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Distinctive receptive field and physiological properties of a wide-field amacrine cell in the macaque monkey retina.

Manookin MB, Puller C, Rieke F, Neitz J, Neitz M - J. Neurophysiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, stimulation well outside of the classical receptive field can exert clear and significant effects on visual processing.Given the distances over which they occur, the retinal mechanisms responsible for these long-range effects would certainly require signal propagation via active membrane properties.Wiry cells integrate signals over space much more effectively than predicted from passive signal propagation, and spatial integration is strongly attenuated during blockade of NMDA spikes but integration is insensitive to blockade of NaV channels with TTX.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; manookin@uw.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wiry cells are ON-OFF to moving objects. A: spatial receptive field of an ON-type wiry amacrine cell. B: schematic showing location of a moving square relative to the stationary receptive field. C: responses of cell in A to outwardly moving black and white squares. Solid and dashed arrows indicate onset and offset of motion, respectively. D: responses of the same cell to inwardly moving black and white squares. E: wiry cell responses to outward squares of varying velocity (n = 3 cells). F: responses to expanding ring at multiple velocities (n = 5 cells). G: responses of an OFF-type wiry amacrine cell to a rectangle (90 μm × 270 μm; contrast ±100%; speed 1.084 mm/s, 5.42°/s) moving perpendicular to long axis and inwardly along wiry cell's dendrite. H: responses of cell in G to motion perpendicular to the same dendrite.
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Figure 6: Wiry cells are ON-OFF to moving objects. A: spatial receptive field of an ON-type wiry amacrine cell. B: schematic showing location of a moving square relative to the stationary receptive field. C: responses of cell in A to outwardly moving black and white squares. Solid and dashed arrows indicate onset and offset of motion, respectively. D: responses of the same cell to inwardly moving black and white squares. E: wiry cell responses to outward squares of varying velocity (n = 3 cells). F: responses to expanding ring at multiple velocities (n = 5 cells). G: responses of an OFF-type wiry amacrine cell to a rectangle (90 μm × 270 μm; contrast ±100%; speed 1.084 mm/s, 5.42°/s) moving perpendicular to long axis and inwardly along wiry cell's dendrite. H: responses of cell in G to motion perpendicular to the same dendrite.

Mentions: To test this prediction, white and black squares were moved (90 μm × 90 μm; contrast ±100%; speed 1.084 mm/s, 5.42°/s) along one of the dendritic processes (Fig. 6, A and B). The squares either started near the soma and moved outwardly along the dendrite (Fig. 6C) or started 0.54 mm away and moved inwardly toward the soma (Fig. 6D; solid and dashed arrows indicate onset and offset of motion, respectively). As expected, the cell depolarized after the onset of inward motion of the white square, showing a peak depolarization of ∼5 mV (Fig. 6D). However, the outwardly moving square produced a similar depolarization as the inwardly moving square (Fig. 6C). Interestingly, the same ON-type wiry cells that hyperpolarized to stationary black spots depolarized to black moving squares (Fig. 6, C and D). To determine whether this nonlinear response to moving objects was dependent on speed, we repeated the moving square experiment at four speeds between 2 and 10°/s (0.5–2.5 mm/s; Fig. 6E). The peak response was similar for the black and white squares across the range of speeds tested. In addition to moving squares, we used expanding or contracting rings to test the response symmetry to white and black moving objects. As with the moving squares, expanding and contracting rings produced similar peak depolarizations for white and black stimuli (Fig. 6F).


Distinctive receptive field and physiological properties of a wide-field amacrine cell in the macaque monkey retina.

Manookin MB, Puller C, Rieke F, Neitz J, Neitz M - J. Neurophysiol. (2015)

Wiry cells are ON-OFF to moving objects. A: spatial receptive field of an ON-type wiry amacrine cell. B: schematic showing location of a moving square relative to the stationary receptive field. C: responses of cell in A to outwardly moving black and white squares. Solid and dashed arrows indicate onset and offset of motion, respectively. D: responses of the same cell to inwardly moving black and white squares. E: wiry cell responses to outward squares of varying velocity (n = 3 cells). F: responses to expanding ring at multiple velocities (n = 5 cells). G: responses of an OFF-type wiry amacrine cell to a rectangle (90 μm × 270 μm; contrast ±100%; speed 1.084 mm/s, 5.42°/s) moving perpendicular to long axis and inwardly along wiry cell's dendrite. H: responses of cell in G to motion perpendicular to the same dendrite.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 6: Wiry cells are ON-OFF to moving objects. A: spatial receptive field of an ON-type wiry amacrine cell. B: schematic showing location of a moving square relative to the stationary receptive field. C: responses of cell in A to outwardly moving black and white squares. Solid and dashed arrows indicate onset and offset of motion, respectively. D: responses of the same cell to inwardly moving black and white squares. E: wiry cell responses to outward squares of varying velocity (n = 3 cells). F: responses to expanding ring at multiple velocities (n = 5 cells). G: responses of an OFF-type wiry amacrine cell to a rectangle (90 μm × 270 μm; contrast ±100%; speed 1.084 mm/s, 5.42°/s) moving perpendicular to long axis and inwardly along wiry cell's dendrite. H: responses of cell in G to motion perpendicular to the same dendrite.
Mentions: To test this prediction, white and black squares were moved (90 μm × 90 μm; contrast ±100%; speed 1.084 mm/s, 5.42°/s) along one of the dendritic processes (Fig. 6, A and B). The squares either started near the soma and moved outwardly along the dendrite (Fig. 6C) or started 0.54 mm away and moved inwardly toward the soma (Fig. 6D; solid and dashed arrows indicate onset and offset of motion, respectively). As expected, the cell depolarized after the onset of inward motion of the white square, showing a peak depolarization of ∼5 mV (Fig. 6D). However, the outwardly moving square produced a similar depolarization as the inwardly moving square (Fig. 6C). Interestingly, the same ON-type wiry cells that hyperpolarized to stationary black spots depolarized to black moving squares (Fig. 6, C and D). To determine whether this nonlinear response to moving objects was dependent on speed, we repeated the moving square experiment at four speeds between 2 and 10°/s (0.5–2.5 mm/s; Fig. 6E). The peak response was similar for the black and white squares across the range of speeds tested. In addition to moving squares, we used expanding or contracting rings to test the response symmetry to white and black moving objects. As with the moving squares, expanding and contracting rings produced similar peak depolarizations for white and black stimuli (Fig. 6F).

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, stimulation well outside of the classical receptive field can exert clear and significant effects on visual processing.Given the distances over which they occur, the retinal mechanisms responsible for these long-range effects would certainly require signal propagation via active membrane properties.Wiry cells integrate signals over space much more effectively than predicted from passive signal propagation, and spatial integration is strongly attenuated during blockade of NMDA spikes but integration is insensitive to blockade of NaV channels with TTX.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; manookin@uw.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus