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Serum vitamin D status in children with protein-energy malnutrition admitted to a national referral hospital in Uganda.

Nabeta HW, Kasolo J, Kiggundu RK, Kiragga AN, Kiguli S - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Bottom Line: Children with protein energy malnutrition were categorized based on anthropometric measurements of weight-for-height and weight for length compared with the recommended WHO reference Z-score.Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium and phosphate were assayed.Clinicians should actively screen for children for serum vitamin D levels regardless of nutritional status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. hwnabeta@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Vitamin D deficiency is a world-wide epidemic with recent estimates indicating that greater than 50% of the global population is at risk. In Uganda, 80% of healthy community children in a survey were found to be vitamin D insufficient. Protein-energy malnutrition is likely to be associated with vitamin D intake deficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and the associated factors among children admitted with protein-energy malnutrition to the pediatrics wards of Mulago hospital in Kampala, Uganda.

Methods: Consecutive sampling was done with 158 children, aged 6-24 months, enrolled in a cross sectional study. One hundred and seventeen malnourished and 41 non malnourished children were enrolled from the Acute Care unit, pediatrics in-patient wards, outpatient and immunization clinics, following informed consent obtained from the children's parents/guardians. Children with protein energy malnutrition were categorized based on anthropometric measurements of weight-for-height and weight for length compared with the recommended WHO reference Z-score. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium and phosphate were assayed.

Results: One hundred seventeen malnourished and 41 non malnourished children were enrolled. The majority of study participants were male, 91 (57.6%). The mean serum vitamin D levels among the malnourished was 32.5 mmol/L (±12.0 SD) and 32.2 mmol/L (10.9 SD) among the malnourished, p = 0.868. Fifteen (36.6%) of the non malnourished children and 51 (43.6%) of the malnourished had suboptimal levels, p = 0.689. Malnourished children admitted with meningitis and cerebral palsy had lower serum vitamin D levels than those with other infections.

Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in vitamin D values between the malnourished and non malnourished children. Clinicians should actively screen for children for serum vitamin D levels regardless of nutritional status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Box plot of the admission diagnoses and vitamin D levels amongst the malnourished children. The median (IQR) serum vitamin D level was 36.5 (IQR 29, 42) ng/mL among children admitted with pneumonia. The mean (SD) was 36.3 ± 11.8 ng/mL. There were three outlier; one child admitted with pneumonia with elevated vitamin D levels of >60 ng/mL, one child admitted with meningitis with levels >40 ng/mL and one with serum vitamin D levels <20 ng/mL
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Fig1: Box plot of the admission diagnoses and vitamin D levels amongst the malnourished children. The median (IQR) serum vitamin D level was 36.5 (IQR 29, 42) ng/mL among children admitted with pneumonia. The mean (SD) was 36.3 ± 11.8 ng/mL. There were three outlier; one child admitted with pneumonia with elevated vitamin D levels of >60 ng/mL, one child admitted with meningitis with levels >40 ng/mL and one with serum vitamin D levels <20 ng/mL

Mentions: Among those admitted with pneumonia, the median (IQR) serum vitamin D levels were 36.5 (IQR 29, 42) ng/mL with a mean (SD) of 36.3 ± 11.8 ng/mL. Children with meningitis had a median (IQR) vitamin levels of 26.0 (24.0, 32.4) ng/mL, cerebral palsy 25.1 (11.5, 31.6) ng/mL, diarrhea 31.1 (25.5, 38.7) ng/mL, measles 32.4 (24.4, 36), septicemia 43.6 (31, 45.5) ng/mL, malaria 30.6 (28, 54.3) ng/mL and sickle cell disease 26.0 (13.7, 41.0) ng/mL. There were three outliers. One child admitted with pneumonia had serum levels >60 ng/mL, one child among those with meningitis had serum levels >40 ng/mL and another had serum vitamin D levels <20 ng/mL, see Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Serum vitamin D status in children with protein-energy malnutrition admitted to a national referral hospital in Uganda.

Nabeta HW, Kasolo J, Kiggundu RK, Kiragga AN, Kiguli S - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Box plot of the admission diagnoses and vitamin D levels amongst the malnourished children. The median (IQR) serum vitamin D level was 36.5 (IQR 29, 42) ng/mL among children admitted with pneumonia. The mean (SD) was 36.3 ± 11.8 ng/mL. There were three outlier; one child admitted with pneumonia with elevated vitamin D levels of >60 ng/mL, one child admitted with meningitis with levels >40 ng/mL and one with serum vitamin D levels <20 ng/mL
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562347&req=5

Fig1: Box plot of the admission diagnoses and vitamin D levels amongst the malnourished children. The median (IQR) serum vitamin D level was 36.5 (IQR 29, 42) ng/mL among children admitted with pneumonia. The mean (SD) was 36.3 ± 11.8 ng/mL. There were three outlier; one child admitted with pneumonia with elevated vitamin D levels of >60 ng/mL, one child admitted with meningitis with levels >40 ng/mL and one with serum vitamin D levels <20 ng/mL
Mentions: Among those admitted with pneumonia, the median (IQR) serum vitamin D levels were 36.5 (IQR 29, 42) ng/mL with a mean (SD) of 36.3 ± 11.8 ng/mL. Children with meningitis had a median (IQR) vitamin levels of 26.0 (24.0, 32.4) ng/mL, cerebral palsy 25.1 (11.5, 31.6) ng/mL, diarrhea 31.1 (25.5, 38.7) ng/mL, measles 32.4 (24.4, 36), septicemia 43.6 (31, 45.5) ng/mL, malaria 30.6 (28, 54.3) ng/mL and sickle cell disease 26.0 (13.7, 41.0) ng/mL. There were three outliers. One child admitted with pneumonia had serum levels >60 ng/mL, one child among those with meningitis had serum levels >40 ng/mL and another had serum vitamin D levels <20 ng/mL, see Fig. 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Children with protein energy malnutrition were categorized based on anthropometric measurements of weight-for-height and weight for length compared with the recommended WHO reference Z-score.Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium and phosphate were assayed.Clinicians should actively screen for children for serum vitamin D levels regardless of nutritional status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. hwnabeta@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Vitamin D deficiency is a world-wide epidemic with recent estimates indicating that greater than 50% of the global population is at risk. In Uganda, 80% of healthy community children in a survey were found to be vitamin D insufficient. Protein-energy malnutrition is likely to be associated with vitamin D intake deficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and the associated factors among children admitted with protein-energy malnutrition to the pediatrics wards of Mulago hospital in Kampala, Uganda.

Methods: Consecutive sampling was done with 158 children, aged 6-24 months, enrolled in a cross sectional study. One hundred and seventeen malnourished and 41 non malnourished children were enrolled from the Acute Care unit, pediatrics in-patient wards, outpatient and immunization clinics, following informed consent obtained from the children's parents/guardians. Children with protein energy malnutrition were categorized based on anthropometric measurements of weight-for-height and weight for length compared with the recommended WHO reference Z-score. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium and phosphate were assayed.

Results: One hundred seventeen malnourished and 41 non malnourished children were enrolled. The majority of study participants were male, 91 (57.6%). The mean serum vitamin D levels among the malnourished was 32.5 mmol/L (±12.0 SD) and 32.2 mmol/L (10.9 SD) among the malnourished, p = 0.868. Fifteen (36.6%) of the non malnourished children and 51 (43.6%) of the malnourished had suboptimal levels, p = 0.689. Malnourished children admitted with meningitis and cerebral palsy had lower serum vitamin D levels than those with other infections.

Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in vitamin D values between the malnourished and non malnourished children. Clinicians should actively screen for children for serum vitamin D levels regardless of nutritional status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus