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Disabling chronic conditions in childhood and socioeconomic disadvantage: a systematic review and meta-analyses of observational studies.

Spencer NJ, Blackburn CM, Read JM - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Narrative analysis was undertaken for studies without data suitable for meta-analysis. 126 studies had data suitable for meta-analysis.Heterogeneity was high across most estimates (I(2)>75%).Of the 34 studies without data suitable for meta-analysis, 26 reported results consistent with increased risk associated with low socioeconomic status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk estimates of low socioeconomic status in children with psychological disorders.
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BMJOPEN2014007062F8: Risk estimates of low socioeconomic status in children with psychological disorders.

Mentions: One hundred and twenty-six studies had data suitable for meta-analysis. Risk and pooled random-effects estimates for groups of disabling chronic conditions are shown in figures 2–9 and table 3. The pooled ORs for the different groups of disabling chronic conditions by low SES were as follows: 1.72 for 20 studies reporting all-cause disabling chronic conditions, 1.88 for 55 studies reporting psychological disorders, 2.41 for 21 studies reporting intellectual disability, 2.20 for 13 studies reporting activity limitation or hospital admission for asthma, 1.42 for 6 studies reporting cerebral palsy, 1.41 for 13 studies of congenital abnormalities, 1.38 for 6 studies of epilepsy and 1.70 for 9 studies of sensory impairments. The I2 statistic was >75% for all, but the pooled estimates for cerebral palsy, epilepsy and sensory impairments. Pooled estimates were available for specific psychological disorders (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; 1.63 (1.42 to 1.86)), conduct disorder (1.93 (1.58 to 2.38)) and emotional disorder (2.03 (1.67 to 2.47)), and for mild (3.94 (2.26 to 6.86)) and moderate/severe (2.19 (1.84 to 2.64)) intellectual disability (forest plots not shown)).


Disabling chronic conditions in childhood and socioeconomic disadvantage: a systematic review and meta-analyses of observational studies.

Spencer NJ, Blackburn CM, Read JM - BMJ Open (2015)

Risk estimates of low socioeconomic status in children with psychological disorders.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563224&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007062F8: Risk estimates of low socioeconomic status in children with psychological disorders.
Mentions: One hundred and twenty-six studies had data suitable for meta-analysis. Risk and pooled random-effects estimates for groups of disabling chronic conditions are shown in figures 2–9 and table 3. The pooled ORs for the different groups of disabling chronic conditions by low SES were as follows: 1.72 for 20 studies reporting all-cause disabling chronic conditions, 1.88 for 55 studies reporting psychological disorders, 2.41 for 21 studies reporting intellectual disability, 2.20 for 13 studies reporting activity limitation or hospital admission for asthma, 1.42 for 6 studies reporting cerebral palsy, 1.41 for 13 studies of congenital abnormalities, 1.38 for 6 studies of epilepsy and 1.70 for 9 studies of sensory impairments. The I2 statistic was >75% for all, but the pooled estimates for cerebral palsy, epilepsy and sensory impairments. Pooled estimates were available for specific psychological disorders (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; 1.63 (1.42 to 1.86)), conduct disorder (1.93 (1.58 to 2.38)) and emotional disorder (2.03 (1.67 to 2.47)), and for mild (3.94 (2.26 to 6.86)) and moderate/severe (2.19 (1.84 to 2.64)) intellectual disability (forest plots not shown)).

Bottom Line: Narrative analysis was undertaken for studies without data suitable for meta-analysis. 126 studies had data suitable for meta-analysis.Heterogeneity was high across most estimates (I(2)>75%).Of the 34 studies without data suitable for meta-analysis, 26 reported results consistent with increased risk associated with low socioeconomic status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus