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One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients' Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study.

Chiang KJ, Chen TH, Hsieh HT, Tsai JC, Ou KL, Chou KR - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P < 0.001).Similar effects were seen on the HRSD.ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan ; Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Sec. 2, No. 325 Chenggong Road, Taipei City 11490, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year) effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT) on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT) or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group) and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ). Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks), posttest (after 12 therapy sessions), and short- (3 months), medium- (6 months), and long-term (12 months) follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P < 0.001). Similar effects were seen on the HRSD. ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P < 0.001). We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in BDI-II scores at the various follow-up assessments.
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fig2: Changes in BDI-II scores at the various follow-up assessments.

Mentions: Table 2 presents average values of the HRSD and BDI-II scores. After CBGT, the average BDI-II score of the experimental group was reduced from 40.30 (SD = 9.09) points at the pretest to 10.17 (SD = 4.33) points at the posttest. The average score at the 1-month follow-up was 9.09 (SD = 3.39) points, 11.47 (SD = 3.73) points at the 3-month follow-up, 12.87 (SD = 4.34) points at the 6-month follow-up, and 12.10 (SD = 4.64) points at the 12-month follow-up. After CBGT, the average weekly BDI-II score for the experimental group was significantly reduced at week four to 24.18 points; at week eight it was 17.82 points, and the effectiveness was maintained for 1 year (Figure 2). Before the group intervention, the average HRSD score for the experimental group was 40.37 (SD = 9.46) points; after the group intervention, the average score on the posttest was 8.77 (SD = 3.99) points. The average score on the 1-month follow-up test was 10.03 (SD = 3.19) points, 11.73 (SD = 3.61) points on the 3-month follow-up test, 13.27 (SD = 4.06) points on the 6-month follow-up test, and 12.90 (SD = 3.75) points on the 12-month follow-up test (Table 2). Figure 3 shows that, after CBGT, the average weekly HRSD score for the experimental group was significantly reduced at week four to 26.14 points and at week eight to 17.64 points, and the effectiveness was maintained for 1 year. Effect size for the difference between the intervention and control conditions at 12 month follow-up is 0.55.


One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients' Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study.

Chiang KJ, Chen TH, Hsieh HT, Tsai JC, Ou KL, Chou KR - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Changes in BDI-II scores at the various follow-up assessments.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563093&req=5

fig2: Changes in BDI-II scores at the various follow-up assessments.
Mentions: Table 2 presents average values of the HRSD and BDI-II scores. After CBGT, the average BDI-II score of the experimental group was reduced from 40.30 (SD = 9.09) points at the pretest to 10.17 (SD = 4.33) points at the posttest. The average score at the 1-month follow-up was 9.09 (SD = 3.39) points, 11.47 (SD = 3.73) points at the 3-month follow-up, 12.87 (SD = 4.34) points at the 6-month follow-up, and 12.10 (SD = 4.64) points at the 12-month follow-up. After CBGT, the average weekly BDI-II score for the experimental group was significantly reduced at week four to 24.18 points; at week eight it was 17.82 points, and the effectiveness was maintained for 1 year (Figure 2). Before the group intervention, the average HRSD score for the experimental group was 40.37 (SD = 9.46) points; after the group intervention, the average score on the posttest was 8.77 (SD = 3.99) points. The average score on the 1-month follow-up test was 10.03 (SD = 3.19) points, 11.73 (SD = 3.61) points on the 3-month follow-up test, 13.27 (SD = 4.06) points on the 6-month follow-up test, and 12.90 (SD = 3.75) points on the 12-month follow-up test (Table 2). Figure 3 shows that, after CBGT, the average weekly HRSD score for the experimental group was significantly reduced at week four to 26.14 points and at week eight to 17.64 points, and the effectiveness was maintained for 1 year. Effect size for the difference between the intervention and control conditions at 12 month follow-up is 0.55.

Bottom Line: After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P < 0.001).Similar effects were seen on the HRSD.ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan ; Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Sec. 2, No. 325 Chenggong Road, Taipei City 11490, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year) effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT) on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT) or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group) and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ). Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks), posttest (after 12 therapy sessions), and short- (3 months), medium- (6 months), and long-term (12 months) follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P < 0.001). Similar effects were seen on the HRSD. ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P < 0.001). We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus