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Morpho-physiolological and qualitative traits of a bread wheat collection spanning a century of breeding in Italy.

Laino P, Limonta M, Gerna D, Vaccino P - Biodivers Data J (2015)

Bottom Line: A reduced subset, representing the process of wheat breeding in Italy during the last hundred years, was hence identified for an in-depth characterization.The lines were cropped in two locations over two growing seasons, and analyzed using 16 morpho-agronomic and qualitative descriptors.Most of the analysed characters showed a broad variation throughout the collection, allowing to follow the plant ideotype changes across the breeding progress in Italy during the 20th century.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l'analisi dell'economia agraria, Unità di ricerca per la Selezione dei Cereali e la Valorizzazione delle varietà vegetali (CREA-SCV), Sant'Angelo Lodigiano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Evaluation and characterization are crucial steps in the exploitation of germplasm collections. The Sant'Angelo Lodigiano unit of the Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l'analisi dell'economia agraria (CREA) maintains a broad collection of Triticum spp, including more than 4000 genotypes of T. aestivum. Such collection represents a wide source of genetic variability for many agronomic and qualitative traits, extremely useful in modern breeding programs. The collection size, however, makes very difficult its management as a whole. A reduced subset, representing the process of wheat breeding in Italy during the last hundred years, was hence identified for an in-depth characterization. The lines were cropped in two locations over two growing seasons, and analyzed using 16 morpho-agronomic and qualitative descriptors. Most of the analysed characters showed a broad variation throughout the collection, allowing to follow the plant ideotype changes across the breeding progress in Italy during the 20th century.

No MeSH data available.


Radar chart of the average heading date (A) and plant height (B) of the lines under study across two locations (SAL and LO) and two growing seasons (2011-12 and 2012-13). The data behind the graphs are reported in Suppl. material 2; only one every four lines is labelled in the graphs. The lines are sorted by year of release. Fold change variation of heading date (C) and plant height (D) is expressed as ratio between the average value of the single line and that of the population. Standard errors (SE) are represented by bars.
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Figure 898741: Radar chart of the average heading date (A) and plant height (B) of the lines under study across two locations (SAL and LO) and two growing seasons (2011-12 and 2012-13). The data behind the graphs are reported in Suppl. material 2; only one every four lines is labelled in the graphs. The lines are sorted by year of release. Fold change variation of heading date (C) and plant height (D) is expressed as ratio between the average value of the single line and that of the population. Standard errors (SE) are represented by bars.

Mentions: Mean, minimum and maximum values and standard deviations for nine continuously variable descriptors are reported in Table 1, while their frequency distributions are shown in Figs 1, 2, 3. The variability of the descriptors showing discontinuous variation is presented in Table 2. The majority of the lines (62.0%) had erect growth habit of young plants (Table 2); the lines with prostrate growth habit were some landraces and old cultivars, with the exception of Isengrain (released in 1997) and Altamira (2009). Heading date was very variable, with a difference of 30 days between the earliest and the latest accessions and a fold change (FC) variation, with respect to the population average, spanning from +49% to -33% (Table 1 and Fig. 1C). A trend towards earliness was observed going from the oldest to the most recent accessions (Fig. 1A) even if both the latest (Balilla, 55 days) and the earliest (Morru Canu, 25 days) date back to the beginning of the 20th century. Plant height showed a very high variation, spanning from 58 to 153.5 cm, with an average of 103.8 cm and FC going from +47% to -44% (Table 1 and Fig. 1D). A strong decline of plant height was observed over time, with the modern cultivars being much shorter than the older ones (Fig. 1B).


Morpho-physiolological and qualitative traits of a bread wheat collection spanning a century of breeding in Italy.

Laino P, Limonta M, Gerna D, Vaccino P - Biodivers Data J (2015)

Radar chart of the average heading date (A) and plant height (B) of the lines under study across two locations (SAL and LO) and two growing seasons (2011-12 and 2012-13). The data behind the graphs are reported in Suppl. material 2; only one every four lines is labelled in the graphs. The lines are sorted by year of release. Fold change variation of heading date (C) and plant height (D) is expressed as ratio between the average value of the single line and that of the population. Standard errors (SE) are represented by bars.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563155&req=5

Figure 898741: Radar chart of the average heading date (A) and plant height (B) of the lines under study across two locations (SAL and LO) and two growing seasons (2011-12 and 2012-13). The data behind the graphs are reported in Suppl. material 2; only one every four lines is labelled in the graphs. The lines are sorted by year of release. Fold change variation of heading date (C) and plant height (D) is expressed as ratio between the average value of the single line and that of the population. Standard errors (SE) are represented by bars.
Mentions: Mean, minimum and maximum values and standard deviations for nine continuously variable descriptors are reported in Table 1, while their frequency distributions are shown in Figs 1, 2, 3. The variability of the descriptors showing discontinuous variation is presented in Table 2. The majority of the lines (62.0%) had erect growth habit of young plants (Table 2); the lines with prostrate growth habit were some landraces and old cultivars, with the exception of Isengrain (released in 1997) and Altamira (2009). Heading date was very variable, with a difference of 30 days between the earliest and the latest accessions and a fold change (FC) variation, with respect to the population average, spanning from +49% to -33% (Table 1 and Fig. 1C). A trend towards earliness was observed going from the oldest to the most recent accessions (Fig. 1A) even if both the latest (Balilla, 55 days) and the earliest (Morru Canu, 25 days) date back to the beginning of the 20th century. Plant height showed a very high variation, spanning from 58 to 153.5 cm, with an average of 103.8 cm and FC going from +47% to -44% (Table 1 and Fig. 1D). A strong decline of plant height was observed over time, with the modern cultivars being much shorter than the older ones (Fig. 1B).

Bottom Line: A reduced subset, representing the process of wheat breeding in Italy during the last hundred years, was hence identified for an in-depth characterization.The lines were cropped in two locations over two growing seasons, and analyzed using 16 morpho-agronomic and qualitative descriptors.Most of the analysed characters showed a broad variation throughout the collection, allowing to follow the plant ideotype changes across the breeding progress in Italy during the 20th century.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l'analisi dell'economia agraria, Unità di ricerca per la Selezione dei Cereali e la Valorizzazione delle varietà vegetali (CREA-SCV), Sant'Angelo Lodigiano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Evaluation and characterization are crucial steps in the exploitation of germplasm collections. The Sant'Angelo Lodigiano unit of the Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l'analisi dell'economia agraria (CREA) maintains a broad collection of Triticum spp, including more than 4000 genotypes of T. aestivum. Such collection represents a wide source of genetic variability for many agronomic and qualitative traits, extremely useful in modern breeding programs. The collection size, however, makes very difficult its management as a whole. A reduced subset, representing the process of wheat breeding in Italy during the last hundred years, was hence identified for an in-depth characterization. The lines were cropped in two locations over two growing seasons, and analyzed using 16 morpho-agronomic and qualitative descriptors. Most of the analysed characters showed a broad variation throughout the collection, allowing to follow the plant ideotype changes across the breeding progress in Italy during the 20th century.

No MeSH data available.