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Preoperative C-Reactive Protein/Albumin Ratio Predicts Prognosis of Patients after Curative Resection for Gastric Cancer.

Liu X, Sun X, Liu J, Kong P, Chen S, Zhan Y, Xu D - Transl Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: An elevated preoperative C-reactive protein/albumin (CRP/Alb) ratio has been reported to be associated with a poor prognosis for hepatocellular carcinoma.However, several other systemic inflammation-based prognostic scores (neutrophil lymphocyte ratio, platelet lymphocyte ratio and systemic immune-inflammation index, Glasgow Prognostic Score, modified Glasgow prognostic score, and high-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score) were not.In addition, the CRP/Alb ratio had a higher area under the curve value (0.625) compared with several other systemic inflammation-based prognostic scores (P < .001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China; Department of Gastric and Pancreatic Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: liuxch@sysucc.org.cn.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall survival based on the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio. Overall survival based on the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio in patients with stage I to III (A), stage I (B), stage II (C), and stage III (D) GC, respectively.
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f0005: Overall survival based on the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio. Overall survival based on the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio in patients with stage I to III (A), stage I (B), stage II (C), and stage III (D) GC, respectively.

Mentions: Based on previous studies, the accepted optimal cutoff value was determined for some variables, including preoperative body weight loss, BMI, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet counts [16,17,21,22]. Besides the variables, ROC curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cutoff value for others. All the optimal cutoff values for variables were shown in Table 1. The optimal cutoff value for the CRP/Alb ratio was 0.025 for the OS. The sensitivity and specificity were 76.8% and 48.1%, respectively. According to the cutoff level, patients were divided into two groups (≤ 0.025, n = 153; > 0.025, n = 402). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rates in patients with a CRP/Alb ratio ≤ 0.025 were 88.3%, 60.7%, and 54.5%, respectively. The survival rates were significantly higher than those in patients with a CRP/Alb ratio > 0.025, which were 76.9%, 32.6%, and 26.9%, respectively (P < .001; Figure 1A). In addition, when stratified by TNM stage, the prognostic significance of CRP/Alb ratio was still maintained in stage I to III (P = .009, P = .020, and P < .001, respectively; Figure 1, B–D). A low CRP/Alb ratio was associated with longer median OS in stage I (72.0 vs 59.6 months), stage II (62.9 vs 47.9 months), and stage III (38.6 vs 26.4 months), respectively.


Preoperative C-Reactive Protein/Albumin Ratio Predicts Prognosis of Patients after Curative Resection for Gastric Cancer.

Liu X, Sun X, Liu J, Kong P, Chen S, Zhan Y, Xu D - Transl Oncol (2015)

Overall survival based on the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio. Overall survival based on the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio in patients with stage I to III (A), stage I (B), stage II (C), and stage III (D) GC, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562973&req=5

f0005: Overall survival based on the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio. Overall survival based on the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio in patients with stage I to III (A), stage I (B), stage II (C), and stage III (D) GC, respectively.
Mentions: Based on previous studies, the accepted optimal cutoff value was determined for some variables, including preoperative body weight loss, BMI, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet counts [16,17,21,22]. Besides the variables, ROC curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cutoff value for others. All the optimal cutoff values for variables were shown in Table 1. The optimal cutoff value for the CRP/Alb ratio was 0.025 for the OS. The sensitivity and specificity were 76.8% and 48.1%, respectively. According to the cutoff level, patients were divided into two groups (≤ 0.025, n = 153; > 0.025, n = 402). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rates in patients with a CRP/Alb ratio ≤ 0.025 were 88.3%, 60.7%, and 54.5%, respectively. The survival rates were significantly higher than those in patients with a CRP/Alb ratio > 0.025, which were 76.9%, 32.6%, and 26.9%, respectively (P < .001; Figure 1A). In addition, when stratified by TNM stage, the prognostic significance of CRP/Alb ratio was still maintained in stage I to III (P = .009, P = .020, and P < .001, respectively; Figure 1, B–D). A low CRP/Alb ratio was associated with longer median OS in stage I (72.0 vs 59.6 months), stage II (62.9 vs 47.9 months), and stage III (38.6 vs 26.4 months), respectively.

Bottom Line: An elevated preoperative C-reactive protein/albumin (CRP/Alb) ratio has been reported to be associated with a poor prognosis for hepatocellular carcinoma.However, several other systemic inflammation-based prognostic scores (neutrophil lymphocyte ratio, platelet lymphocyte ratio and systemic immune-inflammation index, Glasgow Prognostic Score, modified Glasgow prognostic score, and high-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score) were not.In addition, the CRP/Alb ratio had a higher area under the curve value (0.625) compared with several other systemic inflammation-based prognostic scores (P < .001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China; Department of Gastric and Pancreatic Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: liuxch@sysucc.org.cn.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus