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Nuclear Medicine in Thyroid Diseases in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients.

Volkan-Salancı B, Kıratlı PÖ - Mol Imaging Radionucl Ther (2015)

Bottom Line: Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge.This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Phone: +90 312 305 13 36 E-mail: pkiratli@hacettepe.edu.tr.

ABSTRACT
Both benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid are rare in the pediatric and adolescent population, except congenital hypothyroidism. Nuclear medicine plays a major role, both in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid pathologies. Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge. This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 16-year -old female admitted to nuclear medicine department with a diagnosis of 1.7 cm papillary thyroid cancer and multiple right cervical lymph node metastases. She received 150 mCi RAI therapy. On follow-up, the thyroglobulin level (54.4 ng/mL) was elevaletd with a TSH=87μIU/mL. The I-131 wholebody (A) and SPECT/CT imagings were normal (B). F-18 FDG PET/CT showed FDG uptake (SUVmax: 3) left supraclavicular lymph node (C)
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f5: A 16-year -old female admitted to nuclear medicine department with a diagnosis of 1.7 cm papillary thyroid cancer and multiple right cervical lymph node metastases. She received 150 mCi RAI therapy. On follow-up, the thyroglobulin level (54.4 ng/mL) was elevaletd with a TSH=87μIU/mL. The I-131 wholebody (A) and SPECT/CT imagings were normal (B). F-18 FDG PET/CT showed FDG uptake (SUVmax: 3) left supraclavicular lymph node (C)

Mentions: FDG-PET has no value in the follow-up of patients with DTC. However, elevated thyroglobulin levels and negative I-131 wholebody scintigraphy is a clue for de-differentiation of thyroid carcinoma, and F-18 FDG PET is indicated in such cases (Figure 5). Increased FDG uptake focus in thyroid carcinoma is a predictor of poor outcome, in which case alternative therapies to RAI should be planned for the patient (92).


Nuclear Medicine in Thyroid Diseases in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients.

Volkan-Salancı B, Kıratlı PÖ - Mol Imaging Radionucl Ther (2015)

A 16-year -old female admitted to nuclear medicine department with a diagnosis of 1.7 cm papillary thyroid cancer and multiple right cervical lymph node metastases. She received 150 mCi RAI therapy. On follow-up, the thyroglobulin level (54.4 ng/mL) was elevaletd with a TSH=87μIU/mL. The I-131 wholebody (A) and SPECT/CT imagings were normal (B). F-18 FDG PET/CT showed FDG uptake (SUVmax: 3) left supraclavicular lymph node (C)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563170&req=5

f5: A 16-year -old female admitted to nuclear medicine department with a diagnosis of 1.7 cm papillary thyroid cancer and multiple right cervical lymph node metastases. She received 150 mCi RAI therapy. On follow-up, the thyroglobulin level (54.4 ng/mL) was elevaletd with a TSH=87μIU/mL. The I-131 wholebody (A) and SPECT/CT imagings were normal (B). F-18 FDG PET/CT showed FDG uptake (SUVmax: 3) left supraclavicular lymph node (C)
Mentions: FDG-PET has no value in the follow-up of patients with DTC. However, elevated thyroglobulin levels and negative I-131 wholebody scintigraphy is a clue for de-differentiation of thyroid carcinoma, and F-18 FDG PET is indicated in such cases (Figure 5). Increased FDG uptake focus in thyroid carcinoma is a predictor of poor outcome, in which case alternative therapies to RAI should be planned for the patient (92).

Bottom Line: Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge.This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Phone: +90 312 305 13 36 E-mail: pkiratli@hacettepe.edu.tr.

ABSTRACT
Both benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid are rare in the pediatric and adolescent population, except congenital hypothyroidism. Nuclear medicine plays a major role, both in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid pathologies. Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge. This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus