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A Multi-Dimensional and Integrative Approach to Examining the High-Risk and Ultra-High-Risk Stages of Bipolar Disorder.

Lin K, Xu G, Wong NM, Wu H, Li T, Lu W, Chen K, Chen X, Lai B, Zhong L, So KF, Lee TM - EBioMedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: Compared with the HCs, the UHR offspring had significantly lower assortativity, which was suggestive of vulnerability.Finally, processing speed, visual-spatial, and general function were impaired in the UHR offspring but not in the HR offspring.The abnormalities observed in the HR offspring appear to be inherited, whereas those associated with the UHR offspring represent stage-specific changes predisposing them to developing the disorder.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neuropsychology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Department of Affective Disorders, Guangzhou Brain Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China ; Laboratory of Emotion and Cognition, Guangzhou Brain Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China ; Laboratory of Cognitive Affective Neuroscience, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT

Background: Validating the high-risk (HR) and ultra-high-risk (UHR) stages of bipolar disorder (BP) may help enable early intervention strategies.

Methods: We followed up with 44 offspring of parents with BP, subdividing into the HR and UHR categories. The offspring were aged 8-28 years and were free of any current DSM-IV diagnoses. Our multilevel, integrative approach encompassed gray matter (GM) volumes, brain network connectivity, neuropsychological performance, and clinical outcomes.

Findings: Compared with the healthy controls (HCs) (n = 33), the HR offspring (n = 26) showed GM volume reductions in the right orbitofrontal cortex. Compared with the HR offspring, the UHR offspring (n = 18) exhibited increased GM volumes in four regions. Both the HR and UHR offspring displayed abnormalities in the inferior occipital cortex regarding the measures of degree and centrality, reflecting the connections and roles of the region, respectively. In the UHR versus the HR offspring, the UHR offspring exhibited upwards-shifted small world topologies that reflect high clustering and efficiency in the brain networks. Compared with the HCs, the UHR offspring had significantly lower assortativity, which was suggestive of vulnerability. Finally, processing speed, visual-spatial, and general function were impaired in the UHR offspring but not in the HR offspring.

Interpretation: The abnormalities observed in the HR offspring appear to be inherited, whereas those associated with the UHR offspring represent stage-specific changes predisposing them to developing the disorder.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Turquoise and pink represent the regions showing significant changes in gray matter volumes in the high-risk offspring versus healthy controls and in the high-risk versus ultra-high-risk offspring, respectively. (b) The regions in which the high-risk offspring had significantly lower gray matter volumes than the healthy controls. (c) and (d) The regions in which the ultra-high-risk offspring displayed significantly higher gray matter volumes than the high-risk offspring.
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f0005: (a) Turquoise and pink represent the regions showing significant changes in gray matter volumes in the high-risk offspring versus healthy controls and in the high-risk versus ultra-high-risk offspring, respectively. (b) The regions in which the high-risk offspring had significantly lower gray matter volumes than the healthy controls. (c) and (d) The regions in which the ultra-high-risk offspring displayed significantly higher gray matter volumes than the high-risk offspring.

Mentions: Compared with the healthy controls, the HR offspring showed significantly lower GM volumes in the right OFC and the right cerebellum. Compared to the HR offspring, the UHR offspring had significantly greater GM volumes in four regions, including the right superior frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, left parietal cortex, and the right middle and inferior occipital gyrus (Table 2 and Fig. 1, FWE-corrected p < 0.05).


A Multi-Dimensional and Integrative Approach to Examining the High-Risk and Ultra-High-Risk Stages of Bipolar Disorder.

Lin K, Xu G, Wong NM, Wu H, Li T, Lu W, Chen K, Chen X, Lai B, Zhong L, So KF, Lee TM - EBioMedicine (2015)

(a) Turquoise and pink represent the regions showing significant changes in gray matter volumes in the high-risk offspring versus healthy controls and in the high-risk versus ultra-high-risk offspring, respectively. (b) The regions in which the high-risk offspring had significantly lower gray matter volumes than the healthy controls. (c) and (d) The regions in which the ultra-high-risk offspring displayed significantly higher gray matter volumes than the high-risk offspring.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563124&req=5

f0005: (a) Turquoise and pink represent the regions showing significant changes in gray matter volumes in the high-risk offspring versus healthy controls and in the high-risk versus ultra-high-risk offspring, respectively. (b) The regions in which the high-risk offspring had significantly lower gray matter volumes than the healthy controls. (c) and (d) The regions in which the ultra-high-risk offspring displayed significantly higher gray matter volumes than the high-risk offspring.
Mentions: Compared with the healthy controls, the HR offspring showed significantly lower GM volumes in the right OFC and the right cerebellum. Compared to the HR offspring, the UHR offspring had significantly greater GM volumes in four regions, including the right superior frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, left parietal cortex, and the right middle and inferior occipital gyrus (Table 2 and Fig. 1, FWE-corrected p < 0.05).

Bottom Line: Compared with the HCs, the UHR offspring had significantly lower assortativity, which was suggestive of vulnerability.Finally, processing speed, visual-spatial, and general function were impaired in the UHR offspring but not in the HR offspring.The abnormalities observed in the HR offspring appear to be inherited, whereas those associated with the UHR offspring represent stage-specific changes predisposing them to developing the disorder.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neuropsychology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Department of Affective Disorders, Guangzhou Brain Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China ; Laboratory of Emotion and Cognition, Guangzhou Brain Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China ; Laboratory of Cognitive Affective Neuroscience, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT

Background: Validating the high-risk (HR) and ultra-high-risk (UHR) stages of bipolar disorder (BP) may help enable early intervention strategies.

Methods: We followed up with 44 offspring of parents with BP, subdividing into the HR and UHR categories. The offspring were aged 8-28 years and were free of any current DSM-IV diagnoses. Our multilevel, integrative approach encompassed gray matter (GM) volumes, brain network connectivity, neuropsychological performance, and clinical outcomes.

Findings: Compared with the healthy controls (HCs) (n = 33), the HR offspring (n = 26) showed GM volume reductions in the right orbitofrontal cortex. Compared with the HR offspring, the UHR offspring (n = 18) exhibited increased GM volumes in four regions. Both the HR and UHR offspring displayed abnormalities in the inferior occipital cortex regarding the measures of degree and centrality, reflecting the connections and roles of the region, respectively. In the UHR versus the HR offspring, the UHR offspring exhibited upwards-shifted small world topologies that reflect high clustering and efficiency in the brain networks. Compared with the HCs, the UHR offspring had significantly lower assortativity, which was suggestive of vulnerability. Finally, processing speed, visual-spatial, and general function were impaired in the UHR offspring but not in the HR offspring.

Interpretation: The abnormalities observed in the HR offspring appear to be inherited, whereas those associated with the UHR offspring represent stage-specific changes predisposing them to developing the disorder.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus