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Cue reactivity and its relation to craving and relapse in alcohol dependence: a combined laboratory and field study.

Witteman J, Post H, Tarvainen M, de Bruijn A, Perna Ede S, Ramaekers JG, Wiers RW - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) (2015)

Bottom Line: The results indicated that the presence of alcohol cues such as the portrayal of the drug and drinking behaviour induced physiological cue reactivity and craving.Additionally, cue reactivity and craving were positively correlated, and cue reactivity was larger for patients with shorter histories of alcohol dependence.It is concluded that the presence of alcohol cues such as portrayal of alcoholic beverages and drinking behaviour induces cue reactivity and craving in alcohol dependence through a conditioned appetitive response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Humanities, Leiden University Center for Linguistics, Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands, witteman.j@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The present study investigated the nature of physiological cue reactivity and craving in response to alcohol cues among alcohol-dependent patients (N = 80) who were enrolled in detoxification treatment. Further, the predictive value with regard to future drinking of both the magnitude of the physiological and craving response to alcohol cues while in treatment and the degree of alcohol-cue exposure in patients' natural environment was assessed. Physiological reactivity and craving in response to experimental exposure to alcohol and soft drink advertisements were measured during detoxification treatment using heart rate variability and subjective rating of craving. Following discharge, patients monitored exposure to alcohol advertisements for five consecutive weeks with a diary and were followed up with an assessment of relapse at 5 weeks and 3 months post-discharge. The results indicated that the presence of alcohol cues such as the portrayal of the drug and drinking behaviour induced physiological cue reactivity and craving. Additionally, cue reactivity and craving were positively correlated, and cue reactivity was larger for patients with shorter histories of alcohol dependence. Further, patients reported a substantial daily exposure to alcohol cues. The magnitude of cue reactivity and the craving response to alcohol cues at baseline and degree of exposure to alcohol cues in patients' natural environment did not predict relapse. It is concluded that the presence of alcohol cues such as portrayal of alcoholic beverages and drinking behaviour induces cue reactivity and craving in alcohol dependence through a conditioned appetitive response.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean EVHRV HF power during cue exposure and baseline in the block of alcohol and soft drink advertisement. Error bars indicate the 95 % confidence interval
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Fig1: Mean EVHRV HF power during cue exposure and baseline in the block of alcohol and soft drink advertisement. Error bars indicate the 95 % confidence interval

Mentions: HRV measurements for alcohol and soft drink advertisement were available for 67 patients. Wilcoxon Signed-ranks test revealed no significant difference in normalised mean HF HRV power between exposure to alcohol versus soft drink advertisement (Z = −1.56, N.S) blocks. HF absolute power measurements during exposure to an alcohol advertisement were available for 71 patients. The test-retest reliability for the mean EVHRV HF power across the eight segments between both baseline measurements was .70, indicating acceptable reliability. For the EVHRV HF power analysis, we first performed a RM-ANOVA with ads (alcohol versus soft drink) and condition (baseline, cue exposure) as the two within-subject factors and, counterbalancing order (soft drinks ads presented first versus alcohol ads presented first) as the between subject variable and HF spectral power for the five combined 8-s segments as the dependent, which revealed the critical significant ads × condition interaction (F(1,65) = 13.41, p = 0.001) and an ads × order interaction (F(1,65) = 8.92, p = 0.004). There were no other main effects or interactions. Regarding the order effect, HF power was higher during the alcohol block than the soda block when alcohol ads were presented first, while EVHRV HF power was higher during soft drink than alcohol ad exposure when soft drink ads were presented first. Follow-up Wilcoxon Signed-ranks test for the critical ads × condition interaction revealed a highly significant increase in HF power during the presentation of alcohol cues (Mdn = 100.54) as compared to during (Mdn = 89.05) pre-cue baseline (Z = 2.74, p = 0.006). Although soft drink cues decreased HF power as compared to baseline, this decrease was not significant (see Fig. 1). Using Thayer et al. (2002), we estimated the respiratory frequency during the EVHRV segments to be in between 0.23 and 0.24 Hz; hence, respiration could not have significantly affected our HF power measurements.Fig. 1


Cue reactivity and its relation to craving and relapse in alcohol dependence: a combined laboratory and field study.

Witteman J, Post H, Tarvainen M, de Bruijn A, Perna Ede S, Ramaekers JG, Wiers RW - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) (2015)

Mean EVHRV HF power during cue exposure and baseline in the block of alcohol and soft drink advertisement. Error bars indicate the 95 % confidence interval
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562995&req=5

Fig1: Mean EVHRV HF power during cue exposure and baseline in the block of alcohol and soft drink advertisement. Error bars indicate the 95 % confidence interval
Mentions: HRV measurements for alcohol and soft drink advertisement were available for 67 patients. Wilcoxon Signed-ranks test revealed no significant difference in normalised mean HF HRV power between exposure to alcohol versus soft drink advertisement (Z = −1.56, N.S) blocks. HF absolute power measurements during exposure to an alcohol advertisement were available for 71 patients. The test-retest reliability for the mean EVHRV HF power across the eight segments between both baseline measurements was .70, indicating acceptable reliability. For the EVHRV HF power analysis, we first performed a RM-ANOVA with ads (alcohol versus soft drink) and condition (baseline, cue exposure) as the two within-subject factors and, counterbalancing order (soft drinks ads presented first versus alcohol ads presented first) as the between subject variable and HF spectral power for the five combined 8-s segments as the dependent, which revealed the critical significant ads × condition interaction (F(1,65) = 13.41, p = 0.001) and an ads × order interaction (F(1,65) = 8.92, p = 0.004). There were no other main effects or interactions. Regarding the order effect, HF power was higher during the alcohol block than the soda block when alcohol ads were presented first, while EVHRV HF power was higher during soft drink than alcohol ad exposure when soft drink ads were presented first. Follow-up Wilcoxon Signed-ranks test for the critical ads × condition interaction revealed a highly significant increase in HF power during the presentation of alcohol cues (Mdn = 100.54) as compared to during (Mdn = 89.05) pre-cue baseline (Z = 2.74, p = 0.006). Although soft drink cues decreased HF power as compared to baseline, this decrease was not significant (see Fig. 1). Using Thayer et al. (2002), we estimated the respiratory frequency during the EVHRV segments to be in between 0.23 and 0.24 Hz; hence, respiration could not have significantly affected our HF power measurements.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The results indicated that the presence of alcohol cues such as the portrayal of the drug and drinking behaviour induced physiological cue reactivity and craving.Additionally, cue reactivity and craving were positively correlated, and cue reactivity was larger for patients with shorter histories of alcohol dependence.It is concluded that the presence of alcohol cues such as portrayal of alcoholic beverages and drinking behaviour induces cue reactivity and craving in alcohol dependence through a conditioned appetitive response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Humanities, Leiden University Center for Linguistics, Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands, witteman.j@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The present study investigated the nature of physiological cue reactivity and craving in response to alcohol cues among alcohol-dependent patients (N = 80) who were enrolled in detoxification treatment. Further, the predictive value with regard to future drinking of both the magnitude of the physiological and craving response to alcohol cues while in treatment and the degree of alcohol-cue exposure in patients' natural environment was assessed. Physiological reactivity and craving in response to experimental exposure to alcohol and soft drink advertisements were measured during detoxification treatment using heart rate variability and subjective rating of craving. Following discharge, patients monitored exposure to alcohol advertisements for five consecutive weeks with a diary and were followed up with an assessment of relapse at 5 weeks and 3 months post-discharge. The results indicated that the presence of alcohol cues such as the portrayal of the drug and drinking behaviour induced physiological cue reactivity and craving. Additionally, cue reactivity and craving were positively correlated, and cue reactivity was larger for patients with shorter histories of alcohol dependence. Further, patients reported a substantial daily exposure to alcohol cues. The magnitude of cue reactivity and the craving response to alcohol cues at baseline and degree of exposure to alcohol cues in patients' natural environment did not predict relapse. It is concluded that the presence of alcohol cues such as portrayal of alcoholic beverages and drinking behaviour induces cue reactivity and craving in alcohol dependence through a conditioned appetitive response.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus