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Arthroscopic treatment for chronic lateral epicondylitis.

Terra BB, Rodrigues LM, Filho AN, de Almeida GD, Cavatte JM, De Nadai A - Rev Bras Ortop (2015)

Bottom Line: No correlations were observed using the Spearman test between the results and age, gender, length of time with symptoms before the operation or injury mechanism (p > 0.05).It also allowed excellent viewing of the joint space for diagnosing and treating associated pathological conditions, with a minimally invasive procedure.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To report the clinical and functional results from arthroscopic release of the short radial extensor of the carpus (SREC) in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis that was refractory to conservative treatment.

Methods: Over the period from January 2012 to November 2013, 15 patients underwent arthroscopic treatment. The surgical technique used was the one described by Romeo and Cohen, based on anatomical studies on cadavers. The inclusion criteria were that the patients needed to present lateral epicondylitis and that conservative treatment (analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents, corticoid infiltration or physiotherapy) had failed over a period of more than six months. The patients were evaluated based on the elbow functional score of the Mayo Clinic, Nirschl's staging system and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain.

Results: A total of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women) were included. The mean Mayo elbow functional score after the operation was 95 (ranging from 90 to 100). The pain VAS improved from a mean of 9.2 before the operation to 0.64 after the operation. On Nirschl's scale, the patients presented an improvement from a mean of 6.5 before the operation to approximately one. There were significant differences from before to after the surgery for the three functional scores used (p < 0.01). No correlations were observed using the Spearman test between the results and age, gender, length of time with symptoms before the operation or injury mechanism (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for lateral epicondylitis was shown to be a safe and effective therapeutic option when appropriately indicated and performed, in refractory cases of chronic lateral epicondylitis. It also allowed excellent viewing of the joint space for diagnosing and treating associated pathological conditions, with a minimally invasive procedure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Arthroscopic portals drawn on the right elbow.
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fig0015: Arthroscopic portals drawn on the right elbow.

Mentions: The patient was positioned in ventral decubitus with a support for the upper limb that allowed a range of motion of 120 degrees, from flexion to complete extension. A sterile manual tourniquet was used at the level of the middle third of the arm. The anatomical references (medial and lateral epicondyle, radial head, olecranon and ulnar nerve) and arthroscopic portals (proximal anteromedial and anterolateral and, in some cases, the standard posterior and posterolateral) were marked on the skin, as illustrated in Fig. 3, Fig. 4.


Arthroscopic treatment for chronic lateral epicondylitis.

Terra BB, Rodrigues LM, Filho AN, de Almeida GD, Cavatte JM, De Nadai A - Rev Bras Ortop (2015)

Arthroscopic portals drawn on the right elbow.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563054&req=5

fig0015: Arthroscopic portals drawn on the right elbow.
Mentions: The patient was positioned in ventral decubitus with a support for the upper limb that allowed a range of motion of 120 degrees, from flexion to complete extension. A sterile manual tourniquet was used at the level of the middle third of the arm. The anatomical references (medial and lateral epicondyle, radial head, olecranon and ulnar nerve) and arthroscopic portals (proximal anteromedial and anterolateral and, in some cases, the standard posterior and posterolateral) were marked on the skin, as illustrated in Fig. 3, Fig. 4.

Bottom Line: No correlations were observed using the Spearman test between the results and age, gender, length of time with symptoms before the operation or injury mechanism (p > 0.05).It also allowed excellent viewing of the joint space for diagnosing and treating associated pathological conditions, with a minimally invasive procedure.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To report the clinical and functional results from arthroscopic release of the short radial extensor of the carpus (SREC) in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis that was refractory to conservative treatment.

Methods: Over the period from January 2012 to November 2013, 15 patients underwent arthroscopic treatment. The surgical technique used was the one described by Romeo and Cohen, based on anatomical studies on cadavers. The inclusion criteria were that the patients needed to present lateral epicondylitis and that conservative treatment (analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents, corticoid infiltration or physiotherapy) had failed over a period of more than six months. The patients were evaluated based on the elbow functional score of the Mayo Clinic, Nirschl's staging system and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain.

Results: A total of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women) were included. The mean Mayo elbow functional score after the operation was 95 (ranging from 90 to 100). The pain VAS improved from a mean of 9.2 before the operation to 0.64 after the operation. On Nirschl's scale, the patients presented an improvement from a mean of 6.5 before the operation to approximately one. There were significant differences from before to after the surgery for the three functional scores used (p < 0.01). No correlations were observed using the Spearman test between the results and age, gender, length of time with symptoms before the operation or injury mechanism (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for lateral epicondylitis was shown to be a safe and effective therapeutic option when appropriately indicated and performed, in refractory cases of chronic lateral epicondylitis. It also allowed excellent viewing of the joint space for diagnosing and treating associated pathological conditions, with a minimally invasive procedure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus