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Health risk of air pollution on people living with major chronic diseases: a Canadian population-based study.

To T, Feldman L, Simatovic J, Gershon AS, Dell S, Su J, Foty R, Licskai C - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The greatest increases in outpatient visits were for individuals with non-lung cancers (AQHI:RR=1.05; NO2:RR=1.14; p<0.0001) and COPD (AQHI:RR=1.05; NO2:RR=1.12; p<0.0001) and in hospitalisations, for individuals with diabetes (AQHI:RR=1.04; NO2:RR=1.07; p<0.0001) and COPD (AQHI:RR=1.03; NO2:RR=1.09; p<1.001).The impact remained 2 days after peak AQHI levels.Future research would do well to measure the utility of targeted air quality advisories based on the AQHI to reduce associated health service use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, North York, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk* of health services use by pollutants on day 0 of exposure: AQHI, NO2, PM2.5 and O3. * The Rate Ratios were obtained from Poisson Regressions and these correspond to increase/decrease in risk of the respective health services use per unit increase in AQHI and per 10-unit increase in each of NO2, PM2.5 and O3. All Rate Ratios were adjusted for age groups, sex, day of the week, temperature, seasons, years, Local Health Integration Network and income quintiles. Error bars represent 95% CIs.
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BMJOPEN2015009075F1: Risk* of health services use by pollutants on day 0 of exposure: AQHI, NO2, PM2.5 and O3. * The Rate Ratios were obtained from Poisson Regressions and these correspond to increase/decrease in risk of the respective health services use per unit increase in AQHI and per 10-unit increase in each of NO2, PM2.5 and O3. All Rate Ratios were adjusted for age groups, sex, day of the week, temperature, seasons, years, Local Health Integration Network and income quintiles. Error bars represent 95% CIs.

Mentions: Table 2 and figure 1 show the results of the disease-specific multivariable Poisson regressions that modelled the association between AQHI, air pollutants and health service use on day 0 of exposure (see day 1 and 2 of exposure in online supplementary material, table S4a and S4b). The risk of individual pollutant was adjusted for the presence of other pollutants. None of the regression models violated model assumptions. Overall, the increase in the rate of outpatient visits for each unit increase in the same-day AQHI and each unit (10-ppb) increase in daily maximum NO2 (adjusted for PM2.5 and O3) varied from 1% to 14%. Those with non-lung cancers (AQHI:RR=1.05; NO2:RR=1.14) or COPD (AQHI:RR=1.05; NO2:RR=1.12) had the greatest increase in same-day outpatient visits. Increase in rate of same-day hospitalisation was highest among those with diabetes (AQHI RR=1.04; NO2:RR=1.07) and COPD (AQHI RR=1.03; NO2:RR=1.09). The increase in rate of same-day emergency department visits was relatively small. The impact on health service use remained 1 and 2 days after the measured peak AQHI and NO2.


Health risk of air pollution on people living with major chronic diseases: a Canadian population-based study.

To T, Feldman L, Simatovic J, Gershon AS, Dell S, Su J, Foty R, Licskai C - BMJ Open (2015)

Risk* of health services use by pollutants on day 0 of exposure: AQHI, NO2, PM2.5 and O3. * The Rate Ratios were obtained from Poisson Regressions and these correspond to increase/decrease in risk of the respective health services use per unit increase in AQHI and per 10-unit increase in each of NO2, PM2.5 and O3. All Rate Ratios were adjusted for age groups, sex, day of the week, temperature, seasons, years, Local Health Integration Network and income quintiles. Error bars represent 95% CIs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563262&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009075F1: Risk* of health services use by pollutants on day 0 of exposure: AQHI, NO2, PM2.5 and O3. * The Rate Ratios were obtained from Poisson Regressions and these correspond to increase/decrease in risk of the respective health services use per unit increase in AQHI and per 10-unit increase in each of NO2, PM2.5 and O3. All Rate Ratios were adjusted for age groups, sex, day of the week, temperature, seasons, years, Local Health Integration Network and income quintiles. Error bars represent 95% CIs.
Mentions: Table 2 and figure 1 show the results of the disease-specific multivariable Poisson regressions that modelled the association between AQHI, air pollutants and health service use on day 0 of exposure (see day 1 and 2 of exposure in online supplementary material, table S4a and S4b). The risk of individual pollutant was adjusted for the presence of other pollutants. None of the regression models violated model assumptions. Overall, the increase in the rate of outpatient visits for each unit increase in the same-day AQHI and each unit (10-ppb) increase in daily maximum NO2 (adjusted for PM2.5 and O3) varied from 1% to 14%. Those with non-lung cancers (AQHI:RR=1.05; NO2:RR=1.14) or COPD (AQHI:RR=1.05; NO2:RR=1.12) had the greatest increase in same-day outpatient visits. Increase in rate of same-day hospitalisation was highest among those with diabetes (AQHI RR=1.04; NO2:RR=1.07) and COPD (AQHI RR=1.03; NO2:RR=1.09). The increase in rate of same-day emergency department visits was relatively small. The impact on health service use remained 1 and 2 days after the measured peak AQHI and NO2.

Bottom Line: The greatest increases in outpatient visits were for individuals with non-lung cancers (AQHI:RR=1.05; NO2:RR=1.14; p<0.0001) and COPD (AQHI:RR=1.05; NO2:RR=1.12; p<0.0001) and in hospitalisations, for individuals with diabetes (AQHI:RR=1.04; NO2:RR=1.07; p<0.0001) and COPD (AQHI:RR=1.03; NO2:RR=1.09; p<1.001).The impact remained 2 days after peak AQHI levels.Future research would do well to measure the utility of targeted air quality advisories based on the AQHI to reduce associated health service use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, North York, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus