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Measurement of the tendon of the biceps brachii after tenotomy: study on cadavers.

Machado AC, Ribeiro FR, Martins SM, Brasil-Filho R, Tenor-Junior AC, da Costa MP - Rev Bras Ortop (2015)

Bottom Line: However, no statistical differences were observed between the different forearm positions, between the sides, genders and ages of the cadavers studied.Progressive extension of the elbow caused progressive distal excursion of the LHB, but without interference in the forearm position, gender, side or age of the cadavers studied.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the influence of elbow and forearm range of motion on the distal excursion of the long head of the biceps (LHB).

Methods: The distal excursion of the LHB after tenotomy of the shoulders of eight cadavers was ascertained by measuring the distance between a point marked out on the LHB, 3 cm from the anterolateral border of the acromion, and its position at different degrees of elbow flexion, using a digital pachymeter. The measurements at elbow flexion of 135°, 90°, 45° and 0° were noted: these angles were established using a goniometer. The measurements were made with the forearm in neutral, supination and pronation positions.

Results: Differences between the mean measurements of the distal excursion of the LHB (total sample) were observed between the degrees of elbow flexion (p < 0.01). However, no statistical differences were observed between the different forearm positions, between the sides, genders and ages of the cadavers studied.

Conclusion: Progressive extension of the elbow caused progressive distal excursion of the LHB, but without interference in the forearm position, gender, side or age of the cadavers studied.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tenotomy procedure on a cadaver. (A) Marking out the bone anatomical parameters and access route; (B) access via anterolateral route; (C) dissection of the LHB from its groove to its origin in the glenoid; (D) measurement of the excursion of the LHB after proximal tenotomy, with elbow flexion at 135°, 90°, 45° and 0°.
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fig0005: Tenotomy procedure on a cadaver. (A) Marking out the bone anatomical parameters and access route; (B) access via anterolateral route; (C) dissection of the LHB from its groove to its origin in the glenoid; (D) measurement of the excursion of the LHB after proximal tenotomy, with elbow flexion at 135°, 90°, 45° and 0°.

Mentions: This study was approved by our institution's research ethics committee (number: CAAE 19893114.6.0000.5463). Sixteen shoulders of eight cadavers obtained from the Death Verification Service of the University of São Paulo (SVOC-USP) were dissected. None of these cadavers presented any fractures of the upper limbs, local deformities or scarring. The dissections were performed by means of an anterolateral access measuring 10 cm (Fig. 1A), followed by dissection between the anterior and lateral deltoid muscle (Fig. 1B) so as to approach and dissect the LHB (Fig. 1C).


Measurement of the tendon of the biceps brachii after tenotomy: study on cadavers.

Machado AC, Ribeiro FR, Martins SM, Brasil-Filho R, Tenor-Junior AC, da Costa MP - Rev Bras Ortop (2015)

Tenotomy procedure on a cadaver. (A) Marking out the bone anatomical parameters and access route; (B) access via anterolateral route; (C) dissection of the LHB from its groove to its origin in the glenoid; (D) measurement of the excursion of the LHB after proximal tenotomy, with elbow flexion at 135°, 90°, 45° and 0°.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563048&req=5

fig0005: Tenotomy procedure on a cadaver. (A) Marking out the bone anatomical parameters and access route; (B) access via anterolateral route; (C) dissection of the LHB from its groove to its origin in the glenoid; (D) measurement of the excursion of the LHB after proximal tenotomy, with elbow flexion at 135°, 90°, 45° and 0°.
Mentions: This study was approved by our institution's research ethics committee (number: CAAE 19893114.6.0000.5463). Sixteen shoulders of eight cadavers obtained from the Death Verification Service of the University of São Paulo (SVOC-USP) were dissected. None of these cadavers presented any fractures of the upper limbs, local deformities or scarring. The dissections were performed by means of an anterolateral access measuring 10 cm (Fig. 1A), followed by dissection between the anterior and lateral deltoid muscle (Fig. 1B) so as to approach and dissect the LHB (Fig. 1C).

Bottom Line: However, no statistical differences were observed between the different forearm positions, between the sides, genders and ages of the cadavers studied.Progressive extension of the elbow caused progressive distal excursion of the LHB, but without interference in the forearm position, gender, side or age of the cadavers studied.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the influence of elbow and forearm range of motion on the distal excursion of the long head of the biceps (LHB).

Methods: The distal excursion of the LHB after tenotomy of the shoulders of eight cadavers was ascertained by measuring the distance between a point marked out on the LHB, 3 cm from the anterolateral border of the acromion, and its position at different degrees of elbow flexion, using a digital pachymeter. The measurements at elbow flexion of 135°, 90°, 45° and 0° were noted: these angles were established using a goniometer. The measurements were made with the forearm in neutral, supination and pronation positions.

Results: Differences between the mean measurements of the distal excursion of the LHB (total sample) were observed between the degrees of elbow flexion (p < 0.01). However, no statistical differences were observed between the different forearm positions, between the sides, genders and ages of the cadavers studied.

Conclusion: Progressive extension of the elbow caused progressive distal excursion of the LHB, but without interference in the forearm position, gender, side or age of the cadavers studied.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus