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Using the Promise of Sonodynamic Therapy in the Clinical Setting against Disseminated Cancers.

Trendowski M - Chemother Res Pract (2015)

Bottom Line: Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that SDT has the ability to exhibit profound physical and chemical changes on cellular structure.Although SDT has shown efficacy against multiple adherent neoplastic cell lines, it has also shown particular promise with leukemia-derived cell lines.Each method offers a unique set of benefits and concerns that will need to be evaluated in preclinical mammalian models of malignancy before clinical examination can be considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Syracuse University, 107 College Place, Syracuse, NY 13244, USA.

ABSTRACT
Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a form of ultrasound therapy in which specialized chemotherapeutic agents known as sonosensitizers are administered to increase the efficacy of ultrasound-mediated preferential damage of neoplastic cells. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that SDT has the ability to exhibit profound physical and chemical changes on cellular structure. As supportive as the data have been, assessment of this method at the clinical level has been limited to only solid tumors. Although SDT has shown efficacy against multiple adherent neoplastic cell lines, it has also shown particular promise with leukemia-derived cell lines. Potential procedures to administer SDT to leukemia patients are heating the appendages as ultrasound is applied to these areas (Heat and Treat), using an ultrasound probe to scan the body for malignant growths (Target and Destroy), and extracorporeal blood sonication (EBS) through dialysis. Each method offers a unique set of benefits and concerns that will need to be evaluated in preclinical mammalian models of malignancy before clinical examination can be considered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Extracorporeal blood sonication. Hemodialysis requires the patient's blood to be pumped outside of the body into an extracorporeal setting. This provides an opportunity for leukemia cells to be sonicated without sound attenuation from anatomical structures, as ultrasound can be applied to the dialysis tubing. Sound intensities would likely be reduced as there is only a tube standing in the way between the ultrasonic waves and the patient's blood.
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fig2: Extracorporeal blood sonication. Hemodialysis requires the patient's blood to be pumped outside of the body into an extracorporeal setting. This provides an opportunity for leukemia cells to be sonicated without sound attenuation from anatomical structures, as ultrasound can be applied to the dialysis tubing. Sound intensities would likely be reduced as there is only a tube standing in the way between the ultrasonic waves and the patient's blood.

Mentions: Although such an approach is unfeasible for most malignancies, leukemia is unique in that it does not form a primary tumor site. However, its most beneficial asset can potentially be exploited as a profound fatal flaw. Since most leukemias are localized in the blood, it would be rather straightforward to draw the malignant cells out of the body through dialysis. While dialysis is typically used on patients to act as an artificial replacement for lost kidney function due to renal failure, it could also be employed to treat leukemia in an extracorporeal setting. Sonosensitizers can be injected i.v. as in the previous two procedures, with roughly the same amount of time passing before injection and sonication. The patient would then undergo a typical hemodialysis procedure in which blood is pumped outside of the body, thereby removing the natural sound barriers of human anatomy (Figure 2). There would be nothing standing in the way between the malignant cells and the ultrasonic waves that are able to elicit marked preferential damage. In effect, this SDT procedure allows an in vivo setting to become almost in vitro. Since the in vitro studies of SDT with leukemia have yielded notable results [85–90], this may be an effective method by which to administer ultrasound to patients.


Using the Promise of Sonodynamic Therapy in the Clinical Setting against Disseminated Cancers.

Trendowski M - Chemother Res Pract (2015)

Extracorporeal blood sonication. Hemodialysis requires the patient's blood to be pumped outside of the body into an extracorporeal setting. This provides an opportunity for leukemia cells to be sonicated without sound attenuation from anatomical structures, as ultrasound can be applied to the dialysis tubing. Sound intensities would likely be reduced as there is only a tube standing in the way between the ultrasonic waves and the patient's blood.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4562321&req=5

fig2: Extracorporeal blood sonication. Hemodialysis requires the patient's blood to be pumped outside of the body into an extracorporeal setting. This provides an opportunity for leukemia cells to be sonicated without sound attenuation from anatomical structures, as ultrasound can be applied to the dialysis tubing. Sound intensities would likely be reduced as there is only a tube standing in the way between the ultrasonic waves and the patient's blood.
Mentions: Although such an approach is unfeasible for most malignancies, leukemia is unique in that it does not form a primary tumor site. However, its most beneficial asset can potentially be exploited as a profound fatal flaw. Since most leukemias are localized in the blood, it would be rather straightforward to draw the malignant cells out of the body through dialysis. While dialysis is typically used on patients to act as an artificial replacement for lost kidney function due to renal failure, it could also be employed to treat leukemia in an extracorporeal setting. Sonosensitizers can be injected i.v. as in the previous two procedures, with roughly the same amount of time passing before injection and sonication. The patient would then undergo a typical hemodialysis procedure in which blood is pumped outside of the body, thereby removing the natural sound barriers of human anatomy (Figure 2). There would be nothing standing in the way between the malignant cells and the ultrasonic waves that are able to elicit marked preferential damage. In effect, this SDT procedure allows an in vivo setting to become almost in vitro. Since the in vitro studies of SDT with leukemia have yielded notable results [85–90], this may be an effective method by which to administer ultrasound to patients.

Bottom Line: Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that SDT has the ability to exhibit profound physical and chemical changes on cellular structure.Although SDT has shown efficacy against multiple adherent neoplastic cell lines, it has also shown particular promise with leukemia-derived cell lines.Each method offers a unique set of benefits and concerns that will need to be evaluated in preclinical mammalian models of malignancy before clinical examination can be considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Syracuse University, 107 College Place, Syracuse, NY 13244, USA.

ABSTRACT
Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a form of ultrasound therapy in which specialized chemotherapeutic agents known as sonosensitizers are administered to increase the efficacy of ultrasound-mediated preferential damage of neoplastic cells. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that SDT has the ability to exhibit profound physical and chemical changes on cellular structure. As supportive as the data have been, assessment of this method at the clinical level has been limited to only solid tumors. Although SDT has shown efficacy against multiple adherent neoplastic cell lines, it has also shown particular promise with leukemia-derived cell lines. Potential procedures to administer SDT to leukemia patients are heating the appendages as ultrasound is applied to these areas (Heat and Treat), using an ultrasound probe to scan the body for malignant growths (Target and Destroy), and extracorporeal blood sonication (EBS) through dialysis. Each method offers a unique set of benefits and concerns that will need to be evaluated in preclinical mammalian models of malignancy before clinical examination can be considered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus