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Clinical and Endoscopic Features of Metastatic Tumors in the Stomach.

Kim GH, Ahn JY, Jung HY, Park YS, Kim MJ, Choi KD, Lee JH, Choi KS, Kim do H, Lim H, Song HJ, Lee GH, Kim JH - Gut Liver (2015)

Bottom Line: Twelve patients received treatments after the diagnosis of gastric metastasis.The median survival period from the diagnosis of gastric metastasis was 3.0 months (interquartile range, 1.0 to 11.0 months).Patients with solitary lesions and patients who received any treatments survived longer after the diagnosis of metastatic cancer than patients with multiple lesions and patients who did not any receive any treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, and Asan Digestive Disease Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Metastasis to the stomach is rare. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the clinical outcomes of cancers that metastasized to the stomach.

Methods: We reviewed the clinicopathological aspects of patients with gastric metastases from solid organ tumors. Thirty-seven cases were identified, and we evaluated the histology, initial presentation, imaging findings, lesion locations, treatment courses, and overall patient survival.

Results: Endoscopic findings indicated that solitary lesions presented more frequently than multiple lesions and submucosal tumor-like tumors were the most common appearance. Malignant melanoma was the tumor that most frequently metastasized to the stomach. Twelve patients received treatments after the diagnosis of gastric metastasis. The median survival period from the diagnosis of gastric metastasis was 3.0 months (interquartile range, 1.0 to 11.0 months). Patients with solitary lesions and patients who received any treatments survived longer after the diagnosis of metastatic cancer than patients with multiple lesions and patients who did not any receive any treatments.

Conclusions: Proper treatment with careful consideration of the primary tumor characteristics can increase the survival period in patients with tumors that metastasize to the stomach, especially in cases with solitary metastatic lesions in endoscopic findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Endoscopic appearance of metastatic tumors in the stomach. (A) Resembling submucosal tumors due to bladder cancer. (B) Resembling early primary gastric cancer due to lung adenocarcinoma. (C-F) Resembling advanced gastric cancer: (C) Type 1, due to renal cell carcinoma; (D) Type 2, due to choriocarcinoma; (E) Type 3, due to pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma; (F) Type 4, due to ovarian cancer.
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f1-gnl-09-615: Endoscopic appearance of metastatic tumors in the stomach. (A) Resembling submucosal tumors due to bladder cancer. (B) Resembling early primary gastric cancer due to lung adenocarcinoma. (C-F) Resembling advanced gastric cancer: (C) Type 1, due to renal cell carcinoma; (D) Type 2, due to choriocarcinoma; (E) Type 3, due to pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma; (F) Type 4, due to ovarian cancer.

Mentions: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was used for the diagnosis, and all the lesions were confirmed using endoscopic biopsy followed by histological analysis. Collected data included epidemiological characteristics, symptomatology, indications for endoscopic investigation, macroscopic presentation, time between primary tumor diagnosis and the detection of gastric metastasis, and treatment. Endoscopic procedures were performed using a single-channel endoscope (GIF-H260; Olympus Optical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Using standard biopsy forceps, biopsies were obtained from suspected lesions under direct-vision endoscopy. Two endoscopists (J.Y.A. and H.Y.J.) reviewed the endoscopic findings and categorized the gross findings into two main patterns: resembling submucosal tumor or resembling primary gastric cancer. Those resembling primary gastric cancer were subdivided into two groups: resembling early gastric cancer and resembling advanced gastric cancer (Fig. 1). Those resembling advanced gastric cancer were further subdivided into four types. Type 1 is a polypoid tumor. Type 2 is an ulcerated tumor with sharply demarcated margins. Type 3 is an ulcerated tumor without definite borders. Type 4 is diffusely infiltrating tumor.


Clinical and Endoscopic Features of Metastatic Tumors in the Stomach.

Kim GH, Ahn JY, Jung HY, Park YS, Kim MJ, Choi KD, Lee JH, Choi KS, Kim do H, Lim H, Song HJ, Lee GH, Kim JH - Gut Liver (2015)

Endoscopic appearance of metastatic tumors in the stomach. (A) Resembling submucosal tumors due to bladder cancer. (B) Resembling early primary gastric cancer due to lung adenocarcinoma. (C-F) Resembling advanced gastric cancer: (C) Type 1, due to renal cell carcinoma; (D) Type 2, due to choriocarcinoma; (E) Type 3, due to pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma; (F) Type 4, due to ovarian cancer.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562778&req=5

f1-gnl-09-615: Endoscopic appearance of metastatic tumors in the stomach. (A) Resembling submucosal tumors due to bladder cancer. (B) Resembling early primary gastric cancer due to lung adenocarcinoma. (C-F) Resembling advanced gastric cancer: (C) Type 1, due to renal cell carcinoma; (D) Type 2, due to choriocarcinoma; (E) Type 3, due to pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma; (F) Type 4, due to ovarian cancer.
Mentions: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was used for the diagnosis, and all the lesions were confirmed using endoscopic biopsy followed by histological analysis. Collected data included epidemiological characteristics, symptomatology, indications for endoscopic investigation, macroscopic presentation, time between primary tumor diagnosis and the detection of gastric metastasis, and treatment. Endoscopic procedures were performed using a single-channel endoscope (GIF-H260; Olympus Optical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Using standard biopsy forceps, biopsies were obtained from suspected lesions under direct-vision endoscopy. Two endoscopists (J.Y.A. and H.Y.J.) reviewed the endoscopic findings and categorized the gross findings into two main patterns: resembling submucosal tumor or resembling primary gastric cancer. Those resembling primary gastric cancer were subdivided into two groups: resembling early gastric cancer and resembling advanced gastric cancer (Fig. 1). Those resembling advanced gastric cancer were further subdivided into four types. Type 1 is a polypoid tumor. Type 2 is an ulcerated tumor with sharply demarcated margins. Type 3 is an ulcerated tumor without definite borders. Type 4 is diffusely infiltrating tumor.

Bottom Line: Twelve patients received treatments after the diagnosis of gastric metastasis.The median survival period from the diagnosis of gastric metastasis was 3.0 months (interquartile range, 1.0 to 11.0 months).Patients with solitary lesions and patients who received any treatments survived longer after the diagnosis of metastatic cancer than patients with multiple lesions and patients who did not any receive any treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, and Asan Digestive Disease Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Metastasis to the stomach is rare. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the clinical outcomes of cancers that metastasized to the stomach.

Methods: We reviewed the clinicopathological aspects of patients with gastric metastases from solid organ tumors. Thirty-seven cases were identified, and we evaluated the histology, initial presentation, imaging findings, lesion locations, treatment courses, and overall patient survival.

Results: Endoscopic findings indicated that solitary lesions presented more frequently than multiple lesions and submucosal tumor-like tumors were the most common appearance. Malignant melanoma was the tumor that most frequently metastasized to the stomach. Twelve patients received treatments after the diagnosis of gastric metastasis. The median survival period from the diagnosis of gastric metastasis was 3.0 months (interquartile range, 1.0 to 11.0 months). Patients with solitary lesions and patients who received any treatments survived longer after the diagnosis of metastatic cancer than patients with multiple lesions and patients who did not any receive any treatments.

Conclusions: Proper treatment with careful consideration of the primary tumor characteristics can increase the survival period in patients with tumors that metastasize to the stomach, especially in cases with solitary metastatic lesions in endoscopic findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus