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Childhood cognitive ability moderates later-life manifestation of type 2 diabetes genetic risk.

Mõttus R, Luciano M, Sarr JM, McCarthy MI, Deary IJ - Health Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: The interaction term was not significant for self-reported diabetes (p = .34), although the genetic risk-diabetes association showed a tendency of being stronger among those with below-median cognitive ability.Higher premorbid cognitive ability may provide some environmental protection against the manifestation of Type 2 diabetes genetic risk.This information may improve early identification of diabetes risk and inform intervention development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The interaction between polygenic risk and childhood cognitive ability in the prediction of HbA1c.
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fig1: The interaction between polygenic risk and childhood cognitive ability in the prediction of HbA1c.

Mentions: The interaction term between childhood cognitive ability and polygenic risk was statistically nonsignificant (p = .34) when predicting self-reported diabetes status, but significant (p = .02) for the prediction of HbA1c. When people were split at median into those with lower and higher childhood cognitive ability (see Figure 1), the risk scores predicted HbA1c levels significantly more strongly in the lower cognitive ability group (β = .21, 95% CI [.11, .31], p < .001) than in the higher ability group (β = .10, 95% CI [.01, .19], p = .04; see also Supplemental Material for an alternative splitting). The nonsignificant interaction in the prediction of self-reported diabetes was in the same direction: the association between genetic risk and diagnosis was stronger in those below median cognitive ability (OR = 1.93, 95% CI [1.38, 2.74], p < .001) than among those with higher ability (OR = 1.64, 95% CI [1.10, 2.49], p < .05). These findings tended to replicate across the alternative risk scores based on fewer SNPs (see Supplemental Material for details). There was little evidence for the association being driven by participants with potential Type 1 diabetes or by the use of hypoglycemic drugs (see Supplementary Material for details). Finally, we found negligible evidence for the role of body mass index (BMI) in polygenic risk-diabetes association or in the polygenic risk-cognitive ability interaction (see Supplemental Material for details).


Childhood cognitive ability moderates later-life manifestation of type 2 diabetes genetic risk.

Mõttus R, Luciano M, Sarr JM, McCarthy MI, Deary IJ - Health Psychol (2015)

The interaction between polygenic risk and childhood cognitive ability in the prediction of HbA1c.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562329&req=5

fig1: The interaction between polygenic risk and childhood cognitive ability in the prediction of HbA1c.
Mentions: The interaction term between childhood cognitive ability and polygenic risk was statistically nonsignificant (p = .34) when predicting self-reported diabetes status, but significant (p = .02) for the prediction of HbA1c. When people were split at median into those with lower and higher childhood cognitive ability (see Figure 1), the risk scores predicted HbA1c levels significantly more strongly in the lower cognitive ability group (β = .21, 95% CI [.11, .31], p < .001) than in the higher ability group (β = .10, 95% CI [.01, .19], p = .04; see also Supplemental Material for an alternative splitting). The nonsignificant interaction in the prediction of self-reported diabetes was in the same direction: the association between genetic risk and diagnosis was stronger in those below median cognitive ability (OR = 1.93, 95% CI [1.38, 2.74], p < .001) than among those with higher ability (OR = 1.64, 95% CI [1.10, 2.49], p < .05). These findings tended to replicate across the alternative risk scores based on fewer SNPs (see Supplemental Material for details). There was little evidence for the association being driven by participants with potential Type 1 diabetes or by the use of hypoglycemic drugs (see Supplementary Material for details). Finally, we found negligible evidence for the role of body mass index (BMI) in polygenic risk-diabetes association or in the polygenic risk-cognitive ability interaction (see Supplemental Material for details).

Bottom Line: The interaction term was not significant for self-reported diabetes (p = .34), although the genetic risk-diabetes association showed a tendency of being stronger among those with below-median cognitive ability.Higher premorbid cognitive ability may provide some environmental protection against the manifestation of Type 2 diabetes genetic risk.This information may improve early identification of diabetes risk and inform intervention development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus