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Contrasting Roles for Orbitofrontal Cortex and Amygdala in Credit Assignment and Learning in Macaques.

Chau BK, Sallet J, Papageorgiou GK, Noonan MP, Bell AH, Walton ME, Rushworth MF - Neuron (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent studies have challenged the view that orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and amygdala mediate flexible reward-guided behavior.A second experiment confirmed the existence of signals for adaptive stay/shift behavior in lOFC and reflecting irrelevant reward in the amygdala in a probabilistic learning task.Our data demonstrate that OFC and amygdala each make unique contributions to flexible behavior and credit assignment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, OX1 3UD, Oxford, UK; Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong. Electronic address: boltonchau@gmail.com.

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Lose-Shift Signal in the Amygdala(A) The amygdala ROI (14, −3, −13; red) in sagittal view (top panel) and coronal view (bottom panel) for BOLD activity extraction.(B) There was no clear WSLS (green) signal in the amygdala.
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fig3: Lose-Shift Signal in the Amygdala(A) The amygdala ROI (14, −3, −13; red) in sagittal view (top panel) and coronal view (bottom panel) for BOLD activity extraction.(B) There was no clear WSLS (green) signal in the amygdala.

Mentions: We placed an ROI over basolateral and lateral nuclei of the amygdala (14, −3, −13; Figure 3A), the region investigated in previous studies (Morrison et al., 2011; Paton et al., 2006; Saddoris et al., 2005). Three out of four monkeys carried a positive WSLS signal at the outcome phase that was similar to one seen in lOFC, although the group average effect across the four monkeys was not significant (t3 = 1.106, p = 0.350; Figure 3B).


Contrasting Roles for Orbitofrontal Cortex and Amygdala in Credit Assignment and Learning in Macaques.

Chau BK, Sallet J, Papageorgiou GK, Noonan MP, Bell AH, Walton ME, Rushworth MF - Neuron (2015)

Lose-Shift Signal in the Amygdala(A) The amygdala ROI (14, −3, −13; red) in sagittal view (top panel) and coronal view (bottom panel) for BOLD activity extraction.(B) There was no clear WSLS (green) signal in the amygdala.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562909&req=5

fig3: Lose-Shift Signal in the Amygdala(A) The amygdala ROI (14, −3, −13; red) in sagittal view (top panel) and coronal view (bottom panel) for BOLD activity extraction.(B) There was no clear WSLS (green) signal in the amygdala.
Mentions: We placed an ROI over basolateral and lateral nuclei of the amygdala (14, −3, −13; Figure 3A), the region investigated in previous studies (Morrison et al., 2011; Paton et al., 2006; Saddoris et al., 2005). Three out of four monkeys carried a positive WSLS signal at the outcome phase that was similar to one seen in lOFC, although the group average effect across the four monkeys was not significant (t3 = 1.106, p = 0.350; Figure 3B).

Bottom Line: Recent studies have challenged the view that orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and amygdala mediate flexible reward-guided behavior.A second experiment confirmed the existence of signals for adaptive stay/shift behavior in lOFC and reflecting irrelevant reward in the amygdala in a probabilistic learning task.Our data demonstrate that OFC and amygdala each make unique contributions to flexible behavior and credit assignment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, OX1 3UD, Oxford, UK; Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong. Electronic address: boltonchau@gmail.com.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus