Limits...
Nonlinear electrical impedance spectroscopy of viruses using very high electric fields created by nanogap electrodes.

Hatsuki R, Honda A, Kajitani M, Yamamoto T - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Our living sphere is constantly exposed to a wide range of pathogenic viruses, which can be either known, or of novel origin.These preliminary results show that the three virus types can be distinguished and their approximate concentrations determined.Although further studies are required, the proposed nonlinear impedance spectroscopy method may achieve a sensitivity comparable to that of more traditional, but less versatile, virus detection systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Our living sphere is constantly exposed to a wide range of pathogenic viruses, which can be either known, or of novel origin. Currently, there is no methodology for continuously monitoring the environment for viruses in general, much less a methodology that allows the rapid and sensitive identification of a wide variety of viruses responsible for communicable diseases. Traditional approaches, based on PCR and immunodetection systems, only detect known or specifically targeted viruses. We here describe a simple device that can potentially detect any virus between nanogap electrodes using nonlinear impedance spectroscopy. Three test viruses, differing in shape and size, were used to demonstrate the general applicability of this approach: baculovirus, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and influenza virus. We show that each of the virus types responded differently in the nanogap to changes in the electric field strength, and the impedance of the virus solutions differed depending both on virus type and virus concentration. These preliminary results show that the three virus types can be distinguished and their approximate concentrations determined. Although further studies are required, the proposed nonlinear impedance spectroscopy method may achieve a sensitivity comparable to that of more traditional, but less versatile, virus detection systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Magnitude of impedance for baculovirus, TMV, and influenza virus solution at 1 MHz. The concentration was varied from 1011 to 1014 virions/mL.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563260&req=5

Figure 5: Magnitude of impedance for baculovirus, TMV, and influenza virus solution at 1 MHz. The concentration was varied from 1011 to 1014 virions/mL.

Mentions: As shown in Figure 4, all three viruses showed an impedance peak and transition point near 1 MHz for both the real component and imaginary components. In Figure 5, the vertical and horizontal axes represent the magnitude of the impedance and the virus concentration, respectively. The figure shows the dependence of the impedance magnitude at 1 MHz on the virus concentration for each virus. These results clearly indicate that the impedance values for the three virus types tend to increase with increasing concentration and can therefore be used to quantify the virus concentration.


Nonlinear electrical impedance spectroscopy of viruses using very high electric fields created by nanogap electrodes.

Hatsuki R, Honda A, Kajitani M, Yamamoto T - Front Microbiol (2015)

Magnitude of impedance for baculovirus, TMV, and influenza virus solution at 1 MHz. The concentration was varied from 1011 to 1014 virions/mL.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563260&req=5

Figure 5: Magnitude of impedance for baculovirus, TMV, and influenza virus solution at 1 MHz. The concentration was varied from 1011 to 1014 virions/mL.
Mentions: As shown in Figure 4, all three viruses showed an impedance peak and transition point near 1 MHz for both the real component and imaginary components. In Figure 5, the vertical and horizontal axes represent the magnitude of the impedance and the virus concentration, respectively. The figure shows the dependence of the impedance magnitude at 1 MHz on the virus concentration for each virus. These results clearly indicate that the impedance values for the three virus types tend to increase with increasing concentration and can therefore be used to quantify the virus concentration.

Bottom Line: Our living sphere is constantly exposed to a wide range of pathogenic viruses, which can be either known, or of novel origin.These preliminary results show that the three virus types can be distinguished and their approximate concentrations determined.Although further studies are required, the proposed nonlinear impedance spectroscopy method may achieve a sensitivity comparable to that of more traditional, but less versatile, virus detection systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Our living sphere is constantly exposed to a wide range of pathogenic viruses, which can be either known, or of novel origin. Currently, there is no methodology for continuously monitoring the environment for viruses in general, much less a methodology that allows the rapid and sensitive identification of a wide variety of viruses responsible for communicable diseases. Traditional approaches, based on PCR and immunodetection systems, only detect known or specifically targeted viruses. We here describe a simple device that can potentially detect any virus between nanogap electrodes using nonlinear impedance spectroscopy. Three test viruses, differing in shape and size, were used to demonstrate the general applicability of this approach: baculovirus, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and influenza virus. We show that each of the virus types responded differently in the nanogap to changes in the electric field strength, and the impedance of the virus solutions differed depending both on virus type and virus concentration. These preliminary results show that the three virus types can be distinguished and their approximate concentrations determined. Although further studies are required, the proposed nonlinear impedance spectroscopy method may achieve a sensitivity comparable to that of more traditional, but less versatile, virus detection systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus