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Dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to risk of prostate cancer.

Wang RJ, Tang JE, Chen Y, Gao JG - Onco Targets Ther (2015)

Bottom Line: A random effects model was used to calculate the summary relative risks (RRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Twenty-seven epidemiological studies (18 case-control studies and nine cohort studies) were included in the final analysis.There was no evidence of significant publication bias based on the Begg's test and Egger's test.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationships between dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and prostate cancer risk are unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate these associations.

Methods: Relevant studies were identified by a search of PubMed database and EMBASE database up to April 2015. A random effects model was used to calculate the summary relative risks (RRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results: Twenty-seven epidemiological studies (18 case-control studies and nine cohort studies) were included in the final analysis. The pooled RRs of prostate cancer were 0.94 (95% CI 0.85-1.05, P=0.285), 1.13 (95% CI 0.98-1.30, P=0.095), 0.96 (95% CI 0.81-1.14, P=0.672), 1.06 (95% CI 0.96-1.18, P=0.254), and 1.04 (95% CI 0.91-1.18, P=0.590) for dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, GI, and GL, respectively. There was no evidence of significant publication bias based on the Begg's test and Egger's test.

Conclusion: The findings of this meta-analysis indicate that, based on available information, dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, GI, and GL are not associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary RR of carbohydrate intake and prostate cancer risk.Note: Weights are from random effects analysis.Abbreviations: RR, relative risk; CI, confidence interval.
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f4-ott-8-2415: Summary RR of carbohydrate intake and prostate cancer risk.Note: Weights are from random effects analysis.Abbreviations: RR, relative risk; CI, confidence interval.

Mentions: The pooled RRs of prostate cancer were 0.94 (95% CI 0.85–1.05, P=0.285), 1.13 (95% CI 0.98–1.30, P=0.095), 0.96 (95% CI 0.81–1.14, P=0.672), 1.06 (95% CI 0.96–1.18, P=0.254), and 1.04 (95% CI 0.91–1.18, P=0.590) for dietary fiber (Figure 2), whole grains (Figure 3), carbohydrate (Figure 4), GI (Figure 5A), and GL (Figure 5B), respectively.


Dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to risk of prostate cancer.

Wang RJ, Tang JE, Chen Y, Gao JG - Onco Targets Ther (2015)

Summary RR of carbohydrate intake and prostate cancer risk.Note: Weights are from random effects analysis.Abbreviations: RR, relative risk; CI, confidence interval.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562756&req=5

f4-ott-8-2415: Summary RR of carbohydrate intake and prostate cancer risk.Note: Weights are from random effects analysis.Abbreviations: RR, relative risk; CI, confidence interval.
Mentions: The pooled RRs of prostate cancer were 0.94 (95% CI 0.85–1.05, P=0.285), 1.13 (95% CI 0.98–1.30, P=0.095), 0.96 (95% CI 0.81–1.14, P=0.672), 1.06 (95% CI 0.96–1.18, P=0.254), and 1.04 (95% CI 0.91–1.18, P=0.590) for dietary fiber (Figure 2), whole grains (Figure 3), carbohydrate (Figure 4), GI (Figure 5A), and GL (Figure 5B), respectively.

Bottom Line: A random effects model was used to calculate the summary relative risks (RRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Twenty-seven epidemiological studies (18 case-control studies and nine cohort studies) were included in the final analysis.There was no evidence of significant publication bias based on the Begg's test and Egger's test.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationships between dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and prostate cancer risk are unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate these associations.

Methods: Relevant studies were identified by a search of PubMed database and EMBASE database up to April 2015. A random effects model was used to calculate the summary relative risks (RRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results: Twenty-seven epidemiological studies (18 case-control studies and nine cohort studies) were included in the final analysis. The pooled RRs of prostate cancer were 0.94 (95% CI 0.85-1.05, P=0.285), 1.13 (95% CI 0.98-1.30, P=0.095), 0.96 (95% CI 0.81-1.14, P=0.672), 1.06 (95% CI 0.96-1.18, P=0.254), and 1.04 (95% CI 0.91-1.18, P=0.590) for dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, GI, and GL, respectively. There was no evidence of significant publication bias based on the Begg's test and Egger's test.

Conclusion: The findings of this meta-analysis indicate that, based on available information, dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, GI, and GL are not associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus