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Distinctive receptive field and physiological properties of a wide-field amacrine cell in the macaque monkey retina.

Manookin MB, Puller C, Rieke F, Neitz J, Neitz M - J. Neurophysiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, stimulation well outside of the classical receptive field can exert clear and significant effects on visual processing.Given the distances over which they occur, the retinal mechanisms responsible for these long-range effects would certainly require signal propagation via active membrane properties.Wiry cells integrate signals over space much more effectively than predicted from passive signal propagation, and spatial integration is strongly attenuated during blockade of NMDA spikes but integration is insensitive to blockade of NaV channels with TTX.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; manookin@uw.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wiry cells integrate over an extensive area of space. A: spatial receptive field of a wiry amacrine cell determined with spatio-temporal white noise. B: maximum-intensity projection of confocal images from cell in A injected with Lucifer yellow. C: merge of spatial receptive field in A and dendritic morphology in B. D: normalized cross-correlation of spatial receptive field and dendritic morphology as a function of rotation angle for 5 wiry cells. Plot shows means ± SE.
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Figure 3: Wiry cells integrate over an extensive area of space. A: spatial receptive field of a wiry amacrine cell determined with spatio-temporal white noise. B: maximum-intensity projection of confocal images from cell in A injected with Lucifer yellow. C: merge of spatial receptive field in A and dendritic morphology in B. D: normalized cross-correlation of spatial receptive field and dendritic morphology as a function of rotation angle for 5 wiry cells. Plot shows means ± SE.

Mentions: An example reverse-correlation map for an ON wiry amacrine cell is shown in Fig. 3A. Unlike the classical difference-of-Gaussians center-surround organization present in the receptive fields of many neurons, it exhibited striking long and straight excitatory regions (light colors) extending in several directions from the soma, flanked by elongated, dark surround regions. Distal areas of the receptive field are grayed out, as this represents the limit of our experimental projection system (Fig. 3A). Lucifer yellow (0.1%) in the recording solution allowed recovery of the cells' morphology after fixation. For example, the morphology of the cell in Fig. 3B revealed 12 straight dendrites radiating from the soma. To determine how the spatial receptive field related to the dendritic morphology, we manually aligned the receptive field and dendrites (Fig. 3C). In many cases, such as in Fig. 3C, the dendrites appeared to be visible in the receptive field; weaker areas of correlation may be due to artifacts from tissue fixation and mounting. However, despite all of the procedural manipulation of the tissue, the correspondence between the receptive field and morphology was striking. To assess the appropriateness of our manual alignment, we calculated the cross-correlation between the receptive field and dendrites while rotating the images relative to each other. Across cells, the cross-correlation peaked at the point of manual alignment (Fig. 3D, dashed line).


Distinctive receptive field and physiological properties of a wide-field amacrine cell in the macaque monkey retina.

Manookin MB, Puller C, Rieke F, Neitz J, Neitz M - J. Neurophysiol. (2015)

Wiry cells integrate over an extensive area of space. A: spatial receptive field of a wiry amacrine cell determined with spatio-temporal white noise. B: maximum-intensity projection of confocal images from cell in A injected with Lucifer yellow. C: merge of spatial receptive field in A and dendritic morphology in B. D: normalized cross-correlation of spatial receptive field and dendritic morphology as a function of rotation angle for 5 wiry cells. Plot shows means ± SE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4563022&req=5

Figure 3: Wiry cells integrate over an extensive area of space. A: spatial receptive field of a wiry amacrine cell determined with spatio-temporal white noise. B: maximum-intensity projection of confocal images from cell in A injected with Lucifer yellow. C: merge of spatial receptive field in A and dendritic morphology in B. D: normalized cross-correlation of spatial receptive field and dendritic morphology as a function of rotation angle for 5 wiry cells. Plot shows means ± SE.
Mentions: An example reverse-correlation map for an ON wiry amacrine cell is shown in Fig. 3A. Unlike the classical difference-of-Gaussians center-surround organization present in the receptive fields of many neurons, it exhibited striking long and straight excitatory regions (light colors) extending in several directions from the soma, flanked by elongated, dark surround regions. Distal areas of the receptive field are grayed out, as this represents the limit of our experimental projection system (Fig. 3A). Lucifer yellow (0.1%) in the recording solution allowed recovery of the cells' morphology after fixation. For example, the morphology of the cell in Fig. 3B revealed 12 straight dendrites radiating from the soma. To determine how the spatial receptive field related to the dendritic morphology, we manually aligned the receptive field and dendrites (Fig. 3C). In many cases, such as in Fig. 3C, the dendrites appeared to be visible in the receptive field; weaker areas of correlation may be due to artifacts from tissue fixation and mounting. However, despite all of the procedural manipulation of the tissue, the correspondence between the receptive field and morphology was striking. To assess the appropriateness of our manual alignment, we calculated the cross-correlation between the receptive field and dendrites while rotating the images relative to each other. Across cells, the cross-correlation peaked at the point of manual alignment (Fig. 3D, dashed line).

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, stimulation well outside of the classical receptive field can exert clear and significant effects on visual processing.Given the distances over which they occur, the retinal mechanisms responsible for these long-range effects would certainly require signal propagation via active membrane properties.Wiry cells integrate signals over space much more effectively than predicted from passive signal propagation, and spatial integration is strongly attenuated during blockade of NMDA spikes but integration is insensitive to blockade of NaV channels with TTX.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; manookin@uw.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus