younger age, being of non-white ethnicity, increased deprivation and less negative attitudes towards SHS were also associated with smoking in the home.Interventions to support smoking mothers to quit, or to help them restrict smoking in the home, should target attitudinal change and address inequality relating to social disadvantage, younger age and non-white ethnic groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UK Centre for Tobacco & Alcohol Studies & Division of Primary Care, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consort diagram of response rates and reasons for withdrawal.
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BMJOPEN2015008856F2: Consort diagram of response rates and reasons for withdrawal.

Mentions: At follow-up, the response rate was 56% (n=476) after non-response and withdrawal (figure 2). Owing to missing data in some of the returned questionnaires, smoking in the home information was available for 471 participants. Table 1 shows the characteristics of women who did and did not respond to the follow-up questionnaire 3 months after childbirth.


Smoking in the home after childbirth: prevalence and determinants in an English cohort.

Orton S, Coleman T, Jones LL, Cooper S, Lewis S - BMJ Open (2015)

Consort diagram of response rates and reasons for withdrawal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563266&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008856F2: Consort diagram of response rates and reasons for withdrawal.
Mentions: At follow-up, the response rate was 56% (n=476) after non-response and withdrawal (figure 2). Owing to missing data in some of the returned questionnaires, smoking in the home information was available for 471 participants. Table 1 shows the characteristics of women who did and did not respond to the follow-up questionnaire 3 months after childbirth.

Bottom Line: In multivariable logistic regression, mothers smoking ≥11 cigarettes per day were 8.2 times (95% CI 3.4 to 19.6) more likely to report smoking in the home.Younger age, being of non-white ethnicity, increased deprivation and less negative attitudes towards SHS were also associated with smoking in the home.Interventions to support smoking mothers to quit, or to help them restrict smoking in the home, should target attitudinal change and address inequality relating to social disadvantage, younger age and non-white ethnic groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UK Centre for Tobacco & Alcohol Studies & Division of Primary Care, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus