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Service availability and association between Mutuelles and medical care usage for under-five children in rural Rwanda: a statistical analysis with repeated cross-sectional data.

Mejía-Guevara I, Hill K, Subramanian SV, Lu C - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Using the nationally representative population-based Rwanda Demographic and Health Surveys 2005 and 2010, we conducted a statistical analysis using multilevel logistic random-effects models.The findings were robust to model specifications and estimation methods.This study suggests the importance of strengthening service provision at the supply side in promoting equitable utilisation of childcare with prepayment schemes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Predicted probability of obtaining care when having diarrhoea, fever or cough using multilevel random-effects logistic models.
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BMJOPEN2015008814F1: Predicted probability of obtaining care when having diarrhoea, fever or cough using multilevel random-effects logistic models.

Mentions: We generated predicted probabilities of using care for children from different survey years and/or poverty status, controlling for other covariates and multilevel random effects (figure 1). Compared to children in 2005, the probability of receiving care for both insured and uninsured children in 2010 was significantly higher: 42% (2010) versus 28% (2005) for Mutuelles enrollees, and 24% (2010) versus 17% (2005) for uninsured children (figure 1). This result stayed unchanged when considering children’s poverty status: for children in different poverty groups, both Mutuelles enrollees and uninsured children in 2010 had a higher probability of using care than children in 2005. For example, for children living below the poverty line in 2005, the probability of using medical care was 25.8% (95% CI 25.6% to 26.1%) for Mutuelles enrollees and 15.9% (95% CI 15.7% to 16.1%) for the uninsured. For children who lived below the poverty line in 2010, the probability of using medical care was 39.1% (95% CI 38.8% to 39.4%) for Mutuelles enrollees and 22.0% (95% CI 21.7% to 22.3%) for the uninsured (figure 1). For each group of children, Mutuelles enrollees had a significantly higher probability of using medical care than uninsured children when they were ill.


Service availability and association between Mutuelles and medical care usage for under-five children in rural Rwanda: a statistical analysis with repeated cross-sectional data.

Mejía-Guevara I, Hill K, Subramanian SV, Lu C - BMJ Open (2015)

Predicted probability of obtaining care when having diarrhoea, fever or cough using multilevel random-effects logistic models.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563247&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008814F1: Predicted probability of obtaining care when having diarrhoea, fever or cough using multilevel random-effects logistic models.
Mentions: We generated predicted probabilities of using care for children from different survey years and/or poverty status, controlling for other covariates and multilevel random effects (figure 1). Compared to children in 2005, the probability of receiving care for both insured and uninsured children in 2010 was significantly higher: 42% (2010) versus 28% (2005) for Mutuelles enrollees, and 24% (2010) versus 17% (2005) for uninsured children (figure 1). This result stayed unchanged when considering children’s poverty status: for children in different poverty groups, both Mutuelles enrollees and uninsured children in 2010 had a higher probability of using care than children in 2005. For example, for children living below the poverty line in 2005, the probability of using medical care was 25.8% (95% CI 25.6% to 26.1%) for Mutuelles enrollees and 15.9% (95% CI 15.7% to 16.1%) for the uninsured. For children who lived below the poverty line in 2010, the probability of using medical care was 39.1% (95% CI 38.8% to 39.4%) for Mutuelles enrollees and 22.0% (95% CI 21.7% to 22.3%) for the uninsured (figure 1). For each group of children, Mutuelles enrollees had a significantly higher probability of using medical care than uninsured children when they were ill.

Bottom Line: Using the nationally representative population-based Rwanda Demographic and Health Surveys 2005 and 2010, we conducted a statistical analysis using multilevel logistic random-effects models.The findings were robust to model specifications and estimation methods.This study suggests the importance of strengthening service provision at the supply side in promoting equitable utilisation of childcare with prepayment schemes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus