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Injuries to posterolateral corner of the knee: a comprehensive review from anatomy to surgical treatment.

Crespo B, James EW, Metsavaht L, LaPrade RF - Rev Bras Ortop (2014)

Bottom Line: Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized.Although also once considered to be the "dark side of the knee", increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, United States.

ABSTRACT
Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized. Although also once considered to be the "dark side of the knee", increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations. The management of posterolateral corner injuries has also evolved and good outcomes have been reported after operative treatment following anatomical reconstruction principles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anatomical reconstruction of the posterolateral corner with two free grafts reconstructing the three major structures, through two femoral tunnels, one tibial tunnel and one fibular tunnel. (Reprinted with permission from Am J Sports Med. 2010;38:1674–1680.).
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fig0010: Anatomical reconstruction of the posterolateral corner with two free grafts reconstructing the three major structures, through two femoral tunnels, one tibial tunnel and one fibular tunnel. (Reprinted with permission from Am J Sports Med. 2010;38:1674–1680.).

Mentions: The authors’ preferred technique is an anatomical reconstruction for the PLC (Fig. 2), which has been biomechanically43 and clinically validated11 and shown to re-establish stability and clinical outcomes.44 A hockey stick incision extending from the femoral shaft and lateral femoral condyle to the area between Gerdy's tubercle and the fibula head is performed to develop a posterior-based skin flap. Next, dissection is carried down to the superficial layer of the IT band and the fascial layer of the biceps. Identification, isolation, and protection of the common peroneal are performed next. The nerve is usually found posterior to the long head of the biceps femoris muscle and a neurolysis is performed allowing safe assess to the posterior aspect of the knee. A small horizontal incision is created over the biceps bursa, exposing the FCL distal fibers and fibular attachment.


Injuries to posterolateral corner of the knee: a comprehensive review from anatomy to surgical treatment.

Crespo B, James EW, Metsavaht L, LaPrade RF - Rev Bras Ortop (2014)

Anatomical reconstruction of the posterolateral corner with two free grafts reconstructing the three major structures, through two femoral tunnels, one tibial tunnel and one fibular tunnel. (Reprinted with permission from Am J Sports Med. 2010;38:1674–1680.).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563052&req=5

fig0010: Anatomical reconstruction of the posterolateral corner with two free grafts reconstructing the three major structures, through two femoral tunnels, one tibial tunnel and one fibular tunnel. (Reprinted with permission from Am J Sports Med. 2010;38:1674–1680.).
Mentions: The authors’ preferred technique is an anatomical reconstruction for the PLC (Fig. 2), which has been biomechanically43 and clinically validated11 and shown to re-establish stability and clinical outcomes.44 A hockey stick incision extending from the femoral shaft and lateral femoral condyle to the area between Gerdy's tubercle and the fibula head is performed to develop a posterior-based skin flap. Next, dissection is carried down to the superficial layer of the IT band and the fascial layer of the biceps. Identification, isolation, and protection of the common peroneal are performed next. The nerve is usually found posterior to the long head of the biceps femoris muscle and a neurolysis is performed allowing safe assess to the posterior aspect of the knee. A small horizontal incision is created over the biceps bursa, exposing the FCL distal fibers and fibular attachment.

Bottom Line: Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized.Although also once considered to be the "dark side of the knee", increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, United States.

ABSTRACT
Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized. Although also once considered to be the "dark side of the knee", increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations. The management of posterolateral corner injuries has also evolved and good outcomes have been reported after operative treatment following anatomical reconstruction principles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus