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Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells.

Andrzejewska A, Nowakowski A, Janowski M, Bulte JW, Gilad AA, Walczak P, Lukomska B - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest.Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells.Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Depiction of the mechanism of optoacoustic imaging.Note: Copyright © 2015. Reproduced with permission from iThera Medical, (http://www.ithera-medical.com/technology/msot-principle.html).114
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f4-ijn-10-5543: Depiction of the mechanism of optoacoustic imaging.Note: Copyright © 2015. Reproduced with permission from iThera Medical, (http://www.ithera-medical.com/technology/msot-principle.html).114

Mentions: Optoacoustic imaging is based on the phenomenon of a transverse wave of light (photons generated by a short laser pulse or less expensive high-power LED [light-emitting diode]) hitting specific molecules and causing their transient thermal expansion, which, in turn, generates an acoustic wave sensed by external detectors, such as microphones or piezoelectric tools (Figure 4).110 Thus, the stimulation is the same as for fluorescent imaging, but the detected signal is based on an acoustic wave, which can be a huge advantage. In fluorescent imaging, the energy of photons generated by a fluorescent lamp or a laser is sufficient for relatively deep penetration to tissues, and the limiting factor is the energy of reflected photons, which is insufficient to reach detectors. In optoacoustic imaging, this limitation is overcome by the detection of an acoustic wave, which has dramatically better penetration of tissues. The lack of tissue autofluorescence is an additional advantage of optoacoustic technology. While fluorescence provides a scattering contrast, optoacoustic technology provides an absorption contrast.111,112 Several systems have been developed for optoacoustic imaging. Portable, hand-held imaging probes can reach 1.5 cm in depth at a speed of 10 volumetric frames per second and a spatial resolution of 200 µm.113 Photoacoustic microscopy provides high-resolution images of tissue slices, can be combined with multiphoton microscopy, and can also be used for in vivo photoacoustic imaging.115 The recent development of optoacoustic devices with tomographic capabilities, based on multispectral immixing (multispectral optoacoustic tomography – MSOT), has fueled even more interest in this imaging modality.116–118 This was made possible because of the relatively high yield of the acoustic signal. An MSOT device has just come on the market (http://www.ithera-medical.com).


Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells.

Andrzejewska A, Nowakowski A, Janowski M, Bulte JW, Gilad AA, Walczak P, Lukomska B - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Depiction of the mechanism of optoacoustic imaging.Note: Copyright © 2015. Reproduced with permission from iThera Medical, (http://www.ithera-medical.com/technology/msot-principle.html).114
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562754&req=5

f4-ijn-10-5543: Depiction of the mechanism of optoacoustic imaging.Note: Copyright © 2015. Reproduced with permission from iThera Medical, (http://www.ithera-medical.com/technology/msot-principle.html).114
Mentions: Optoacoustic imaging is based on the phenomenon of a transverse wave of light (photons generated by a short laser pulse or less expensive high-power LED [light-emitting diode]) hitting specific molecules and causing their transient thermal expansion, which, in turn, generates an acoustic wave sensed by external detectors, such as microphones or piezoelectric tools (Figure 4).110 Thus, the stimulation is the same as for fluorescent imaging, but the detected signal is based on an acoustic wave, which can be a huge advantage. In fluorescent imaging, the energy of photons generated by a fluorescent lamp or a laser is sufficient for relatively deep penetration to tissues, and the limiting factor is the energy of reflected photons, which is insufficient to reach detectors. In optoacoustic imaging, this limitation is overcome by the detection of an acoustic wave, which has dramatically better penetration of tissues. The lack of tissue autofluorescence is an additional advantage of optoacoustic technology. While fluorescence provides a scattering contrast, optoacoustic technology provides an absorption contrast.111,112 Several systems have been developed for optoacoustic imaging. Portable, hand-held imaging probes can reach 1.5 cm in depth at a speed of 10 volumetric frames per second and a spatial resolution of 200 µm.113 Photoacoustic microscopy provides high-resolution images of tissue slices, can be combined with multiphoton microscopy, and can also be used for in vivo photoacoustic imaging.115 The recent development of optoacoustic devices with tomographic capabilities, based on multispectral immixing (multispectral optoacoustic tomography – MSOT), has fueled even more interest in this imaging modality.116–118 This was made possible because of the relatively high yield of the acoustic signal. An MSOT device has just come on the market (http://www.ithera-medical.com).

Bottom Line: Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest.Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells.Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus