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Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications.

Saifullah B, Hussein MZ - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science.These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery.The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic representation of the brucite structure.Notes: (A) Side and (B) top view of the layer. Reprinted from Arizaga GG, Satyanarayana KG, Wypych F. Layered hydroxide salts: synthesis, properties and potential applications. Solid State Ionics. 2007;178:1143–1162, Copyright 2007, with permission from Elsevier.11
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f2-ijn-10-5609: Schematic representation of the brucite structure.Notes: (A) Side and (B) top view of the layer. Reprinted from Arizaga GG, Satyanarayana KG, Wypych F. Layered hydroxide salts: synthesis, properties and potential applications. Solid State Ionics. 2007;178:1143–1162, Copyright 2007, with permission from Elsevier.11

Mentions: In layered magnesium hydroxide (brucite) [Mg(OH)6], the divalent M2+ ions are octahedrally surrounded by hydroxide ions. These octahedral units of magnesium hydroxides share their edges and form infinite layers in which O–H forms the bond perpendicularly to the layers. In these layers, hydroxyl anions are arranged in a closed-packed manner with triangular symmetry in two-dimensional (2-D) planes. The octahedral holes of the O–H alternate planes are occupied by Mg2+ ions, accounting for the triangular lattice similar to the one occupied by O–H ions, resulting in neutral layer.10–14 The structure of brucite is shown in Figure 2.


Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications.

Saifullah B, Hussein MZ - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Schematic representation of the brucite structure.Notes: (A) Side and (B) top view of the layer. Reprinted from Arizaga GG, Satyanarayana KG, Wypych F. Layered hydroxide salts: synthesis, properties and potential applications. Solid State Ionics. 2007;178:1143–1162, Copyright 2007, with permission from Elsevier.11
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562743&req=5

f2-ijn-10-5609: Schematic representation of the brucite structure.Notes: (A) Side and (B) top view of the layer. Reprinted from Arizaga GG, Satyanarayana KG, Wypych F. Layered hydroxide salts: synthesis, properties and potential applications. Solid State Ionics. 2007;178:1143–1162, Copyright 2007, with permission from Elsevier.11
Mentions: In layered magnesium hydroxide (brucite) [Mg(OH)6], the divalent M2+ ions are octahedrally surrounded by hydroxide ions. These octahedral units of magnesium hydroxides share their edges and form infinite layers in which O–H forms the bond perpendicularly to the layers. In these layers, hydroxyl anions are arranged in a closed-packed manner with triangular symmetry in two-dimensional (2-D) planes. The octahedral holes of the O–H alternate planes are occupied by Mg2+ ions, accounting for the triangular lattice similar to the one occupied by O–H ions, resulting in neutral layer.10–14 The structure of brucite is shown in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science.These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery.The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging.

No MeSH data available.