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Impact of physical frailty on disability in community-dwelling older adults: a prospective cohort study.

Makizako H, Shimada H, Doi T, Tsutsumimoto K, Suzuki T - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Prospective cohort study.Participants classified as frail (HR 4.65, 95% CI 2.63 to 8.22) or prefrail (2.52, 1.56 to 4.07) at the baseline assessment had an increased risk of disability incidence compared with robust participants.Physical frailty, even being prefrail, had a strong impact on the risk of future disability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan–Meier estimates of cumulative incidence of disability according to frailty status. Frailty phenotype containing three or more of the following was defined as frail, one or two as prefrail, and none as robust: slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity and weight loss.
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BMJOPEN2015008462F3: Kaplan–Meier estimates of cumulative incidence of disability according to frailty status. Frailty phenotype containing three or more of the following was defined as frail, one or two as prefrail, and none as robust: slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity and weight loss.

Mentions: Figures 3 and 4 show the cumulative risk of disability based on frailty status and components. Survival analyses with the Kaplan-Meier log-rank test showed that the probability of incidence of disability was significantly higher in participants categorised as frail compared with those categorised as prefrail or robust (p<0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the incidence of disability between prefrail and robust individuals (p<0.001). Survival analysis performed for frailty components showed significant differences in the incidence of disability, according to the presence of frailty subitems at baseline (p<0.001) (figure 4).


Impact of physical frailty on disability in community-dwelling older adults: a prospective cohort study.

Makizako H, Shimada H, Doi T, Tsutsumimoto K, Suzuki T - BMJ Open (2015)

Kaplan–Meier estimates of cumulative incidence of disability according to frailty status. Frailty phenotype containing three or more of the following was defined as frail, one or two as prefrail, and none as robust: slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity and weight loss.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563225&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008462F3: Kaplan–Meier estimates of cumulative incidence of disability according to frailty status. Frailty phenotype containing three or more of the following was defined as frail, one or two as prefrail, and none as robust: slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity and weight loss.
Mentions: Figures 3 and 4 show the cumulative risk of disability based on frailty status and components. Survival analyses with the Kaplan-Meier log-rank test showed that the probability of incidence of disability was significantly higher in participants categorised as frail compared with those categorised as prefrail or robust (p<0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the incidence of disability between prefrail and robust individuals (p<0.001). Survival analysis performed for frailty components showed significant differences in the incidence of disability, according to the presence of frailty subitems at baseline (p<0.001) (figure 4).

Bottom Line: Prospective cohort study.Participants classified as frail (HR 4.65, 95% CI 2.63 to 8.22) or prefrail (2.52, 1.56 to 4.07) at the baseline assessment had an increased risk of disability incidence compared with robust participants.Physical frailty, even being prefrail, had a strong impact on the risk of future disability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus