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Injuries to posterolateral corner of the knee: a comprehensive review from anatomy to surgical treatment.

Crespo B, James EW, Metsavaht L, LaPrade RF - Rev Bras Ortop (2014)

Bottom Line: Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized.Although also once considered to be the "dark side of the knee", increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, United States.

ABSTRACT
Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized. Although also once considered to be the "dark side of the knee", increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations. The management of posterolateral corner injuries has also evolved and good outcomes have been reported after operative treatment following anatomical reconstruction principles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anatomy of the posterolateral corner is represented (A) with the three main structures responsible for lateral side stability: popliteus tendon, popliteofibular ligament and fibular collateral ligament. The anatomical footprints of these structures are highlighted in (B) B. (Reprinted with permission from Am J Sports Med. 2003;31:854–860.).
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fig0005: Anatomy of the posterolateral corner is represented (A) with the three main structures responsible for lateral side stability: popliteus tendon, popliteofibular ligament and fibular collateral ligament. The anatomical footprints of these structures are highlighted in (B) B. (Reprinted with permission from Am J Sports Med. 2003;31:854–860.).

Mentions: Appreciation of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the PLC is critical for understanding the physical exam, imaging, and treatment of PLC injuries. The main structures that provide stability to the lateral aspect of the knee are the fibular collateral ligament (FCL), popliteus tendon, and popliteofibular ligament.8, 12, 13, 14, 15 (Fig. 1).


Injuries to posterolateral corner of the knee: a comprehensive review from anatomy to surgical treatment.

Crespo B, James EW, Metsavaht L, LaPrade RF - Rev Bras Ortop (2014)

Anatomy of the posterolateral corner is represented (A) with the three main structures responsible for lateral side stability: popliteus tendon, popliteofibular ligament and fibular collateral ligament. The anatomical footprints of these structures are highlighted in (B) B. (Reprinted with permission from Am J Sports Med. 2003;31:854–860.).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563052&req=5

fig0005: Anatomy of the posterolateral corner is represented (A) with the three main structures responsible for lateral side stability: popliteus tendon, popliteofibular ligament and fibular collateral ligament. The anatomical footprints of these structures are highlighted in (B) B. (Reprinted with permission from Am J Sports Med. 2003;31:854–860.).
Mentions: Appreciation of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the PLC is critical for understanding the physical exam, imaging, and treatment of PLC injuries. The main structures that provide stability to the lateral aspect of the knee are the fibular collateral ligament (FCL), popliteus tendon, and popliteofibular ligament.8, 12, 13, 14, 15 (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized.Although also once considered to be the "dark side of the knee", increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, United States.

ABSTRACT
Although injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee were previously considered to be a rare condition, they have been shown to be present in almost 16% of all knee injuries and are responsible for sustained instability and failure of concomitant reconstructions if not properly recognized. Although also once considered to be the "dark side of the knee", increased knowledge of the posterolateral corner anatomy and biomechanics has led to improved diagnostic ability with better understanding of physical and imaging examinations. The management of posterolateral corner injuries has also evolved and good outcomes have been reported after operative treatment following anatomical reconstruction principles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus