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What is the influence of randomisation sequence generation and allocation concealment on treatment effects of physical therapy trials? A meta-epidemiological study.

Armijo-Olivo S, Saltaji H, da Costa BR, Fuentes J, Ha C, Cummings GG - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Data extraction including assessments of random sequence generation and allocation concealment was conducted independently by two reviewers.When pooling our results with those of Nuesch et al, we obtained a pooled statistically significant value (ES=0.14; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.26).Our results suggest that when evaluating risk of bias of primary RCTs in PT area, systematic reviewers and clinicians implementing research into practice should pay attention to these biases since they could exaggerate treatment effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CLEAR Outcomes (Connecting Leadership, Education and Research) Research Program, University of Alberta, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy (ECHA), Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rehabilitation Research Center, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Forest plot of the differences in effect sizes between trials with and without adequate sequence generation.
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BMJOPEN2015008562F2: Forest plot of the differences in effect sizes between trials with and without adequate sequence generation.

Mentions: For the purpose of analysing the effect of sequence generation on treatment effects, 22 meta-analyses including 257 trials and analysing 30 287 patients contributed to this analysis. Figure 2 shows the forest plot of the differences in ES between trials with adequate and inadequate random sequence generation. There was no statistically significant difference between the ES of trials with adequate or inadequate random sequence generation (ES=0.02; 95% CI −0.12 to 0.15). The results of the stratified analyses are displayed in figure 3. None of the meta-analyses characteristics had a statistically significant interaction.


What is the influence of randomisation sequence generation and allocation concealment on treatment effects of physical therapy trials? A meta-epidemiological study.

Armijo-Olivo S, Saltaji H, da Costa BR, Fuentes J, Ha C, Cummings GG - BMJ Open (2015)

Forest plot of the differences in effect sizes between trials with and without adequate sequence generation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563231&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008562F2: Forest plot of the differences in effect sizes between trials with and without adequate sequence generation.
Mentions: For the purpose of analysing the effect of sequence generation on treatment effects, 22 meta-analyses including 257 trials and analysing 30 287 patients contributed to this analysis. Figure 2 shows the forest plot of the differences in ES between trials with adequate and inadequate random sequence generation. There was no statistically significant difference between the ES of trials with adequate or inadequate random sequence generation (ES=0.02; 95% CI −0.12 to 0.15). The results of the stratified analyses are displayed in figure 3. None of the meta-analyses characteristics had a statistically significant interaction.

Bottom Line: Data extraction including assessments of random sequence generation and allocation concealment was conducted independently by two reviewers.When pooling our results with those of Nuesch et al, we obtained a pooled statistically significant value (ES=0.14; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.26).Our results suggest that when evaluating risk of bias of primary RCTs in PT area, systematic reviewers and clinicians implementing research into practice should pay attention to these biases since they could exaggerate treatment effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CLEAR Outcomes (Connecting Leadership, Education and Research) Research Program, University of Alberta, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy (ECHA), Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rehabilitation Research Center, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

No MeSH data available.