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Understanding salinity responses and adopting 'omics-based' approaches to generate salinity tolerant cultivars of rice.

Das P, Nutan KK, Singla-Pareek SL, Pareek A - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Soil salinity is one of the main constraints affecting production of rice worldwide, by reducing growth, pollen viability as well as yield of the plant.Therefore, detailed understanding of the response of rice towards soil salinity at the physiological and molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management.In addition, we have highlighted the importance of integration of various 'omics' approaches to develop an understanding of the machinery involved in salinity response in rice and to move forward to develop salt tolerant cultivars of rice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stress Physiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Soil salinity is one of the main constraints affecting production of rice worldwide, by reducing growth, pollen viability as well as yield of the plant. Therefore, detailed understanding of the response of rice towards soil salinity at the physiological and molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. Various approaches have been adopted by molecular biologists or breeders to understand the mechanism for salinity tolerance in plants and to develop salt tolerant rice cultivars. Genome wide analysis using 'omics-based' tools followed by identification and functional validation of individual genes is becoming one of the popular approaches to tackle this task. On the other hand, mutation breeding and insertional mutagenesis has also been exploited to obtain salinity tolerant crop plants. This review looks into various responses at cellular and whole plant level generated in rice plants toward salinity stress thus, evaluating the suitability of intervention of functional genomics to raise stress tolerant plants. We have tried to highlight the usefulness of the contemporary 'omics-based' approaches such as genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and phenomics towards dissecting out the salinity tolerance trait in rice. In addition, we have highlighted the importance of integration of various 'omics' approaches to develop an understanding of the machinery involved in salinity response in rice and to move forward to develop salt tolerant cultivars of rice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage decline in yield (g Hill-1) of various germplasms of rice (IR-20, Pokkali, MR33, MR52, and BRRI dhan29) in response to salinity. Web digram was constructed taking yield of each genotype under non-stress condition (0 ds m-1) as 100%. Note that Pokkali appears to be most tolerant genotype among the ones studied here, as it could give 10% yield even at 12 ds m-1. (Source; Hakim et al., 2014).
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Figure 1: Percentage decline in yield (g Hill-1) of various germplasms of rice (IR-20, Pokkali, MR33, MR52, and BRRI dhan29) in response to salinity. Web digram was constructed taking yield of each genotype under non-stress condition (0 ds m-1) as 100%. Note that Pokkali appears to be most tolerant genotype among the ones studied here, as it could give 10% yield even at 12 ds m-1. (Source; Hakim et al., 2014).

Mentions: Seedling-stage salt tolerance is independent of flowering/reproductive stage tolerance (Singh et al., 2004), and has been established by the behavior of CN499-160-13-6 genotype which is a confirmed susceptible genotype at the juvenile stage but tolerant at the flowering stage. This analysis by Mohammadi-Nejad et al. (2010) indicate that seedling and flowering stage salt tolerance is determined by altogether different set of genes in rice. Recently, another group of rice researcher has analyzed the dry mass of rice shoot and root along with the grain yield under various levels of salinity (Hakim et al., 2014). In their report, it has been shown that the level of salinity is inversely proportional to the rice grain yield (Figure 1, Table 2). It has also been observed that the dry mass of shoot and root in rice decreases with the increase in the level of salinity. The grain yield reduction in rice by salinity stress might be due to the modification in flexibility of the cell wall, and subsequent reduction in the turgor pressure effectiveness in cell growth (Hakim et al., 2014). However, it is evident that increased salt level in soil disturbs the photosynthesis, causes shrinkage of cell contents, reduces growth and differentiation of tissues, cause imbalance in nutrition, injury of membranes, and ultimately, affects the yield contributing characters (Mahmod et al., 2009; Nejad et al., 2010; Hakim et al., 2014).


Understanding salinity responses and adopting 'omics-based' approaches to generate salinity tolerant cultivars of rice.

Das P, Nutan KK, Singla-Pareek SL, Pareek A - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Percentage decline in yield (g Hill-1) of various germplasms of rice (IR-20, Pokkali, MR33, MR52, and BRRI dhan29) in response to salinity. Web digram was constructed taking yield of each genotype under non-stress condition (0 ds m-1) as 100%. Note that Pokkali appears to be most tolerant genotype among the ones studied here, as it could give 10% yield even at 12 ds m-1. (Source; Hakim et al., 2014).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563168&req=5

Figure 1: Percentage decline in yield (g Hill-1) of various germplasms of rice (IR-20, Pokkali, MR33, MR52, and BRRI dhan29) in response to salinity. Web digram was constructed taking yield of each genotype under non-stress condition (0 ds m-1) as 100%. Note that Pokkali appears to be most tolerant genotype among the ones studied here, as it could give 10% yield even at 12 ds m-1. (Source; Hakim et al., 2014).
Mentions: Seedling-stage salt tolerance is independent of flowering/reproductive stage tolerance (Singh et al., 2004), and has been established by the behavior of CN499-160-13-6 genotype which is a confirmed susceptible genotype at the juvenile stage but tolerant at the flowering stage. This analysis by Mohammadi-Nejad et al. (2010) indicate that seedling and flowering stage salt tolerance is determined by altogether different set of genes in rice. Recently, another group of rice researcher has analyzed the dry mass of rice shoot and root along with the grain yield under various levels of salinity (Hakim et al., 2014). In their report, it has been shown that the level of salinity is inversely proportional to the rice grain yield (Figure 1, Table 2). It has also been observed that the dry mass of shoot and root in rice decreases with the increase in the level of salinity. The grain yield reduction in rice by salinity stress might be due to the modification in flexibility of the cell wall, and subsequent reduction in the turgor pressure effectiveness in cell growth (Hakim et al., 2014). However, it is evident that increased salt level in soil disturbs the photosynthesis, causes shrinkage of cell contents, reduces growth and differentiation of tissues, cause imbalance in nutrition, injury of membranes, and ultimately, affects the yield contributing characters (Mahmod et al., 2009; Nejad et al., 2010; Hakim et al., 2014).

Bottom Line: Soil salinity is one of the main constraints affecting production of rice worldwide, by reducing growth, pollen viability as well as yield of the plant.Therefore, detailed understanding of the response of rice towards soil salinity at the physiological and molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management.In addition, we have highlighted the importance of integration of various 'omics' approaches to develop an understanding of the machinery involved in salinity response in rice and to move forward to develop salt tolerant cultivars of rice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stress Physiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Soil salinity is one of the main constraints affecting production of rice worldwide, by reducing growth, pollen viability as well as yield of the plant. Therefore, detailed understanding of the response of rice towards soil salinity at the physiological and molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. Various approaches have been adopted by molecular biologists or breeders to understand the mechanism for salinity tolerance in plants and to develop salt tolerant rice cultivars. Genome wide analysis using 'omics-based' tools followed by identification and functional validation of individual genes is becoming one of the popular approaches to tackle this task. On the other hand, mutation breeding and insertional mutagenesis has also been exploited to obtain salinity tolerant crop plants. This review looks into various responses at cellular and whole plant level generated in rice plants toward salinity stress thus, evaluating the suitability of intervention of functional genomics to raise stress tolerant plants. We have tried to highlight the usefulness of the contemporary 'omics-based' approaches such as genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and phenomics towards dissecting out the salinity tolerance trait in rice. In addition, we have highlighted the importance of integration of various 'omics' approaches to develop an understanding of the machinery involved in salinity response in rice and to move forward to develop salt tolerant cultivars of rice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus