Limits...
A case study on the genetic origin of the high oleic acid trait through FAD2-1 DNA sequence variation in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

Rapson S, Wu M, Okada S, Das A, Shrestha P, Zhou XR, Wood C, Green A, Singh S, Liu Q - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The ol allele was found to be a defective microsomal oleate desaturase FAD2-1.It is from this gene that FAD2-1Δ was derived more recently.Identification and characterization of the genetic origin and diversity of FAD2-1 could aid safflower breeders in reducing population size and generations required for the development of new high oleic acid varieties by using perfect molecular marker-assisted selection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Agriculture Canberra, ACT, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is considered a strongly domesticated species with a long history of cultivation. The hybridization of safflower with its wild relatives has played an important role in the evolution of cultivars and is of particular interest with regards to their production of high quality edible oils. Original safflower varieties were all rich in linoleic acid, while varieties rich in oleic acid have risen to prominence in recent decades. The high oleic acid trait is controlled by a partially recessive allele ol at a single locus OL. The ol allele was found to be a defective microsomal oleate desaturase FAD2-1. Here we present DNA sequence data and Southern blot analysis suggesting that there has been an ancient hybridization and introgression of the FAD2-1 gene into C. tinctorius from its wild relative C. palaestinus. It is from this gene that FAD2-1Δ was derived more recently. Identification and characterization of the genetic origin and diversity of FAD2-1 could aid safflower breeders in reducing population size and generations required for the development of new high oleic acid varieties by using perfect molecular marker-assisted selection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map showing the locations of samples grouped according to FAD2-1 sequences excluding cultivars. , C. tinctorius group A; , C. tinctorius group B; , C. palaestinus; , C. oxyacantha.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563165&req=5

Figure 3: Map showing the locations of samples grouped according to FAD2-1 sequences excluding cultivars. , C. tinctorius group A; , C. tinctorius group B; , C. palaestinus; , C. oxyacantha.

Mentions: A total of 18 haplotypes of FAD2-2 were identified with 178 variable sites across all species, including 4 haplotypes for C. oxycanthus (n = 5); 1 haplotype for C. palaestinus (n = 1); and 13 haplotypes for C. tinctorius (n = 16). In phylogenetic analyses all the three species were genetically distinct from one another. In contrast to FAD2-1, C. oxyacantha and G. palaestinus FAD2-2 appeared to be more closely related to each other than to C. tinctorius (Figure 2). We have tracked the origin of samples and found that all clades appear to be widespread across the globe, without a distinct distribution pattern (Figure 3).


A case study on the genetic origin of the high oleic acid trait through FAD2-1 DNA sequence variation in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

Rapson S, Wu M, Okada S, Das A, Shrestha P, Zhou XR, Wood C, Green A, Singh S, Liu Q - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Map showing the locations of samples grouped according to FAD2-1 sequences excluding cultivars. , C. tinctorius group A; , C. tinctorius group B; , C. palaestinus; , C. oxyacantha.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563165&req=5

Figure 3: Map showing the locations of samples grouped according to FAD2-1 sequences excluding cultivars. , C. tinctorius group A; , C. tinctorius group B; , C. palaestinus; , C. oxyacantha.
Mentions: A total of 18 haplotypes of FAD2-2 were identified with 178 variable sites across all species, including 4 haplotypes for C. oxycanthus (n = 5); 1 haplotype for C. palaestinus (n = 1); and 13 haplotypes for C. tinctorius (n = 16). In phylogenetic analyses all the three species were genetically distinct from one another. In contrast to FAD2-1, C. oxyacantha and G. palaestinus FAD2-2 appeared to be more closely related to each other than to C. tinctorius (Figure 2). We have tracked the origin of samples and found that all clades appear to be widespread across the globe, without a distinct distribution pattern (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: The ol allele was found to be a defective microsomal oleate desaturase FAD2-1.It is from this gene that FAD2-1Δ was derived more recently.Identification and characterization of the genetic origin and diversity of FAD2-1 could aid safflower breeders in reducing population size and generations required for the development of new high oleic acid varieties by using perfect molecular marker-assisted selection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Agriculture Canberra, ACT, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is considered a strongly domesticated species with a long history of cultivation. The hybridization of safflower with its wild relatives has played an important role in the evolution of cultivars and is of particular interest with regards to their production of high quality edible oils. Original safflower varieties were all rich in linoleic acid, while varieties rich in oleic acid have risen to prominence in recent decades. The high oleic acid trait is controlled by a partially recessive allele ol at a single locus OL. The ol allele was found to be a defective microsomal oleate desaturase FAD2-1. Here we present DNA sequence data and Southern blot analysis suggesting that there has been an ancient hybridization and introgression of the FAD2-1 gene into C. tinctorius from its wild relative C. palaestinus. It is from this gene that FAD2-1Δ was derived more recently. Identification and characterization of the genetic origin and diversity of FAD2-1 could aid safflower breeders in reducing population size and generations required for the development of new high oleic acid varieties by using perfect molecular marker-assisted selection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus