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Distinctive receptive field and physiological properties of a wide-field amacrine cell in the macaque monkey retina.

Manookin MB, Puller C, Rieke F, Neitz J, Neitz M - J. Neurophysiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, stimulation well outside of the classical receptive field can exert clear and significant effects on visual processing.Given the distances over which they occur, the retinal mechanisms responsible for these long-range effects would certainly require signal propagation via active membrane properties.Wiry cells integrate signals over space much more effectively than predicted from passive signal propagation, and spatial integration is strongly attenuated during blockade of NMDA spikes but integration is insensitive to blockade of NaV channels with TTX.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; manookin@uw.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Spatio-temporal dependence of wiry cell receptive fields. A–E: slices through the spatio-temporal receptive field at different points in time. F: example temporal filters taken from points in the receptive field in E as indicated by arrows. G: receptive field map of cell in A–E in which the peak of each temporal filter is color-coded. H: timing of temporal filter peak in dendrites as a function of distance from center. Generally, distal dendrites peaked earlier than proximal dendrites (n = 5 cells; mean ± SE). Cyan and red lines show prediction based on passive membrane properties with fast or slow membrane time constants, respectively. I: gain of temporal filter in dendrites as function of distance from center for cells in H. Cyan and red lines indicate the prediction of the passive models corresponding to H.
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Figure 4: Spatio-temporal dependence of wiry cell receptive fields. A–E: slices through the spatio-temporal receptive field at different points in time. F: example temporal filters taken from points in the receptive field in E as indicated by arrows. G: receptive field map of cell in A–E in which the peak of each temporal filter is color-coded. H: timing of temporal filter peak in dendrites as a function of distance from center. Generally, distal dendrites peaked earlier than proximal dendrites (n = 5 cells; mean ± SE). Cyan and red lines show prediction based on passive membrane properties with fast or slow membrane time constants, respectively. I: gain of temporal filter in dendrites as function of distance from center for cells in H. Cyan and red lines indicate the prediction of the passive models corresponding to H.

Mentions: The spatial receptive fields of wiry cells demonstrated that stimulation over much of the extensive dendritic tree was transmitted to the soma (Fig. 3). In addition to a spatial receptive field map, this analysis provided insight into the spatial dependence of kinetics in wiry cells. This dependence is illustrated by taking sequential slices in time through the spatio-temporal receptive field (Fig. 4, A–E). At the earliest time point (−90 ms; Fig. 4A), stimulation of the receptive field ∼0.5–0.6 mm from the center produced voltage changes at the soma. This can be visualized in Fig. 4A as bright areas in the more distal regions of the receptive field. The receptive field map shifted over time, with bright areas moving progressively toward the center such that the areas most proximal to the recording site were visible only at later time points (Fig. 4, B and C). Several individual temporal filters were examined for systematic differences between central and more distal regions of the receptive field. Example filters taken from central and more distal regions of the receptive field displayed differences in kinetics, with distal filters peaking earlier than the central filter (Fig. 4, E and F).


Distinctive receptive field and physiological properties of a wide-field amacrine cell in the macaque monkey retina.

Manookin MB, Puller C, Rieke F, Neitz J, Neitz M - J. Neurophysiol. (2015)

Spatio-temporal dependence of wiry cell receptive fields. A–E: slices through the spatio-temporal receptive field at different points in time. F: example temporal filters taken from points in the receptive field in E as indicated by arrows. G: receptive field map of cell in A–E in which the peak of each temporal filter is color-coded. H: timing of temporal filter peak in dendrites as a function of distance from center. Generally, distal dendrites peaked earlier than proximal dendrites (n = 5 cells; mean ± SE). Cyan and red lines show prediction based on passive membrane properties with fast or slow membrane time constants, respectively. I: gain of temporal filter in dendrites as function of distance from center for cells in H. Cyan and red lines indicate the prediction of the passive models corresponding to H.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563022&req=5

Figure 4: Spatio-temporal dependence of wiry cell receptive fields. A–E: slices through the spatio-temporal receptive field at different points in time. F: example temporal filters taken from points in the receptive field in E as indicated by arrows. G: receptive field map of cell in A–E in which the peak of each temporal filter is color-coded. H: timing of temporal filter peak in dendrites as a function of distance from center. Generally, distal dendrites peaked earlier than proximal dendrites (n = 5 cells; mean ± SE). Cyan and red lines show prediction based on passive membrane properties with fast or slow membrane time constants, respectively. I: gain of temporal filter in dendrites as function of distance from center for cells in H. Cyan and red lines indicate the prediction of the passive models corresponding to H.
Mentions: The spatial receptive fields of wiry cells demonstrated that stimulation over much of the extensive dendritic tree was transmitted to the soma (Fig. 3). In addition to a spatial receptive field map, this analysis provided insight into the spatial dependence of kinetics in wiry cells. This dependence is illustrated by taking sequential slices in time through the spatio-temporal receptive field (Fig. 4, A–E). At the earliest time point (−90 ms; Fig. 4A), stimulation of the receptive field ∼0.5–0.6 mm from the center produced voltage changes at the soma. This can be visualized in Fig. 4A as bright areas in the more distal regions of the receptive field. The receptive field map shifted over time, with bright areas moving progressively toward the center such that the areas most proximal to the recording site were visible only at later time points (Fig. 4, B and C). Several individual temporal filters were examined for systematic differences between central and more distal regions of the receptive field. Example filters taken from central and more distal regions of the receptive field displayed differences in kinetics, with distal filters peaking earlier than the central filter (Fig. 4, E and F).

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, stimulation well outside of the classical receptive field can exert clear and significant effects on visual processing.Given the distances over which they occur, the retinal mechanisms responsible for these long-range effects would certainly require signal propagation via active membrane properties.Wiry cells integrate signals over space much more effectively than predicted from passive signal propagation, and spatial integration is strongly attenuated during blockade of NMDA spikes but integration is insensitive to blockade of NaV channels with TTX.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; manookin@uw.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus