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Isolation of Fungi and Bacteria Associated with the Guts of Tropical Wood-Feeding Coleoptera and Determination of Their Lignocellulolytic Activities.

Rojas-Jiménez K, Hernández M - Int J Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Positive results for activities related to degradation of wood components were determined in 65% and 48% of the fungal and bacterial genera, respectively.Our results showed that both the fungal and bacterial populations were highly diverse in terms of number of species and their phylogenetic composition, although the structure of the microbial communities varied with insect host family and the surrounding environment.The recurrent identification of some lignocellulolytic-positive inhabitants suggests that particular microbial groups play important roles in providing nutritional needs for the Coleopteran host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad, Apartado Postal 22-3100, Santo Domingo, Heredia, Costa Rica ; Universidad Latina de Costa Rica, Campus San Pedro, Apartado Postal 10138-1000, San José, Costa Rica.

ABSTRACT
The guts of beetle larvae constitute a complex system where relationships among fungi, bacteria, and the insect host occur. In this study, we collected larvae of five families of wood-feeding Coleoptera in tropical forests of Costa Rica, isolated fungi and bacteria from their intestinal tracts, and determined the presence of five different pathways for lignocellulolytic activity. The fungal isolates were assigned to three phyla, 16 orders, 24 families, and 40 genera; Trichoderma was the most abundant genus, detected in all insect families and at all sites. The bacterial isolates were assigned to five phyla, 13 orders, 22 families, and 35 genera; Bacillus, Serratia, and Pseudomonas were the dominant genera, present in all the Coleopteran families. Positive results for activities related to degradation of wood components were determined in 65% and 48% of the fungal and bacterial genera, respectively. Our results showed that both the fungal and bacterial populations were highly diverse in terms of number of species and their phylogenetic composition, although the structure of the microbial communities varied with insect host family and the surrounding environment. The recurrent identification of some lignocellulolytic-positive inhabitants suggests that particular microbial groups play important roles in providing nutritional needs for the Coleopteran host.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Heatmap of the abundance distribution of fungal communities associated with the guts of five wood-feeding families of Coleoptera. The taxonomic relationship of the fungal genera is shown in the rows, while the clustering of the coleopteran families, determined by their composition similarities, is shown in the columns. Higher intensities of the color reveal higher abundances of the isolates.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Heatmap of the abundance distribution of fungal communities associated with the guts of five wood-feeding families of Coleoptera. The taxonomic relationship of the fungal genera is shown in the rows, while the clustering of the coleopteran families, determined by their composition similarities, is shown in the columns. Higher intensities of the color reveal higher abundances of the isolates.

Mentions: We performed community analysis with Vegan to gain insight into how the microbial gut composition of the beetle families related to one another. This approach clustered the environments according to Bray-Curtis distances of the abundance distribution of the isolates, considering also their phylogenetic relationships. The results showed that the fungal composition of the isolates associated with larvae of Cerambycidae, Scarabaeidae, and Passalidae clustered together; Cerambycidae and Passalidae shared one order of Basidiomycota and three orders of Ascomycota, while Scarabaeidae and Passalidae had in common four orders of Ascomycota. A second cluster was formed by the fungal microbiotas isolated from Tenebrionidae and Elateridae; they shared two orders of Ascomycota and one of Basidiomycota (Figure 1). The analysis of the bacterial dataset showed that the microbial compositions associated with Scarabaeidae and Passalidae formed part of the same cluster, sharing isolates belonging to β- and γ-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The second cluster was formed by Tenebrionidae, Elateridae, and Cerambycidae that shared isolates assigned to Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, and Bacillales (Figure 2). In addition, we performed canonical correspondence analysis for exploring relationships between the microbial communities of the coleopteran hosts. Results of this analysis where consistent with results obtained with the Bray-Curtis clustering for both the fungal and bacterial communities (Figure S1 in Supplementary Material available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/285018).


Isolation of Fungi and Bacteria Associated with the Guts of Tropical Wood-Feeding Coleoptera and Determination of Their Lignocellulolytic Activities.

Rojas-Jiménez K, Hernández M - Int J Microbiol (2015)

Heatmap of the abundance distribution of fungal communities associated with the guts of five wood-feeding families of Coleoptera. The taxonomic relationship of the fungal genera is shown in the rows, while the clustering of the coleopteran families, determined by their composition similarities, is shown in the columns. Higher intensities of the color reveal higher abundances of the isolates.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563095&req=5

fig1: Heatmap of the abundance distribution of fungal communities associated with the guts of five wood-feeding families of Coleoptera. The taxonomic relationship of the fungal genera is shown in the rows, while the clustering of the coleopteran families, determined by their composition similarities, is shown in the columns. Higher intensities of the color reveal higher abundances of the isolates.
Mentions: We performed community analysis with Vegan to gain insight into how the microbial gut composition of the beetle families related to one another. This approach clustered the environments according to Bray-Curtis distances of the abundance distribution of the isolates, considering also their phylogenetic relationships. The results showed that the fungal composition of the isolates associated with larvae of Cerambycidae, Scarabaeidae, and Passalidae clustered together; Cerambycidae and Passalidae shared one order of Basidiomycota and three orders of Ascomycota, while Scarabaeidae and Passalidae had in common four orders of Ascomycota. A second cluster was formed by the fungal microbiotas isolated from Tenebrionidae and Elateridae; they shared two orders of Ascomycota and one of Basidiomycota (Figure 1). The analysis of the bacterial dataset showed that the microbial compositions associated with Scarabaeidae and Passalidae formed part of the same cluster, sharing isolates belonging to β- and γ-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The second cluster was formed by Tenebrionidae, Elateridae, and Cerambycidae that shared isolates assigned to Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, and Bacillales (Figure 2). In addition, we performed canonical correspondence analysis for exploring relationships between the microbial communities of the coleopteran hosts. Results of this analysis where consistent with results obtained with the Bray-Curtis clustering for both the fungal and bacterial communities (Figure S1 in Supplementary Material available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/285018).

Bottom Line: Positive results for activities related to degradation of wood components were determined in 65% and 48% of the fungal and bacterial genera, respectively.Our results showed that both the fungal and bacterial populations were highly diverse in terms of number of species and their phylogenetic composition, although the structure of the microbial communities varied with insect host family and the surrounding environment.The recurrent identification of some lignocellulolytic-positive inhabitants suggests that particular microbial groups play important roles in providing nutritional needs for the Coleopteran host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad, Apartado Postal 22-3100, Santo Domingo, Heredia, Costa Rica ; Universidad Latina de Costa Rica, Campus San Pedro, Apartado Postal 10138-1000, San José, Costa Rica.

ABSTRACT
The guts of beetle larvae constitute a complex system where relationships among fungi, bacteria, and the insect host occur. In this study, we collected larvae of five families of wood-feeding Coleoptera in tropical forests of Costa Rica, isolated fungi and bacteria from their intestinal tracts, and determined the presence of five different pathways for lignocellulolytic activity. The fungal isolates were assigned to three phyla, 16 orders, 24 families, and 40 genera; Trichoderma was the most abundant genus, detected in all insect families and at all sites. The bacterial isolates were assigned to five phyla, 13 orders, 22 families, and 35 genera; Bacillus, Serratia, and Pseudomonas were the dominant genera, present in all the Coleopteran families. Positive results for activities related to degradation of wood components were determined in 65% and 48% of the fungal and bacterial genera, respectively. Our results showed that both the fungal and bacterial populations were highly diverse in terms of number of species and their phylogenetic composition, although the structure of the microbial communities varied with insect host family and the surrounding environment. The recurrent identification of some lignocellulolytic-positive inhabitants suggests that particular microbial groups play important roles in providing nutritional needs for the Coleopteran host.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus