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Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells.

Andrzejewska A, Nowakowski A, Janowski M, Bulte JW, Gilad AA, Walczak P, Lukomska B - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest.Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells.Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The summary of pre- and postmortem labeling and identification techniques described in detail in text.Note: Reproduced with permission from © I-Hsun Wu 2014.Abbreviations: PET, positron emission tomography; BLI, bioluminescent imaging; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; HSV1-TK, herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase; LRP, lysine-rich protein; MR, magnetic resonance; EdU, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine; FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization; GFP, green fluorescent protein; DAPI, 4′6-diamidino-2-phenylindole; BrdU, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine.
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f5-ijn-10-5543: The summary of pre- and postmortem labeling and identification techniques described in detail in text.Note: Reproduced with permission from © I-Hsun Wu 2014.Abbreviations: PET, positron emission tomography; BLI, bioluminescent imaging; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; HSV1-TK, herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase; LRP, lysine-rich protein; MR, magnetic resonance; EdU, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine; FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization; GFP, green fluorescent protein; DAPI, 4′6-diamidino-2-phenylindole; BrdU, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine.

Mentions: Cell therapy is a rapidly growing field of medicine. Cell imaging dramatically increases our understanding of the therapeutic effects. There are a variety of options to visualize transplanted cells, with a major division into premortem (in vivo) and postmortem (ex vivo) techniques (Figure 5). Noninvasive, premortem techniques that permit evaluation of the efficiency of transplantation and the migration of transplanted cells are essential for animal model studies and human clinical therapeutic approaches. Postmortem techniques allow to see the transplanted cells within the context of surrounding tissue in detail due to the possibility of imaging at high magnification. Driven by the urgent need, there has been continuous progress in cell labeling approaches, which we have presented in our review. This progress includes novel nucleotide analogs for postmortem stem cell identification, such as EdU; novel MRI reporter genes, such as MagA; novel MR contrast techniques, such as CEST; as well as entirely novel methods such as optoacoustic imaging. The breadth of options allows for fitting the cell labeling and detection methods to the specific needs of particular applications on the preclinical and clinical level, which will allow for a more comprehensive application of regenerative medicine.


Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells.

Andrzejewska A, Nowakowski A, Janowski M, Bulte JW, Gilad AA, Walczak P, Lukomska B - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

The summary of pre- and postmortem labeling and identification techniques described in detail in text.Note: Reproduced with permission from © I-Hsun Wu 2014.Abbreviations: PET, positron emission tomography; BLI, bioluminescent imaging; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; HSV1-TK, herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase; LRP, lysine-rich protein; MR, magnetic resonance; EdU, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine; FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization; GFP, green fluorescent protein; DAPI, 4′6-diamidino-2-phenylindole; BrdU, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562754&req=5

f5-ijn-10-5543: The summary of pre- and postmortem labeling and identification techniques described in detail in text.Note: Reproduced with permission from © I-Hsun Wu 2014.Abbreviations: PET, positron emission tomography; BLI, bioluminescent imaging; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; HSV1-TK, herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase; LRP, lysine-rich protein; MR, magnetic resonance; EdU, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine; FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization; GFP, green fluorescent protein; DAPI, 4′6-diamidino-2-phenylindole; BrdU, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine.
Mentions: Cell therapy is a rapidly growing field of medicine. Cell imaging dramatically increases our understanding of the therapeutic effects. There are a variety of options to visualize transplanted cells, with a major division into premortem (in vivo) and postmortem (ex vivo) techniques (Figure 5). Noninvasive, premortem techniques that permit evaluation of the efficiency of transplantation and the migration of transplanted cells are essential for animal model studies and human clinical therapeutic approaches. Postmortem techniques allow to see the transplanted cells within the context of surrounding tissue in detail due to the possibility of imaging at high magnification. Driven by the urgent need, there has been continuous progress in cell labeling approaches, which we have presented in our review. This progress includes novel nucleotide analogs for postmortem stem cell identification, such as EdU; novel MRI reporter genes, such as MagA; novel MR contrast techniques, such as CEST; as well as entirely novel methods such as optoacoustic imaging. The breadth of options allows for fitting the cell labeling and detection methods to the specific needs of particular applications on the preclinical and clinical level, which will allow for a more comprehensive application of regenerative medicine.

Bottom Line: Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest.Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells.Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus