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The influence of snoring, mouth breathing and apnoea on facial morphology in late childhood: a three-dimensional study.

Al Ali A, Richmond S, Popat H, Playle R, Pickles T, Zhurov AI, Marshall D, Rosin PL, Henderson J, Bonuck K - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: We excluded from the original cohort all children identified as having congenital abnormalities, diagnoses associated with poor growth and children with adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy.Differences in facial measurements were found between the children with and without SDB throughout early childhood.The odds of children exhibiting symptoms of SDB increased significantly with respect to increased face height and mandible angle, but reduced with increased nose width and prominence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Applied Clinical Research & Public Health, Dental School, Wales, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean±95% CI of nose width (alL-alR) and 5 levels of sleep disordered breathing severity.
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BMJOPEN2015009027F3: Mean±95% CI of nose width (alL-alR) and 5 levels of sleep disordered breathing severity.

Mentions: Systematic relationships between lower face height, nose width and mandible angle (mean±95% CI), with respect to the five levels of SDB severity, are illustrated in figures 2–4. Lower face height and mandible angle were consistently higher, and nose width was consistently lower, for those who experienced severe and sustained symptoms of SDB throughout childhood. ANOVA results for the lower face height, mandible angle and nose width are p=0.006, 0.000 and 0.004, respectively, with regard to the five levels of SDB groups.


The influence of snoring, mouth breathing and apnoea on facial morphology in late childhood: a three-dimensional study.

Al Ali A, Richmond S, Popat H, Playle R, Pickles T, Zhurov AI, Marshall D, Rosin PL, Henderson J, Bonuck K - BMJ Open (2015)

Mean±95% CI of nose width (alL-alR) and 5 levels of sleep disordered breathing severity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563226&req=5

BMJOPEN2015009027F3: Mean±95% CI of nose width (alL-alR) and 5 levels of sleep disordered breathing severity.
Mentions: Systematic relationships between lower face height, nose width and mandible angle (mean±95% CI), with respect to the five levels of SDB severity, are illustrated in figures 2–4. Lower face height and mandible angle were consistently higher, and nose width was consistently lower, for those who experienced severe and sustained symptoms of SDB throughout childhood. ANOVA results for the lower face height, mandible angle and nose width are p=0.006, 0.000 and 0.004, respectively, with regard to the five levels of SDB groups.

Bottom Line: We excluded from the original cohort all children identified as having congenital abnormalities, diagnoses associated with poor growth and children with adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy.Differences in facial measurements were found between the children with and without SDB throughout early childhood.The odds of children exhibiting symptoms of SDB increased significantly with respect to increased face height and mandible angle, but reduced with increased nose width and prominence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Applied Clinical Research & Public Health, Dental School, Wales, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus