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The translational study of apathy-an ecological approach.

Cathomas F, Hartmann MN, Seifritz E, Pryce CR, Kaiser S - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Apathy, a quantitative reduction in goal-directed behavior, is a prevalent symptom dimension with a negative impact on functional outcome in various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and depression.We first discuss the paucity of current translational approaches regarding animal equivalents of psychopathological assessment of apathy.In conclusion, the translational ecological study of apathy in humans and rodents is possible and will constitute an important approach to increase the understanding of the neurobiological bases of apathy and the development of novel treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Preclinical Laboratory for Translational Research into Affective Disorders (PLaTRAD), Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich Zurich, Switzerland ; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich Zurich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Apathy, a quantitative reduction in goal-directed behavior, is a prevalent symptom dimension with a negative impact on functional outcome in various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and depression. The aim of this review is to show that interview-based assessment of apathy in humans and observation of spontaneous rodent behavior in an ecological setting can serve as an important complementary approach to already existing task-based assessment, to study and understand the neurobiological bases of apathy. We first discuss the paucity of current translational approaches regarding animal equivalents of psychopathological assessment of apathy. We then present the existing evaluation scales for the assessment of apathy in humans and propose five sub-domains of apathy, namely self-care, social interaction, exploration, work/education and recreation. Each of the items in apathy evaluation scales can be assigned to one of these sub-domains. We then show that corresponding, well-validated behavioral readouts exist for rodents and that, indeed, three of the five human apathy sub-domains have a rodent equivalent. In conclusion, the translational ecological study of apathy in humans and rodents is possible and will constitute an important approach to increase the understanding of the neurobiological bases of apathy and the development of novel treatments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Different approaches can be used to translate human symptoms into animal behavior readouts, and vice versa. One approach (task-dependent) is to assess behavior at the level of discrete task performance. The ecological approach aims to link human psychopathological assessment with observation of spontaneous animal behavior.
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Figure 1: Different approaches can be used to translate human symptoms into animal behavior readouts, and vice versa. One approach (task-dependent) is to assess behavior at the level of discrete task performance. The ecological approach aims to link human psychopathological assessment with observation of spontaneous animal behavior.

Mentions: Driven largely by its impact on functional outcome and resistance to current treatments, apathy is becoming an increasing focus of psychiatric research (Simpson et al., 2012; Foussias et al., 2015). Interview-based rating scales remain the gold standard in the clinical assessment of apathy. Obviously, a direct translation to animal models is not possible. However, the information obtained through interview-based assessments can, at least in part, be assessed through the observation of spontaneous animal behavior. This approach will be the focus of the present review. Another way used to circumvent these challenges of translational research has involved the establishment of discrete neuropsychological tasks in humans and of equivalent tasks in various animal models (Figure 1). For example, several groups have applied tasks to assess effort-based decision-making in humans and animals as a behavioral proxy for motivational deficits (e.g., Gold et al., 2013; Fervaha et al., 2013; Markou et al., 2013; Hartmann et al., 2014; Salamone et al., 2015).


The translational study of apathy-an ecological approach.

Cathomas F, Hartmann MN, Seifritz E, Pryce CR, Kaiser S - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Different approaches can be used to translate human symptoms into animal behavior readouts, and vice versa. One approach (task-dependent) is to assess behavior at the level of discrete task performance. The ecological approach aims to link human psychopathological assessment with observation of spontaneous animal behavior.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563080&req=5

Figure 1: Different approaches can be used to translate human symptoms into animal behavior readouts, and vice versa. One approach (task-dependent) is to assess behavior at the level of discrete task performance. The ecological approach aims to link human psychopathological assessment with observation of spontaneous animal behavior.
Mentions: Driven largely by its impact on functional outcome and resistance to current treatments, apathy is becoming an increasing focus of psychiatric research (Simpson et al., 2012; Foussias et al., 2015). Interview-based rating scales remain the gold standard in the clinical assessment of apathy. Obviously, a direct translation to animal models is not possible. However, the information obtained through interview-based assessments can, at least in part, be assessed through the observation of spontaneous animal behavior. This approach will be the focus of the present review. Another way used to circumvent these challenges of translational research has involved the establishment of discrete neuropsychological tasks in humans and of equivalent tasks in various animal models (Figure 1). For example, several groups have applied tasks to assess effort-based decision-making in humans and animals as a behavioral proxy for motivational deficits (e.g., Gold et al., 2013; Fervaha et al., 2013; Markou et al., 2013; Hartmann et al., 2014; Salamone et al., 2015).

Bottom Line: Apathy, a quantitative reduction in goal-directed behavior, is a prevalent symptom dimension with a negative impact on functional outcome in various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and depression.We first discuss the paucity of current translational approaches regarding animal equivalents of psychopathological assessment of apathy.In conclusion, the translational ecological study of apathy in humans and rodents is possible and will constitute an important approach to increase the understanding of the neurobiological bases of apathy and the development of novel treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Preclinical Laboratory for Translational Research into Affective Disorders (PLaTRAD), Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich Zurich, Switzerland ; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich Zurich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Apathy, a quantitative reduction in goal-directed behavior, is a prevalent symptom dimension with a negative impact on functional outcome in various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and depression. The aim of this review is to show that interview-based assessment of apathy in humans and observation of spontaneous rodent behavior in an ecological setting can serve as an important complementary approach to already existing task-based assessment, to study and understand the neurobiological bases of apathy. We first discuss the paucity of current translational approaches regarding animal equivalents of psychopathological assessment of apathy. We then present the existing evaluation scales for the assessment of apathy in humans and propose five sub-domains of apathy, namely self-care, social interaction, exploration, work/education and recreation. Each of the items in apathy evaluation scales can be assigned to one of these sub-domains. We then show that corresponding, well-validated behavioral readouts exist for rodents and that, indeed, three of the five human apathy sub-domains have a rodent equivalent. In conclusion, the translational ecological study of apathy in humans and rodents is possible and will constitute an important approach to increase the understanding of the neurobiological bases of apathy and the development of novel treatments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus