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Contrasting Roles for Orbitofrontal Cortex and Amygdala in Credit Assignment and Learning in Macaques.

Chau BK, Sallet J, Papageorgiou GK, Noonan MP, Bell AH, Walton ME, Rushworth MF - Neuron (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent studies have challenged the view that orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and amygdala mediate flexible reward-guided behavior.A second experiment confirmed the existence of signals for adaptive stay/shift behavior in lOFC and reflecting irrelevant reward in the amygdala in a probabilistic learning task.Our data demonstrate that OFC and amygdala each make unique contributions to flexible behavior and credit assignment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, OX1 3UD, Oxford, UK; Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong. Electronic address: boltonchau@gmail.com.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Previous Reward Signals in the lOFC, ACC, and Amygdala(A) The lOFC did not carry signals related to whether or not a reward had been delivered on the previous trial at the time of the outcome phase on the subsequent trial.(B) The amygdala encoded the reward of the previous trial at the time of the decision and outcome phases of the current trial.
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fig6: Previous Reward Signals in the lOFC, ACC, and Amygdala(A) The lOFC did not carry signals related to whether or not a reward had been delivered on the previous trial at the time of the outcome phase on the subsequent trial.(B) The amygdala encoded the reward of the previous trial at the time of the decision and outcome phases of the current trial.

Mentions: Whether or not reward had been received on a previous trial did not influence decision and outcome-related activity on subsequent trials in lOFC (t3 = 0.849, p = 0.458; Figure 6A). In contrast, the amygdala carried a previous reward signal throughout the course of the subsequent trial’s decision and outcome phases (t3 = 5.552, p = 0.012; Figure 6B), suggesting that the amygdala might mediate the assignment of the reward from a previous trial to an option chosen on the current trial and hence mediate a spread of reward effect. In a PPI analysis in which we examined the interacting influences of lOFC activity and the previous trial’s reward on amygdala activity, we found negative lOFC-amygdala coupling as a function of previous reward delivery (t3 = −7.207, p = 0.006; Figure 7A). In other words, the lOFC-amygdala connectivity was weaker when the amygdala itself was showing a signal related to reward delivery on the previous trial.


Contrasting Roles for Orbitofrontal Cortex and Amygdala in Credit Assignment and Learning in Macaques.

Chau BK, Sallet J, Papageorgiou GK, Noonan MP, Bell AH, Walton ME, Rushworth MF - Neuron (2015)

Previous Reward Signals in the lOFC, ACC, and Amygdala(A) The lOFC did not carry signals related to whether or not a reward had been delivered on the previous trial at the time of the outcome phase on the subsequent trial.(B) The amygdala encoded the reward of the previous trial at the time of the decision and outcome phases of the current trial.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562909&req=5

fig6: Previous Reward Signals in the lOFC, ACC, and Amygdala(A) The lOFC did not carry signals related to whether or not a reward had been delivered on the previous trial at the time of the outcome phase on the subsequent trial.(B) The amygdala encoded the reward of the previous trial at the time of the decision and outcome phases of the current trial.
Mentions: Whether or not reward had been received on a previous trial did not influence decision and outcome-related activity on subsequent trials in lOFC (t3 = 0.849, p = 0.458; Figure 6A). In contrast, the amygdala carried a previous reward signal throughout the course of the subsequent trial’s decision and outcome phases (t3 = 5.552, p = 0.012; Figure 6B), suggesting that the amygdala might mediate the assignment of the reward from a previous trial to an option chosen on the current trial and hence mediate a spread of reward effect. In a PPI analysis in which we examined the interacting influences of lOFC activity and the previous trial’s reward on amygdala activity, we found negative lOFC-amygdala coupling as a function of previous reward delivery (t3 = −7.207, p = 0.006; Figure 7A). In other words, the lOFC-amygdala connectivity was weaker when the amygdala itself was showing a signal related to reward delivery on the previous trial.

Bottom Line: Recent studies have challenged the view that orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and amygdala mediate flexible reward-guided behavior.A second experiment confirmed the existence of signals for adaptive stay/shift behavior in lOFC and reflecting irrelevant reward in the amygdala in a probabilistic learning task.Our data demonstrate that OFC and amygdala each make unique contributions to flexible behavior and credit assignment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, OX1 3UD, Oxford, UK; Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong. Electronic address: boltonchau@gmail.com.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus