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Are mass-media campaigns effective in preventing drug use? A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

Allara E, Ferri M, Bo A, Gasparrini A, Faggiano F - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: To determine whether there is evidence that mass-media campaigns can be effective in reducing illicit drug consumption and the intent to consume.Such factors can contribute to explaining the observed variability in results.Owing to the risk of adverse effects, caution is needed in disseminating mass-media campaigns tackling drug use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Translational Medicine, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy School of Public Health, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pooling of the meth project interrupted time-series studies: predicted and observed probabilities. Adapted from a previous publication.4
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BMJOPEN2014007449F3: Pooling of the meth project interrupted time-series studies: predicted and observed probabilities. Adapted from a previous publication.4

Mentions: The pooled findings of the five Meth Project studies (n=26 273) suggested no evidence of a change in past-month use of methamphetamine among subjects aged 12–17 (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.83 to 1.61), nor among those aged 18–24 (OR 1.63; 95% CI 0.70 to 3.79) (figure 3A and table 3). There was, however, evidence (p=0.001) of a reduction in past-year use of methamphetamine among those aged 12–17 (OR 0.59; 95% CI 0.43 to 0.81), while there was no evidence of a similar effect among those aged 18–24 (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.34 to 1.45; figure 3B and table 3).


Are mass-media campaigns effective in preventing drug use? A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

Allara E, Ferri M, Bo A, Gasparrini A, Faggiano F - BMJ Open (2015)

Pooling of the meth project interrupted time-series studies: predicted and observed probabilities. Adapted from a previous publication.4
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563251&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007449F3: Pooling of the meth project interrupted time-series studies: predicted and observed probabilities. Adapted from a previous publication.4
Mentions: The pooled findings of the five Meth Project studies (n=26 273) suggested no evidence of a change in past-month use of methamphetamine among subjects aged 12–17 (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.83 to 1.61), nor among those aged 18–24 (OR 1.63; 95% CI 0.70 to 3.79) (figure 3A and table 3). There was, however, evidence (p=0.001) of a reduction in past-year use of methamphetamine among those aged 12–17 (OR 0.59; 95% CI 0.43 to 0.81), while there was no evidence of a similar effect among those aged 18–24 (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.34 to 1.45; figure 3B and table 3).

Bottom Line: To determine whether there is evidence that mass-media campaigns can be effective in reducing illicit drug consumption and the intent to consume.Such factors can contribute to explaining the observed variability in results.Owing to the risk of adverse effects, caution is needed in disseminating mass-media campaigns tackling drug use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Translational Medicine, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy School of Public Health, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus